Home
Search results “Uk hospital bladder cancer”
Bladder cancer and its signs and symptoms
 
02:35
Do you have blood in your urine or have an increased need to urinate? Hear Professor Nick James from Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Birmingham, UK explains the signs and symptoms of bladder cancer. Every year, almost half a million people worldwide are diagnosed with bladder cancer. Early diagnosis is key to preventing the cancer from spreading, so it is important to recognise the potential early symptoms. The most common symptom of bladder cancer is blood in the urine. Other symptoms include abdominal pain, lower back pain and bladder irritation. If you spot blood in your urine, which includes seeing a red or brown colour, it is recommended that you visit your doctor. To find out more about bladder cancer and the symptoms to take action early visit: www.wecarecampaign.org and sign-up to the We Care pledge. Mehr Videos auf http://www.youtube.com/roche
Views: 4743 Roche
Video 1 - Introduction to the Royal Berkshire Hospital Bladder Cancer Cystectomy team
 
07:39
This video is about the Royal Berkshire Hospital Bladder Cancer Cysectomy team. THIS IS ONE OF A SERIES OF SEVEN VIDEOS THAT ARE INTENDED TO PROVIDE INFORMATION AND REASSURANCE TO PATIENTS WHO HAVE BEEN DIAGNOSED WITH BLADDER CANCER AND REQUIRE A CYSTECTOMY
Views: 163 Alex Nairn
Having a cystoscopy | Cancer Research UK
 
01:42
A cystoscopy is a test to look inside your bladder. Find out what happens when you have the test and how you might feel. This is a Cancer Research UK video. Learn more about cancer tests at http://www.cancerresearchuk.org/about-cancer/cancers-in-general/tests/
Views: 10888 Cancer Research UK
CYSTOSCOPY
 
06:09
Cystoscopy (sis-TOS-kuh-pee) is a procedure that allows your doctor to examine the lining of your bladder and the tube that carries urine out of your body (urethra). A hollow tube (cystoscope) equipped with a lens is inserted into your urethra and slowly advanced into your bladder.
Views: 30860 TheDanAcademy
Bladder cancer my story so far
 
13:16
A little different topic please share and like Video https://youtu.be/c-nhiu1UcwE
Views: 4032 Manufanatic 99
Transurethral Resection (TUR) for Bladder Cancer
 
03:42
Transurethral Resection (TUR) for Bladder Cancer Transurethral resection (TUR) of the bladder is a surgical procedure that is used both to diagnose bladder cancer and to remove cancerous tissue from the bladder. This procedure is also called a TURBT (transurethral resection for bladder tumor). Essentially all patients are initially treated with a transurethral resection (TUR) of the bladder tumor followed by an immediate postoperative instillation of intravesical chemotherapy (mitomycin C is typically used in the UK), followed by periodic (6 weeks) intravesical instillations of bascillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG).* *Treatment of non-invasive urothelial bladder carcinoma: 1) curative treatment of carcinoma in situ; 2) prophylactic treatment of recurrence of : a) urothelial carcinoma limited to mucosa : Ta G1-G2 if multifocal and/or recurrent tumour, Ta G3, b) urothelial carcinoma in lamina propia but not the muscular of the bladder (T1), c) carcinoma in situ.
Robotic Prostatectomy | Prostate Cancer | Oncologist | Manipal Hospitals
 
05:54
This video is an informative animated presentation that explains in detail about robotic prostatectomy. If you have prostate cancer that has not spread beyond your prostate, your doctor may recommend robotic radical prostatectomy to remove your prostate gland. Prostate cancer is an abnormal growth of cells lining the tubular gland tissue inside your prostate. Your surgeon will make a small incision near your belly button and insert a plastic tube called a port. Carbon dioxide gas will be pumped into your abdomen through this port. The gas will inflate your abdomen giving your surgeon more room to see and move the surgical tools. After your abdomen is inflated a high-definition camera will be inserted into the port. Your surgeon will make additional port incisions for robotic instruments as well as for instruments used by patient side assistance. An assistant will insert all of the robotic tools through these ports. Unlike standard laparoscopic instruments, these tools can rotate 360 degrees and have more flexibility than a human wrist. Seated at a special console, your surgeon will operate the robotic arms and the camera with joystick like controls and foot pedals. Watch the video to know more in detail about robotic prostatectomy. Best Hospital in India: Manipal Hospitals is one of the top multi-specialty hospital in India located at all major cities like Bangalore, Vijayawada, Visakhapatnam, Goa, Salem, Jaipur, Mangalore. Provides world class 24/7 Emergency services. Our top surgeons are expertise in offering best treatment for Heart, Brain, Cancer, Eye, Kidney, Joint replacement surgery & all major surgeries at affordable cost. Health Check-up packages are also available. To know more visit our website : https://www.manipalhospitals.com/ Get Connected Here: ================== Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ManipalHospitalsIndia Google+: https://plus.google.com/111550660990613118698 Twitter: https://twitter.com/ManipalHealth Pinterest: https://in.pinterest.com/manipalhospital Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/company/manipal-hospital Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/manipalhospitals/ Foursquare: https://foursquare.com/manipalhealth Alexa: http://www.alexa.com/siteinfo/manipalhospitals.com Blog: https://www.manipalhospitals.com/blog/
Views: 302572 Manipal Hospitals
Cystoscopy Female Surgery
 
04:40
Patient Education & Engagement Company Your doctor has recommended that you undergo a Cystoscopy. But what exactly does that mean? The lower urinary tract allows your body to store and release urine. It's made up of two parts, the bladder and the urethra. Your bladder is a hollow organ that expands as it fills with urine. Because it is made of muscular tissue, it can also contract and force urine to pass out of the body, through the urethra. Your urethra carries urine from the bladder to the outside of your body. Your doctor feels that it is necessary to examine the interior of the urethra and bladder, to try to determine the cause of a problem that you may be having. Symptoms that may call for a routine Cystoscopy include: * Persistent infection of the urinary tract * Bladder stones * Bleeding while urinating * Irritation due to polyps, or * Changes to the bladder caused by cancer. Cystoscopy is a simple procedure during which your doctor will insert a well-lubricated, instrument called a cystoscope through your urethra and into your bladder. The cystoscope allows your doctor to visually inspect the interior of your bladder. It also allows your doctor to remove small pieces of tissue for later examination and even to crush small bladder stones, should any be present. Any tissue that your doctor removes from your bladder will be sent immediately to a laboratory for analysis. Your doctor will ask the laboratory to check for any sign of cancer or other abnormality. Your Procedure: On the day of your operation, you will be asked to put on a surgical gown. You may receive a sedative by mouth and an intravenous line may be put in. You will then be transferred to the operating table. Once on the table, your feet and legs will be placed in an elevated position with your knees apart. You'll be asked to urinate so the amount of urine remaining in the bladder can be measured. A nurse will then shave your pubic area and swab the opening of your urethra with an antiseptic solution. A well-lubricated cystoscope is gently inserted into the urethra and slowly guided inward. Once the cystoscope is inside the bladder, your doctor will inject a small amount of water through the cystoscope and into the bladder. The water serves to expand the bladder, helping your doctor to better examine the interior. It also helps by washing away any blood or remaining urine. You may feel a sense of fullness as though you need to urinate. You'll be encouraged to relax and not to try to retain the water in your bladder. As the team completes the inspection, they'll be looking for suspicious tissues. If they find bladder stones, your doctor may try to crush these so that they can pass out of the bladder during normal urination. If the team finds a suspicious growth they will use a special grasping tool to take a sample of tissue in order to send to a laboratory for analysis. When the inspection is complete, your doctor will remove the cystoscope and you'll be asked to empty your bladder. Your doctor will probably ask you to wear a temporary Foley catheter. A Foley catheter is a narrow tube inserted through your urethra and into your bladder. The catheter is connected to a bag that is attached to your leg by a strap. While the Foley catheter is in place, urine will pass from your bladder into the bag. You will not need to urinate into a toilet. The nurse will show you how to change the bag when it is full. An appointment will be made for you to return to the doctor's office in a couple of days to have the catheter removed. As soon as the anesthesia wears off and you feel comfortable, you'll be allowed to leave.
Views: 151447 CHI St. Luke’s Health
Spotting mouth cancer signs and symptoms early -- Mike's story -- Cancer Research UK
 
02:37
Mike tells us how he found his mouth cancer early. Learn about possible symptoms of mouth cancer and why it is important to see your doctor as soon as you have symptoms. This is a Cancer Research UK video. Learn more about mouth cancer at www.cancerresearchuk.org/cancer-help/type/mouth-cancer/ Video transcript: Mike: My name is Mike Donahue, I live in County Durham. I’m a professional magician and in 2007 I was diagnosed with mouth cancer. I was getting shaved for an event early evening to go out and perform at an event and I noticed a lump on my neck. At first I just thought it was muscle so for a couple of weeks I didn’t do anything and then I thought there’s maybe something not right here. So I went to the GP and as soon as he looked at it he faxed though to hospital just to get it checked in case it was cancer. And he actually mentioned the word cancer. I remember going to a Blackpool magic convention which I used to go to every year wondering whether I would have cancer or not when I came back. And they said yeah you’ve got cancer. So it was shock and devastation. But thanks the skill of the doctors and the brains of the medical world I’m still here. So very lucky but I put it down to going straight away really to get it seen to. The sooner you go to get it checked out the more chance you’ve got of recovering from whatever you have wrong with you so it makes sense to go early. For me, the fact that I went early, that’s why I’m still here and living a full life now. So I’m doing the best I can to be fit and I’m really happier than I’ve ever been in my life. Really happy.
Views: 50142 Cancer Research UK
THE CYSTOSCOPY BLUES - LIVE HARMONICA SOLO!!!
 
02:57
Watch ROCKY AMSTEL sing "THE CYSTOSCOPY BLUES" which features an "amazing" harmonica solo.....all recorded during my CYSTOSCOPY TREATMENT for my bladder cancer. The urologist and the nursing staff are amazingly professional.I felt very little pain and everything went quite smoothly. I'm not quite sure if they will ever forget the singing/blues harmonica player for quite awhile....TO BE CONTINUED!!!
Views: 19791 Rockyamstel001
Cystoscopy technique is to diagnose urinary system – Manipal Hospital
 
02:49
This animated video is an informative video that talks about the process of Cystoscopy in the excretory system including the urinary bladder. A Cystoscopy may reveal the following conditions; unusual growths such as a palate, urine tube cyst, bladder cyst or a tumour, a stone in or near the bladder, a chronic inflammation of the urinary tract, bladder inflammation, a stricture or narrowing of urethra, enlargement of the prostate gland, or ulcers in the bladder wall. The doctor will begin the process by applying a local anaesthetic to numb the area. Once the area is numb, the doctor will insert a tip of a cystoscope into the urethra and slowly advance it back into the bladder. The end of the cystoscope contains light source and lens, which projects images through an eye piece in onto a video screen. By introducing a clear sterile solution, your doctor will expand the bladder, and will carefully examine the lining of the bladder and urethra by looking through the eye piece on the cystoscope, as well as the image projected on the video screen. Watch this cytoscopy bladder video to understand more about the procedure. To know more visit our website : https://www.manipalhospitals.com/ Get Connected Here: ================== Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ManipalHospitalsIndia Google+: https://plus.google.com/111550660990613118698 Twitter: https://twitter.com/ManipalHealth Pinterest: https://in.pinterest.com/manipalhospital Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/company/manipal-hospital Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/manipalhospitals/ Foursquare: https://foursquare.com/manipalhealth Alexa: http://www.alexa.com/siteinfo/manipalhospitals.com Blog: https://www.manipalhospitals.com/blog/
Views: 117184 Manipal Hospitals
Endoscopic Bladder Resection for Bladder Cancer
 
04:16
Bladder cancer is any of several types of cancer arising from the epithelial lining (i.e., the urothelium) of the urinary bladder. Rarely the bladder is involved by non-epithelial cancers, such as lymphoma or sarcoma, but these are not ordinarily included in the colloquial term "bladder cancer." It is a disease in which abnormal cells multiply without control in the bladder. The most common type of bladder cancer recapitulates the normal histology of the urothelium and is known as transitional cell carcinoma or more properly urothelial cell carcinoma. Five-year survival rates in the United States are around 77%. Bladder cancer is the 9th leading cause of cancer with 430,000 new cases[3] and 165,000 deaths occurring in 2012. Signs and symptoms: Bladder cancer characteristically causes blood (redness) in the urine. This blood in the urine may be visible to the naked eye (gross/macroscopic hematuria) or detectable only by microscope (microscopic hematuria). Hematuria is the most common symptom in bladder cancer. It occurs in approximately 80-90% of the patients. Other possible symptoms include pain during urination, frequent urination, or feeling the need to urinate without being able to do so. These signs and symptoms are not specific to bladder cancer, and are also caused by non-cancerous conditions, including prostate infections, over-active bladder and cystitis. There are many other causes of hematuria, such as bladder or ureteric stones, infection, kidney disease, kidney cancers and vascular malformations. Patients with advanced disease refer pelvic or bony pain, lower-extremity edema, or flank pain. Rarely a palpable mass can be detected on physical examination. ***John Cudecki, M.D. provides expert commentary while surgical partner, Michael Gomez, M.D., performs a bladder tumor resection on a patient with bladder cancer from Mercy Hospital and Medical Center in Chicago, IL. The expert commentary features solutions for ergonomic positioning of the OR table and imaging monitors in a hybrid OR. Pls Subscriptions and Share : Follow us on: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCFFnAEmlw80lqFPtJ4-DRPg sbs15625@gmail.com https://twitter.com/BariSadik https://www.facebook.com/sadikatulbari.sadik https://www.facebook.com/mats.dmf?ref=hl tabersdictionary.blogspot.com
Views: 1851 Sadikatul Bari Sadik
New Bladder Cancer Test Could Greatly Improve Patient Care
 
01:27
UK researchers have developed a basic urine test that could greatly improve a patient's quality of life and has the potential to save the UK National Healthcare system over £100 annually. The study was published in the European Journal of Cancer. To read more... http://www.empowereddoctor.com/new-bladder-cancer-test-could-greatly-improve-patient-care For similar stories... http://www.empowereddoctor.com/bladder-cancer
Views: 231 EmpoweredDoctor
Life after Bladder Removal - Part I: Anatomy
 
17:16
In Part I of IV, Dr. Alexander Kutikov, Associate Professor of Surgical Oncology at the Fox Chase Cancer Center, breaks down anatomy basics.
Irrfan Khan BREAKS SILENCE on cancer treatment in London | वनइंडिया हिंदी
 
02:39
Irrfan Khan's emotional letter on his cancer is making rounds on social media. Actor poured his heart out in the letter and reveals how badly he is in pain. Everyone is praying for Irrfan Khan's recovery when he left everyone in complete shock that he has been diagnosed with a rare, high-grade neuroendocrine cancer. Soon the actor moved to UK for the treatment and since then has been giving occasional updates about his health. Watch video to know more! -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Subscribe to OneIndia Hindi Channel for latest updates on movies and related videos. You Tube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCOjgc1p2hJ4GZi6pQQoXWYQ Follow us on Twitter : https://twitter.com/oneindiaHindi Like us on Facebook : https://www.facebook.com/oneindiahindi Join our circle in Google Plus : https://plus.google.com/u/0/b/118156146313394866739/+oneindiahindi Download App: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=in.oneindia.android.tamilapp
Linda's Story - Two-Time Cancer Survivor | IU Health Saxony Hospital
 
02:14
Meet Linda Blair. After being in remission from bladder cancer, it came as a shock when she was diagnosed with breast cancer in August 2013. Linda received treatment from Dr. Patricia Rae Kennedy at IU Health Saxony Hospital. Hear her story and find out why she now won't go anywhere else.
Views: 7131 IUHealth
What it's Like to Have a CT Scan - Cancer Research UK
 
01:50
Find out what it's like to have a CT scan. Visit our website: http://www.cancerresearchuk.org/about-cancer/cancer-in-general/tests/ct-scan for more information on CT Scans, cancer staging and diagnosis.
Views: 64412 Cancer Research UK
What Is CIS Of The Bladder?
 
00:30
Dec 2015 consider patients with recurrent carcinoma in situ (cis) for an early cystectomy. Bladder cancer what clinical impact of the classification carcinoma in situ on tumor bladder stages and grades diagnosis, evaluation treatment survival patients with urinary all cis non invasive (of lining) messages pathology outlines. Unlike in situ carcinomas of other organs, transitional cell carcinoma (cis) the bladder is a highly aggressive, potentially high grade non invasive malignancy with tendency progression and outside all patients diagnosed to have cis histologically harrogate district hospital from august 94 99 were included study. Carcinoma in situ is a superficial bladder cancer that confined to the surface layer of. Carcinoma in situ bladder an early indication for cystectomy guidelines on non muscle invasive (ta, t1, cis) uroweb. Medscape article 1951847 overview "imx0m" url? Q webcache. All data the current recommendations for non muscle invasive bladder cancer are ultra short and based on literature (until end of 2012), with 12 jan 2015 transurethral resection tumor (turbt) is aimed at staging ta, t1 or cis removing all endoscopically visible lesions. Superficial bladder cancer an overview. Bladder cancer impact of carcinoma in situ the bladder uk national bcg immunotherapy for transitional cell 2003 state art european urology. However 17 dec 2010 at present, intravesical bcg instillation has been established as the first choice of treatment for bladder cis and contributed to their cancer, stage is determined based on examining sample removed during a tis this carcinoma in situ (cis) or 'flat tumor entity, frequently seen conjunction with other tumors represents significant cancers, but such an ominous significance 1 jun 1999 we studied 138 patients diagnosis urothelial mayo clinic between november 1972 august 1979 hello. The cellular growth pattern of cis differs from that papillary carcinoma. De novo cis constitutes less than 3. 13 sep 2016 bacillus calmette gurin (bcg) monotherapy is associated with better long term efficacy than alternating therapy with mitomycin c (mmc) and common symptoms of bladder cancer include blood visible in the urine of carcinoma in situ (cis), further treatment by flushing of drugs into the bladder is complete regression of existing superficial disease occurs in up to 70 Bladder cancer treatment of bladder carcinoma in situ treatment of cis versus stage 0 bladder cancer management of carcinoma in situ of the bladder best practice and early (non muscle invasive) bladder cancer staging. It is a high grade non invasive cancer of the flat transitional cells carcinoma in situ (cis) bladder flat, grade, urothelial. Bladder cancer treatment of bladder carcinoma in situ cis versus stage 0 management the best practice and early (non muscle invasive) staging. Recurrent cis, despite intravesical bacillus calmette gurin (bcg), is associated with a 63. Googleusercontent search. My husband is phil, age 67, very healthy,
Views: 14 E Answers
Frank Chinegwudoh speaks about bladder cancer on Sky News
 
03:09
Frank Chinegwudoh speaks about bladder cancer on Sky News, May 2013
Bladder cancer treatment in India at multispeciality hospitals
 
04:47
Bladder cancer treatment in India is provided at multispeciality hospitals in Mumbai, Delhi, Chennai by the team of expert medical professionals. Not only the Indian doctors are highly qualified but the support staff is also trained in providing high quality medical services. Bladder cancer refers to any of several types of malignant growths of the urinary bladder. It is a disease in which abnormal cells multiply without control in the bladder. Bladder cancer treatment remains a challenge despite significant improvements in preventing disease progression and improving survival. Bladder cancer treatment in India is available at low cost with all the modern facilities and techniques. Different types of treatment are available for patients with bladder cancer. Radiation therapy is a cancer treatment that uses high-energy x-rays or other types of radiation to kill cancer cells or keep them from growing. Chemotherapy is a treatment that uses drugs to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. Biologic therapy is another treatment for cancer that uses the patients immune system to fight cancer. Substances made by the body or made in a laboratory are used to boost, direct, or restore the bodys natural defenses against cancer. This type of cancer treatment is also called biotherapy or immunotherapy. Bladder cancer treatment in India is considered as best as it is performed using the finest and the modern facilities and latest technology. Medical tourism in India has goal to restore optimal health of patient within state-of-the-art facilities and comfortable and relaxing environment. To get more information on Bladder cancer treatment in India visit http://www.forerunnershealthcare.com or mail at enquiry@forerunnershealthcare.com or call us at +91-9371136499, +91-9860755000, + 1-415-599-2537 (USA) / +44-20-8133-2571 (UK).
Views: 1172 Saket Bezalwar
What Is A Bladder Cyst?
 
00:32
Uk 23 apr 2015 right panel sonograms in a 16 year old male adole adolescent with recurrent urinary tract infections. Cystitis symptoms, causes, and treatments medical news today. Learn about other bladder cancer signs and symptoms explore treatment options is where a growth of abnormal tissue, known as tumour, develops in the lining. Sagittal and axial scans show a thickened bladder wall tubular cystic structure right posterolateral to the urinary (arrowhead). These infections are more difficult to treat because many antibiotics cannot penetrate into the cyst fluid. Cyst treatment, removal, types & symptoms emedicinehealth. The patient underwent cystoscopy and contrast study of bladder lesion with urethral dilatation transurethral deroofing wall cyst under general anesthesia. Googleusercontent search. An intravenous ct urogram showed a 5. The following types of non cancerous tumours can the infection usually starts in bladder, but it spread to cysts kidneys. Anyone can develop everything you need to know about cystits. Cysts that form inside the lining of urinary bladder, hollow organ where urine collects before it's eliminated from body, are very rare in those with an otherwise normal tract bladder is a cystic formed consists stratum mucosum, lamina muscularis, and serous membrane. Bladder cysts symptoms, causes, treatment, outlook, and more healthline health bladder "imx0m" url? Q webcache. The staging of bladder cancer is determined by how far the has penetrated wall. Non cancerous tumours of the bladder canadian cancer society. A histologic diagnosis of cystitis 25 sep 2017 we report an extremely rare case a dermoid cyst the urinary bladder in 30 year old female who presented with pain left flank and dysuria since 9 months. Bacteria fasten to 23 oct 2017 webmd describes interstitial cystitis (ic), also known as painful bladder syndrome, including symptoms, causes, diagnosis, and treatments 6 sep 2011 cysts refer the fluid filled lesions found on lining of urinary. Learn more about the symptoms of bladder cancer and how it is prevented a cyst an abnormal, sac like structure that can be found anywhere in body. Certain types of cysts also have special designations and nomenclature 10 jun 2017. Signs and symptoms of a non cancerous tumour may include blood in the urine difficulty urinating. Cm filling defect cystic mass related to the base of bladder and prostate with mm thick wall. Cysts blocking the bladder netdoctor. What is a bladder cyst? Youtube. On imaging (ultrasound and computed tomography), a relatively well defined mass lesion with areas of fat calcification was seen. Bladder cysts symptoms, causes, treatment, outlook, and more. Bladder cancer symptoms & prognosis in men and women. But a doctor should investigate and rule out uti in 6 mar 2018 interstitial cystitis bladder pain urinary frequency flare with certain triggers if you have this condition. Learn about treatments and self care 6 mar 2018 blood in the urine (hematuria) someti
Views: 81 E Info
Southmead Hospital surgeons use robot to create a new bladder for cancer patients
 
02:59
Surgeons at Southmead Hospital are robotically constructing new bladders for cancer patients in a UK first. The procedure, known as a radical cystectomy and neo-bladder, used to be performed manually in open surgery by surgeons creating a new bladder for cancer patients who had to have the organ removed. Now Southmead Hospital, in Bristol, are making neo-bladders robotically from the patient's own bowel tissue inside their body for the first time. The keyhole surgery is less invasive, has a faster recovery time for patients.
Bladder-sparing treatments: an alternative to bladder removal for bladder cancer patients
 
01:35
Dr Anne Kiltie, from the University of Oxford, Oxford, UK, talks about an alternative type of therapy for bladder cancer patients who are not fit to have their bladder removed. This alternative, known as bladder spearing is when patients are given radiotherapy treatment over a period of 4 to 6 weeks. Generally, this treatment is well tolerated. Patients must be closely followed up with check cystoscopy, to ensure the tumour has not come back. Dr Kiltie explains that this treatment should ideally be given along with chemotherapy. However, not all patients especially older patients, do not deal with the chemotherapy very well. Therefore, new chemotherapy that are less toxic with fewer side effects are hoping to be developed. Recorded at the European Association of Urology (EAU) conference 2017 in London, UK.
Bladder Cancer's Missing Successful Treatment.
 
01:55
BCG the successful bladder cancer treatment is stopped. BCG Bacillus Calmette-Guerin the inventor, has been withdrawn from many hospitals in the United Kingdom due to an extraordinary shortage. With it's instillation, in many bladder cancer patients, a far better prognosis is promised. Many patients worried that their treatment will end, are put under unbearable anxiety and concern over their future. More unsettling is the fact it may be down to costs. More info... http://www.fightbladdercancer.co.uk .
Views: 1961 hillpost
Bladder preservation vs radical cystectomy
 
01:25
Anne Kiltie, MD, MRCP(UK), FRCR, from the University of Oxford, Oxford, UK, discusses the current NICE guidelines on cystectomy vs. bladder preservation for bladder cancer patients at the European Association of Urology (EAU) conference 2017 in London, UK. NICE guidelines encourage giving patients the option to choose whether or not to undergo a cystectomy, as long as counselling is provided by their treatment team. Prof. Kiltie, explains how the identification of biomarkers would help in this decision making, by identifying patients who would benefit from cystectomy or radiotherapy. No such biomarkers have been identified to date but this remains an area of interest.
Views: 59 VJOncology
Managing side effects in treatment of bladder cancer
 
00:52
Morgan Roupret, MD, PhD, from the Pitié-Salpétrière Hospital, Paris, France, discusses management of side effects in treatment of bladder cancer at the European Association of Urology (EAU) conference 2017 in London, UK. He states that in the near future, medication delivered directly to the bladder will be available to reduce the side effects of BCG and chemotherapy.
Views: 151 VJOncology
Male Cystoscopy Procedure | PreOp®  Patient Education
 
04:44
Male Cystoscopy Procedure | PreOp® Patient Education https://preop.com/preop/cystoscopy-male/ Patient Education Company Your doctor has recommended that you undergo a Cystoscopy. But what does that actually mean? The lower urinary tract allows your body to store and release urine. It's made up of two parts, the bladder and the urethra. Your bladder is a hollow organ that expands as it fills with urine. Because it is made of muscular tissue, it can also contract and force urine to pass out of the body, through the urethra. Your urethra carries urine from the bladder all the way through the opening in the penis. Your doctor feels that it is necessary to examine the interior of the urethra and bladder, to try to determine the cause of a problem that you may be having. Symptoms that may call for a routine Cystoscopy include: * Persistent infection of the urinary tract * Bladder stones * Bleeding while urinating * Irritation due to polyps, or * Changes to the bladder caused by cancer. Cystoscopy is a simple procedure during which your doctor will insert a well-lubricated, instrument called a cystoscope through your urethra and into your bladder. The cystoscope allows your doctor to visually inspect the interior of your bladder. It also allows your doctor to remove small pieces of tissue for later examination and even to crush small bladder stones, should any be present. Any tissue that your doctor removes from your bladder will be sent immediately to a laboratory for analysis. Your doctor will ask the laboratory to check for any sign of cancer or other abnormality. So make sure that you ask your doctor to carefully explain the reasons behind this recommendation. Your Procedure: On the day of your operation, you will be asked to put on a surgical gown. You may receive a sedative by mouth and an intravenous line may be put in. You will then be transferred to the operating table. Once on the table, your feet and legs will be placed in an elevated position with your knees apart. You'll be asked to urinate so the amount of urine remaining in the bladder can be measured. The nurse will swab the penis with an antiseptic solution. Your doctor will then lift your penis upward. A well-lubricated cystoscope is gently inserted into the urethra, the opening at the head of the penis, and slowly guided inward. When the cystoscope reaches the back of the penis, your doctor will pull the penis downward in order to create a straight path into the bladder.
Preventing cystectomy in patients with advanced or complicated bladder cancer
 
00:54
Morgan Roupret, MD, PhD, from the Pitié-Salpétrière Hospital, Paris, France, discusses preventing cystectomy in patients with advanced and complicated bladder cancer at the European Association of Urology (EAU) conference 2017 in London, UK. Currently, treatment for patients with advanced bladder cancer or urothelial inversion is a cystectomy. This has a significant impact on the patient’s quality of life. This can be avoided by removing the tumour, without performing a cystectomy, and treating circulating cells with systemic treatment, which will be available in the near future.
Views: 20 VJOncology
Discovery Days 2017 - Prof Ghulam Nabi - Bladder, Kidney and Prostrate Cancer
 
17:29
Urology is one of the most advanced branches of surgery and encompasses diseases of the kidneys, bladder and prostate. Research at the University aims to develop new techniques to allow us to detect and characterise cancers found in these areas of the body. Treating cancer is a complex issue that we are tackling by using research at the boundaries between medicines and physics, including keyhole surgery and advanced imaging. To find out more about Ghulam Nabi, please visit http://medicine.dundee.ac.uk/staff-member/professor-ghulam-nabi To find out more about studying Medicine at the University of Dundee, please visit http://medicine.dundee.ac.uk/undergraduate Discovery Days 2017 took place on 13th January 2017, to welcome in the University of Dundee's newest professors, award winning teachers and communicators. For more information, visit www.dundee.ac.uk/discoverydays
Sunrise Hospital bladder cancer detection and treatment FOX5 Vegas KVVU 2
 
03:32
FOX5 Las Vegas interview with Dr. Jay Krishna about Bladder Cancer and Blue Light Cystoscopy with Cysview at Sunrise Hospital and Medical Center (Las Vegas, NV)
Views: 662 BLC Cysview
How can we optimize contemporary bladder cancer care?
 
01:34
Morgan Roupret, MD, PhD, from the Pitié-Salpétrière Hospital, Paris, France, discusses optimization of contemporary bladder cancer care at the European Association of Urology (EAU) conference 2017 in London, UK. He highlights that bladder cancer has been treated with the same tools for over 30 years, and speaks about new therapies which are now available. Prof. Roupret also points out why a multidisciplinary team approach is needed for bladder cancer management.
Views: 82 VJOncology
Gall Bladder Removal Surgery..!! Cholecystectomy..!!
 
04:08
Cholecystectomy is the surgical removal of the gallbladder. It is a common treatment of symptomatic gallstones and other gallbladder conditions. Surgical options include the standard procedure, called laparoscopic cholecystectomy, and an older, more invasive procedure, called open cholecystectomy. The surgery can lead to postcholecystectomy syndrome, as well as more serious complications such as bile duct injury. Indications: Indications for cholecystectomy include inflammation of the gall bladder (cholecystitis), biliary colic, risk factors for gall bladder cancer, and pancreatitis caused by gall stones. Cholecystectomy is the recommended treatment the first time a person is admitted to hospital for cholecystitis. Cholecystitis may be acute or chronic, and may or may not involve the presence of gall stones. Risk factors for gall bladder cancer include a "porcelain gallbladder", or calcium deposits in the wall of the gall bladder, and an abnormal pancreatic duct. Cholecystectomy can prevent the relapse of pancreatitis that is caused by gall stones that block the common bile duct. Complications The most serious complication of cholecystectomy is damage to the bile ducts. This occurs in about 0.25% of cases. Damage to the duct that causes leakage typically manifests as fever, jaundice, and abdominal pain several days following cholecystectomy. The treatment of bile duct injuries depends on the severity of the injury, and ranges from biliary stenting via ERCP to the surgical construction of a Roux-en-Y hepaticojejunostomy. emphysematous cholecystitis bile leak ("biloma") bile duct injury (about 5–7 out of 1000 operations. Open and laparoscopic surgeries have essentially equal rate of injuries, but the recent trend is towards fewer injuries with laparoscopy. It may be that the open cases often result because the gallbladder is too difficult or risky to remove with laparoscopy) abscess wound infection bleeding (liver surface and cystic artery are most common sites) hernia organ injury (intestine and liver are at highest risk, especially if the gallbladder has become adherent/scarred to other organs due to inflammation (e.g. transverse colon) deep vein thrombosis/pulmonary embolism (unusual- risk can be decreased through use of sequential compression devices on legs during surgery) fatty acid and fat-soluble vitamin malabsorption
Views: 55387 SDM
Newcastle Urology: The Future of Patient Care and Surgical Innovation
 
06:47
With Robotic Surgery expanding beyond urology to become an essential life saving and health preserving intervention in all fields, medicine is becoming more and more open to the possible benefits of increased mechanization and digitization. Newcastle Urology is poised to take advantage of this paradigm shift. Part of the Newcastle Upon Tyne Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Newcastle Urology provides Urological services to the North East of England. The department offers robotic surgery in six different procedures, as well as having expertise in cutting edge laser treatment for prostate cancer, and leading care in bladder dysfunction. Newcastle Urology also works closely with Newcastle Surgical Training Centre, where surgeons from around the world are able to learn the latest robotic surgical techniques – ensuring urologists are equipped to provide the best possible treatment, and pave the way for a new generation of medicine that takes full advantage of the digital and mechanical technology available. http://newcastleurology.org.uk/
Views: 3470 WebsEdgeHealth
Shubham Gupta, MD - UK HealthCare
 
03:01
For more information or to schedule and appointment, visit http://ukhealthcare.uky.edu/physicians/shubham-gupta Transcription 00:00:05 I'm Shubham Gupta. I'm an assistant professor of Urology in the Department of Urology here at the University of Kentucky. My practice focuses on reconstructive urology and cancer survivorship, which is a mouthful, but the cancer survivorship part of it is patients who have had cancer and treatment for cancer, and they're doing fine from that. 00:00:26 So they've had the cancer removed or radiated, but now they have complications from that treatment itself. 00:00:31 Women with cervical cancer will have issues with their bladder after radiation for that, men with prostate cancer will have leakage of urine 00:00:39 after prostate removal. So we are able to perform the entire breadth and spectrum 00:00:44 of survivorship care to these patients who have had issues with genitourinary 00:00:48 malignancies in the past. So that is one aspect of it. The other aspect of my 00:00:53 practice is reconstructive urology, which is, to put it in very simplistic terms-- 00:01:01 it's like plumbing: if your plumbing is blocked you can remove the bad stuff and 00:01:05 put good things back together and that's really what I do, which is different from 00:01:08 oncology. If you have a diseased portion or diseased organ you remove it; our job 00:01:14 is more to reconstruct it. So within urology, it's a very small 00:01:19 niche, and we are the only center in the entire state that provides these 00:01:24 services. Some of the complicated operations and procedures we do are 00:01:29 things like urethraplasty. A urethraplastcy is an open reconstruction of 00:01:33 the urethra tube that men pee out of. I'm the only person in the entire state that 00:01:37 does it as well as I do with the volumes that we have. I have patients who come in 00:01:43 from Western Kentucky, Northern Tennessee, Southern Ohio, Indiana, West Virginia to 00:01:49 try and get that operation done here. The other thing is that a lot of other 00:01:53 centers, like Cleveland Clinic, that do this operation keep patients for two or 00:01:59 three days after surgery. Our outcomes, we think, are so great that we are able to send patients home the same day with excellent short-term as well as long-term results. 00:02:08 One of the other operations that I do very well, I think, is the treatment of Peyronie's disease, which is abnormal curvature of the penis. 00:02:18 It is something that affects one out of ten men. Men don't really want to talk about it because it can be a little embarrassing, but our center is the only center in the entire state that offers five different treatment options for Peyronie's disease, and we've had excellent outcomes with it, and I think over the last three years we've we've treated upwards of a hundred men, if not more, with Peyronie's disease.
Views: 862 UKHealthCare
‘It’s all about checkpoint inhibitors’ – Rob Jones on bladder cancer during ASCO 2017
 
02:40
Rob Jones, MD, University of Glasgow, UK gives us a neat round up of the important bladder cancer data being presented at ASCO 2017 as well as how physicians might use these data to inform their practice going forward. He discusses data from the pembrolizumab KEYNOTE-45 study and a study combining the PD1 checkpoint inhibitor with a novel IDO inhibitor.
Views: 203 VJOncology
St George’s University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust
 
06:39
St George’s University Hospitals offers unique and highly specialised services for bladder and renal cancer to a very wide base of patients across the South East of England and beyond. Key to these services is offering patients choice and options in treatment plans. There is a dedicated urologist for each case and dedicated service for bladder and renal cancer. Every bladder cancer patient is offered robotic surgery and 95% of surgery is minimally invasive. Because of this, the hospital can offer surgery to a wider population including older patients and 20% of patients are over 80 years of age. For kidney cancer the hospital can offer several treatment options including HiFu treatment. The department has strong links with radiologists and can offer embolization for both benign and malignant tumours. Patient can choose to have treatment close to where they live as St George’s University Hospitals provides services at 4 locations: Croydon University Hospital, Epsom Hospital, Queen Mary’s Hospital and St George’s. Patients have a full discussion with a multi-disciplinary team about their treatment. This ensures standardisation of care. Patients are supported by nurse specialists for help with disease management. There is a sense of shared ownership between the patient and surgeon about treatment plans. This a long term relationship and continuity of care is very important. http://www.stgeorges.nhs.uk
Views: 779 WebsEdgeHealth
Hospital Cancer Diagnostics Market 2014 for Spanish UK Italian German French
 
00:32
Hospital Cancer Diagnostics Market 2014 for Spanish, UK, Italian, German and French report cover mortality statistics and scientific views on the etiology of major types of cancer, e.g., lung, colorectal, breast, prostatic, pancreatic, leukemia, lymphoma, gastrointestinal, bladder, liver, ovarian, testicular, oral, skin and others.
Views: 10 Lisa Scott
Cancer Treatment and Radiotherapy Planning - Cancer Research UK
 
02:44
Radiotherapy is the use of high energy X-rays to treat cancer. It is a very common treatment for cancer. Learn what happens when you have radiotherapy for brain tumours and head and neck cancers. It is important when treating cancer to have the proper advice and to understand the treatments. This is a Cancer Research UK video. Learn more about radiotherapy at http://www.cancerresearchuk.org/cancer-help/about-cancer/treatment/radiotherapy/
Views: 28264 Cancer Research UK
Rehabilitation After a Stroke | HCA Healthcare UK
 
03:16
Rehabilitation after a stroke: Sophie tells her stroke story and we hear from the expert team at our world-class acute neurological rehabilitation unit at The Wellington Hospital. Find out more: https://www.hcahealthcare.co.uk/facilities/the-wellington-hospital/specialist-units/acute-neurological-rehabilitation-unit/ HCA Healthcare UK http://www.hcahealthcare.co.uk Call us on: 020 7608 6439
ANGEL OBINIM INSTANTLY HEALS WOMAN WITH BLADDER CANCER LIVE.
 
17:45
ANGEL OBINIM CHAUFFE INSTAMMENT LA FEMME AVEC LE CANCER BLADDER VIVANT.
Oncological Outcomes of Robotic Cystectomy: Mr. Nikhil Vasdev, FRCS (Urol)
 
28:03
U. K. Consultant Urological & Robotic Surgeon Mr. Nikhil Vasdev, Lister Hospital, Associate Lecturer in Urology at the University of Cambridge and Senior Clinical Lecturer in Urology at the University of Hertfordshire, was invited international faculty for the Robotic Surgeons Council of India, April 2016. Of treatment for radical cystectomy, he told the surgeons gathered: "I think it's a work in progress." He cites the higher rates of complications for Robotic radical cyctectomy when compared to robotic prostatectomy and robotic partial nephrectomy. His presentation covered the advancements and research taking place for bladder cancer in surgery and chemotherapy. Lymph node dissection, positive and negative margins, local recurrence and surgeons seeking good oncological outcomes are key points. Lecture, with PPT's, diagrams and robotic surgery video. 32:05
TURP Transurethral Resection Prostate, Penis and Bladder - PreOp® Surgery - Patient Education
 
04:31
http://PreOp.com - Patient Education Company Your doctor has recommended that you undergo a Trans Urethral Resection of the Prostate - or TURP. But what exactly does that mean? The prostate gland is a walnut-sized organ that is part of your reproductive system. It provides some of the fluid contained in semen. The prostate is located just under the bladder and behind the testicles. The urethra -- a hollow tube that carries both urine and semen to the penis -- passes through the prostate. In some men, the prostate gland becomes enlarged. Symptoms of an enlarged prostate include: Patient Education * a full bladder feeling even when the bladder is empty * pain when urinating * weak urinary stream * infertility * and sexual dysfunction. To relieve you of your symptoms, your doctor feels that you would benefit from a surgical procedure called TURP. TURP is designed to relieve symptoms by reducing the size of the prostate. It is also a diagnostic procedure. Tissue removed during a resection of the prostate or TURP is routinely screened for the presence of cancer. So make sure that you ask your doctor to carefully explain the reasons behind this recommendation. Your Procedure: On the day of your operation, you will be asked to put on a surgical gown. You may receive a sedative by mouth and an intravenous line may be put in. Once on the table, your feet and legs will be placed in an elevated position with your knees apart. The nurse will swab the penis with an antiseptic solution. Your doctor will then lift your penis upward. A well-lubricated instrument called a resectoscope is then gently inserted into the urethra. When the resectoscope reaches the back of the penis, your doctor will pull the penis downward in order to create a straight path into the prostate. Using this tool, your doctor will then scrape excess tissue from the prostate, restoring it to its normal size. Tissue removed from the prostate may be sent a laboratory for analysis. When the surgery is complete, your doctor will remove the resectoscope. Your doctor will probably ask you to wear a temporary Foley catheter. A Foley catheter is a narrow tube inserted through your urethra and into your bladder. The catheter is connected to a bag that is attached to your leg by a strap. While the Foley catheter is in place, urine will pass from your bladder into the bag. You will not need to urinate into a toilet. The nurse will show you how to change the bag when it is full. An appointment will be made for you to return to the doctor's office in a couple of days to have the catheter removed. As soon as the anesthesia wears off and you feel comfortable, you'll be allowed to leave. Patient Education Company
Prostate Cancer Care Appeal - giving men the best possible future.
 
03:51
Find out more about our Appeal to raise £2 million to buy two new surgical robots to treat men in Bristol and the South West with prostate cancer. Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in men. Every day more than 130 men are diagnosed with the disease in the UK. Unfortunately we will all know someone affected – a brother, son, father, grandfather, husband, partner or friend. Southmead Hospital is the one of the largest urological centres in the country. It is a designated as a European Centre of Excellence and also one of five centres recognised by The Urology Foundation (TUF) to train the next generation of robotic surgical consultants. Our team of leading surgeons have ensured that we are at forefront of prostate cancer care in the UK. But having helped save the lives of 1000s of men, our robot is now ageing. We need your support to help give more men in Bristol and the South West the very best prospect of recovery and survival through our Prostate Cancer Care Appeal. Why robotic surgery? Robotic prostate surgery is much better for men suffering with prostate cancer than traditional methods – it’s more accurate, less invasive, causes less blood loss, and reduces the length of stay in hospital. Men also have much better long term prospects for a full recovery. Your donations will: * Purchase two robots for the hospital to meet growing demand * Fund new diagnostic and treatment options * Support the training of the next generation of robotic surgeons It’s an ambitious appeal, but with your support we can protect and give men the best possible future. www.southmeadhospitalcharity.org.uk/prostate
Southmead Hospital Charity buys £750,000 surgical robot to fight prostate cancer
 
02:13
A pioneering £750,000 surgical robot has been purchased by Southmead Hospital Charity to treat men with prostate cancer at Southmead Hospital. And the charity is hoping to secure a further £750,000 in the coming year to purchase a second surgical robot to treat more men and expand robotic surgery into other cancers. The Charity launched the Prostate Cancer Care Appeal in 2016 to fund two urological surgical robots needed at Southmead Hospital. Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in men. Every day more than 130 men are diagnosed with the disease in the UK. Southmead Hospital is the one of the largest urological centres in the country, treating thousands of patients with prostate cancer a year, and was one of the first centres in the UK to specialise in robotic surgery to treat the disease. But having helped save the lives of thousands of men, Southmead Hospital’s first robot, bought in 2009, was aging and in need of replacement to enable the urology teams to be at the forefront of cancer care. Now a more advanced Intuitive Da Vinci robot will continue the pioneering work in treating men with prostate cancer from across Bristol and the South West thanks to Southmead Hospital Charity. Its not over yet - we need your support But the fundraising is not over yet and Southmead Hospital Charity is continuing the Prostate Cancer Care Appeal to buy a second robot which will enable the hospital to treat even more men in the region and to expand robot surgery to other types of cancers like kidney and bladder, as well as gynaecological cancers. Robotic surgery is more accurate, less invasive, causes less blood loss, and reduces the length of stay in hospital by one to three days compared to open surgical methods. Men also have much better long term prospects for a full recovery. Elizabeth Bond, head of fundraising at Southmead Hospital Charity, said: “We are thrilled to be able to fund the purchase of a new Da Vinci robot so that the urology team can continue the amazing work they do. “But there is still more work to do to reach our target and raise the money to buy a much needed second robot to keep up with demand for this type of surgery. “So we will be continuing to fundraise with the help of our brilliant community of fundraisers, donors and supporters and would love to hear from anyone who would like to donate or support the Prostate Cancer Care Appeal. “I’d also like to say a special thank you to everyone who has donated to or fundraised for the Prostate Cancer Care Appeal and made this possible – from abseils and marathons to bake sales and fancy dress up days – our fundraisers have been instrumental in reaching this goal. “We have also benefited from some very generous donations from private supporters, companies, community groups and grant giving bodies, particularly John Lewis Cribbs Causeway, Guildhall Chambers and the rotary clubs of Bristol, Bristol Breakfast and Chipping Sodbury and Yate.” Saving lives The Charity launched the Prostate Cancer Care Appeal in 2016 to fund two urological surgical robots needed at Southmead Hospital. Salah Albuheissi, lead urology consultant, said: “We’re very grateful to Southmead Hospital Charity and their fundraisers and donors, and I’d like to thank everyone who has supported the Prostate Cancer Care Appeal. “Our urology team have created a leading prostate cancer service and with the purchase of a new robot we can continue to be at the forefront of prostate cancer care and grow our expertise in treating other cancers robotically. “At the moment the demand for robotic procedures is greater than our capacity with one robot, a second surgical robot would enable us to treat even more men from across the region as well as provide robotic surgery for other types of cancer like kidney, bladder and gynaecological. “It means that more patients will benefit from a reduction in their length of stay in hospital and have quicker operations. “Our current robot will now be retired from surgery but used as a training model to train the next generation of robotic surgeons here in Bristol.” Andrea Young, North Bristol NHS Trust Chief Executive, said: “The new advanced Da Vinci robot ensures that our urology and surgical teams remain at the forefront of cancer care at Southmead Hospital and I am proud to see the great strides the department are making to ensure exceptional healthcare for our patients. “To reach this milestone is a fantastic achievement by Southmead Hospital Charity and their supporters, to whom we are very grateful for their continued support.” https://www.southmeadhospitalcharity.org.uk/latest-news/southmead-hospital-charity-buys-%C2%A3750000-surgical-robot-fight-prostate-cancer
Radiation Therapy for Cancer Treatment
 
02:37
When treating cancer, radiation x-rays are therapeutic and damage cancer cells within and around the tumor, as opposed to common diagnostic x-rays that you would receive with a chest x-ray for example. Radiation Therapy may be used to treat cancer, keep the cancer from spreading, slow the growth of cancer or relieve cancer symptoms.