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Adjuvant Therapy in Early-Stage ER-Positive, HER2-Negative Invasive Breast Cancer
 
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Dr. Hope Rugo shares her experience on the recommended treatment approach for ER-positive, HER2-negative breast cancer patients. She comments on what is the expected benefit of adjuvant chemotherapy and endocrine therapy in luminal breast cancers and mentions that one of the greatest challenges is to understand the heterogeneity of the tumor. She also provides interesting comments on the use of criteria like tumor grade and size to select the patients for adjuvant chemotherapy as well as the usage of IHC markers such hormone receptors ER-positive, PR and Growth Factor Receptor HER2 to identify patients for chemotherapy. Finally, she speaks about tools such Adjuvant! Online and Predict and debates if these tools could be used to select luminal breast cancer patients confidently for adjuvant chemotherapy. _______________________________________________________ Hope Rugo, MD, is the Clinical Professor, Department of Medicine (Hematology/Oncology); and Director, Breast Oncology and Clinical Trials Education at the University of California San Francisco Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center.
Просмотров: 9378 Genomic Health, Inc.
Triple Negative Breast Cancer: What you need to know
 
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We teach you why Triple Negative Breast Cancer is threatening. Learn how it is treated, and it's link to the BRCA genetic mutation. VISIT THE BREAST CANCER SCHOOL FOR PATIENTS: http://www.breastcancercourse.org LIST OF QUESTIONS FOR YOUR DOCTORS: http://www.breastcancercourse.org/breast-health-updates-latest-videos/ FOLLOW US: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Breast-Cancer-School-for-Patients-958519147618444/ _________________________ Questions for your Breast Surgeon and Medical Oncologist: 1. What exactly is triple negative breast cancer? 2. Will I need Chemotherapy? 3. What are the benefits of Neoadjuvant Chemo? 4. Isn’t Neoadjuvant Chemo recommended more now? 5. Do I qualify for BRCA genetic testing? 6. Should I consider a Clinical Trial? 7. What is “Triple Negative” breast cancer? “Triple Negative” breast cancers are fast growing tumors that more frequently spread beyond the breast to other parts of the body. Because of this, they are a bigger threat to your life than most other types of cancers of similar size with a different receptor pattern. These cancers are called “triple negative” because the three most important breast cancer “receptors” on the surface of the cells are not present (negative). When present, these receptors are used as targets to attack the cancer with medications. When absent, the main medical therapy is chemotherapy. Your Breast Surgeon will know your “receptor pattern” within days after your initial breast biopsy. These results are often not communicated to you early on in your decision process. Although only 15% of breast cancers are “triple negative,” it is imperative that you specifically ask your surgeon immediately, and well before surgery, “What are my receptor results?” “Triple Negative” is treated with Chemotherapy These cancers are often sensitive to chemotherapy and it is offered to almost everyone healthy enough to tolerate it. Chemotherapy is obviously a more intense cancer treatment than hormonal therapy (pills). But unfortunately, since triple negative cancers do not have “Estrogen receptors” (ER negative), hormonal therapy is not helpful at all. The time to cure triple negative cancer is now, not when it recurs later. Chemotherapy and surgery is the standard for treating triple negative breast cancer. Ask about the benefits of “Neoadjuvant Chemo” What is often overlooked are the benefits of offering neoadjuvant chemotherapy for patients with triple negative, “Early-Stage” (I & II) breast cancer. There may be distinct advantages (listed below) to having chemotherapy before surgery, not after surgery if you have a triple negative tumor. The decision to consider neoadjuvant chemotherapy always begins with your breast surgeon. You must address this “cutting edge” treatment option well before surgery to benefit from neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Do not be afraid to ask. This is a very important question. The Potential Benefits of Neoadjuvant Chemo: *Begin life-saving chemotherapy earlier *Reduce the need for a mastectomy *Improve cosmetic outcomes with a lumpectomy *Reduce the need for an “Axillary Dissection” *Allows more time for BRCA genetic testing *More time to think about “lumpectomy vs. mastectomy” *Shows your cancer team if the chemo is working *Can sometimes eliminate all cancer cells before surgery *May reduce the need for radiation after a mastectomy Ask for BRCA Genetic Testing Triple negative breast cancers can be associated with inherited genetic mutations. Any woman who has ever been diagnosed with a triple negative breast cancer at age 60 or younger is at a high risk for carrying the BRCA mutation. If you also have a strong family history of breast or ovarian cancer you are at an even higher risk. Unfortunately, genetic testing is often not offered for triple negative breast cancer patients. It is important to ask for BRCA Genetic Testing in this situation. The BRCA (Breast Cancer) gene is commonly referred to as “The Breast Cancer Gene.” If someone inherits a broken version (mutation) of this gene at conception, they carry a very high lifetime risk of breast cancer and ovarian cancer. African Americans are a higher risk for Triple Negative African American and women of West African descent are at a higher risk of developing triple negative breast cancers than most other ethnic groups. Thirty percent (30%) of all breast cancers in this group are triple negative. Younger women are at a higher risk for Triple Negative Women diagnosed with invasive breast cancer before 40 are at a higher risk for having triple negative disease when compared to older women. Any women diagnosed before the age of 50 qualifies for genetic testing and should consider genetic counseling. Ask if you would benefit from a Clinical Trial New therapies must be studied in clinical trials to make sure they are safe and effective at treating breast cancer. Ask your medical oncologist if they offer or recommend you participate in a clinical trial.
Просмотров: 5751 Breast Cancer School for Patients
Breast Cancer Receptors: Learn What You Need to Know
 
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We teach you to about breast cancer tumor receptors and why they are important in your breast cancer treatment. Chemotherapy and hormonal therapy are based on your receptor pattern. VISIT THE BREAST CANCER SCHOOL FOR PATIENTS: http://www.breastcancercourse.org LIST OF QUESTIONS FOR YOUR DOCTORS: http://www.breastcancercourse.org/breast-health-updates-latest-videos/ FOLLOW US: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Breast-Cancer-School-for-Patients-958519147618444/ _________________________________ Questions for your Breast Surgeon and Medical Oncologist: 1. What receptors do my tumor have? 2. What type of treatment do they suggest I will need? 3. May I have a copy of all my pathology reports? 4. Do my receptors already suggest I need chemotherapy? 5. Do my receptors show I will need hormonal therapy? 6. Would I benefit from neoadjuvant chemotherapy? What are Breast Cancer Receptors? Once a breast biopsy is determined to be an invasive by a pathologist under the microscope, they will automatically run at least three more tests on the same tissue to determine what “receptors” are present. Receptors are tiny proteins on the surface of the cells that act like “light switches” that can turn cancer cell growth “on” or “off.” The Estrogen receptor (ER), Progesterone receptor (PR), and HER2 receptor results are incredibly important for you to know and understand. Receptors are different than “grade” and “stage” as outlined in the diagram below. All are different pieces of the breast cancer puzzle that your physicians will assemble to determine the best therapy for you. In the case of receptors, these are key determinants as to whether you will or will not benefit from hormonal therapy (pills) or chemotherapy. The receptors involving a precancerous lesion such as DCIS have different implications and are addressed in our DCIS course. Receptors that suggest Hormonal Therapy Estrogen Receptor Positive (ER+) tumors are always treated with hormonal therapy. Usually these types of medications (pills) are taken for a total of 5 to 10 years. It is still possible that one may need chemotherapy in addition to hormonal therapy. If you are Progesterone Receptor Positive (PR+) then you will likely need hormonal therapy, even if you are ER-. The Estrogen Receptor plays a much more important role in cancer care than the Progesterone Receptor. Receptors that suggest Chemotherapy Determining if you need chemotherapy is a very complex decision process and is primarily driven by your medical oncologist. Your “receptor pattern” is a key piece of information that is known early in your breast cancer journey. In about 30% of patients with an invasive breast cancer, the receptor pattern alone can strongly suggest that chemotherapy will be needed, regardless of what is found at surgery. We list a few of the more common “chemotherapy receptor patterns” below. Many factors, including a large cancer and cancer that is present in the lymph nodes, also point someone towards chemotherapy. Take our video lesson on “Will I Need Chemotherapy“ (here). Often if someone needs chemotherapy, they will likely benefit also from hormonal therapy after chemotherapy if their estrogen receptor is positive. Estrogen Receptor Negative (ER-) tumors do not respond to anti-estrogen oral medications that are essential for treating estrogen receptor positive (ER+) tumors. Quite simply, patients with ER negative tumors will benefit from chemotherapy if they are healthy enough to tolerate it. ER negative tumors are more aggressive cancers, but respond very well to chemotherapy. This includes “triple negative” breast cancers. Progesterone Receptors (PR) play a much smaller role than estrogen or HER2 receptors and are not addressed here. HER2 Receptor Positive (HER2+) tumors are very responsive to chemotherapy when paired with new breakthrough drugs that target these tumors, such as Herceptin and Perjeta. The same holds true if a HER2-positive tumor is also ER positive. Take our “HER2-Positive“ video lesson to learn more (here). HER2-positive tumors are more aggressive cancers, but we now can treat them more effectively with chemotherapy and “targeted immunotherapy” drugs that are designed to destroy HER2-positive cancers. “Triple Negative” (ER-)(PR-)(HER2-) tumors are also fast growing tumors that are usually treated with a specific chemotherapy regimen. These tumors are not responsive to hormonal therapy at all, but are sensitive to chemotherapy. If you have “Triple Negative Breast Cancer“ review our video lesson (here). Take home message: Make sure to ask for a copy of the pathology report from your biopsy. Ask your breast surgeon and medical oncologist to explain to you what your receptors mean regarding your treatment. Sometimes the HER2 receptor results can take up to two weeks to become finalized. Inquire early on with your physicians about your benefit from hormonal therapy and/or chemotherapy.
Просмотров: 1793 Breast Cancer School for Patients
Adjuvant therapy for early stage ER-positive, HER2-negative invasive breast cancer
 
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Hope S. Rugo, MD, of UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, San Francisco, CA, shares her experience on the recommended treatment approach for oestrogen receptor (ER)-positive, HER2-negative breast cancer patients. Prof Rugo comments on the expected benefit of adjuvant chemotherapy and endocrine therapy in luminal breast cancers and mentions that one of the greatest challenges is to understand the heterogeneity of the tumour. She also comments on the use of criteria, such as tumour grade and size, to select patients for adjuvant chemotherapy as well as the usage of immunohistochemistry (IHC) markers, such as hormone receptor markers, to identify patients for chemotherapy. Finally, she speaks about tools, such as Adjuvant! Online and Predict, and debates if these tools could be used to select luminal breast cancer patients confidently for adjuvant chemotherapy. This content is supported by Genomic Health, Inc.
Просмотров: 457 European Medical Group
Genomic Testing in Breast Cancer: What You Must Know
 
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We teach you about genomic testing and how these sophisticated tests can guide you to personalized therapies for your breast cancer. THE BREAST CANCER SCHOOL FOR PATIENTS: http://www.breastcancercourse.org LIST OF QUESTIONS FOR YOUR DOCTORS: http://www.breastcancercourse.org/breast-health-updates-latest-videos/ FOLLOW US: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BreastCancerSchoolForPatients/ ________________________________ Questions for your Breast Surgeon and Medical Oncologist: *Do I qualify for an Oncotype DX genomic test? *If so, will you order genomic testing for me? *Would you order a genomic test before I see a medical oncologist? *Are there any other genomic tests that apply to me? *What is a genomic assay? These sophisticated tests are performed on a small sample of cancer tissue in appropriate patients with early stage breast cancer. Genomic tests are usually ordered after surgery when the pathology report is finalized. It measures unique aspects of the tumor to determine if a patient will benefit from chemotherapy in addition to hormonal therapy. Such “genomic assays” developed over the last decade are a dramatic advance in breast cancer care. The Oncotype DX assay by Genomic Health Inc. is the most utilized genomic assay of those available in the United States. Who should consider a genomic test? Patients who have small “Estrogen receptor positive” (ER+) and “HER2 receptor negative” (HER2-) tumors and no evidence of cancer in their lymph nodes may benefit from an Oncotype DX assay. The purpose of this test is to better identify people who do and do not benefit from chemotherapy. The decision to undergo chemotherapy is a complicated one. Your medical oncologist will examine multiple factors to help determine if you will benefit from chemotherapy. The NCCN Guidelines, listed in the website links below, outline in much greater detail recommendations for the use of genomic tests. An Oncotype DX test can be instrumental in this decision for many patients. You may qualify for a Genomic Assay if… You have early stage cancer (Stage I or II) Your tumor is Estrogen receptor positive (ER+) Your tumor is Her2 receptor negative (HER2-) No cancer was found in your lymph nodes You are willing to consider having chemotherapy You are healthy enough to undergo chemotherapy How is chemotherapy tailored to patients? Genomic breast cancer tests are a leap forward in our ability to “look inside” breast cancer cells. Sophisticated breast cancer care is based upon the principle of providing maximal benefit from the least toxic therapy. Newly diagnosed breast cancer patients deserve the best information available to decide whether they need chemotherapy. Take our video lesson on “Will I Need Chemotherapy?“ (here) to understand the general concepts. Genomics is a promising and rapidly developing field. OTHER GENOMIC TESTS: Oncotype DX Breast DCIS Test This assay of DCIS or “precancerous” breast cells may help identify some women who may not benefit from radiation therapy after a lumpectomy. Genomic Health Inc. is a leading personalized medicine company. More information is about this test is located (here). MammaPrint This genomic test is used for Stage I and II breast cancers to determine prognosis and survival. This test is now included in national guidelines for some with hormone sensitive breast cancers that are found to have a small amount of cancer in a few lymph nodes. It is also a genomic test for some without “node positive” breast cancer. Agendia is a leader in personalized and molecular cancer diagnostics. More information about MammaPrint is located (here). Endopredict EndoPredict is a 2nd generation genomic breast cancer recurrence test to assess for 10-year risk of cancer recurrence. This test also accounts for tumor size in helping determine if chemotherapy may be needed in early stage, favorable breast cancers. Myriad Genetics is global leader in genetic testing and personalized medicine. More information about Endopredict is located (here). Breast Cancer Index (BCI) This test is designed for women with favorable, early stage breast cancer who have been on hormonal therapy for 4 to 5 years. It can help determine if someone will benefit (or can avoid) five additional years of hormonal therapy, such as tamoxifen or an aromatase inhibitor. This test is not yet approved by the FDA. Medicare and some insurance companies may cover the cost. Biotheranostics is a molecular diagnostics company. More information about BCI is located (here). Take Home Message: Make sure to ask both your breast surgeon and medical oncologist if a genomic assay might play a role in your treatment decisions. For appropriate patients, these tests should be considered only one piece of the many “pieces of the puzzle” in deciding treatment decisions about chemotherapy and hormonal therapy.
Просмотров: 1277 Breast Cancer School for Patients
Triple-negative breast cancer
 
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Triple-negative breast cancer (sometimes abbreviated TNBC) refers to any breast cancer that does not express the genes for estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR) and Her2/neu. This makes it more difficult to treat since most chemotherapies target one of the three receptors, so triple-negative cancers often require combinatorial therapies (see below). Triple negative is sometimes used as a surrogate term for basal-like; however, more detailed classification may provide better guidance for treatment and better estimates for prognosis. Triple-negative breast cancers comprise a very heterogeneous group of cancers. There is conflicting information over prognosis for the various subtypes but it appears that the Nottingham prognostic index is valid and hence general prognosis is rather similar with other breast cancer of same stage, except that more aggressive treatment is required. Some types of triple-negative breast cancer are known to be more aggressive with poor prognosis, while other types have prognosis very similar or better than hormone receptor positive breast cancers. Pooled data of all triple-negative subtypes suggest that with optimal treatment 20-year survival rates are very close to those of hormone positive cancer. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Просмотров: 1644 Audiopedia
TRIPLE NEGATIVE - BREAST CANCER
 
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For patients with triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) Triple negative breast cancer represents 15-20% of all breast cancers. A triple negative breast cancer diagnosis means that the cancer cells have tested negative for three different receptors that are commonly found on breast cancer cells: the estrogen receptor (ER), the progesterone receptor (PR) and the human epidermal growth factor (HER-2). When these receptors are not present on the cell, non-chemotherapy treatments that block these receptors, such as hormone therapy or targeted therapy, do not work and the only treatment available is chemotherapy.
Просмотров: 1230 Ruby Collins
How to Pronounce ER Negative PR Negative HER2 Neu Negative Breast Cancer
 
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http://www.youtube.com/user/EnglishQ3
Просмотров: 408 English
Treatments for HR+, HER2-Negative Metastatic Breast Cancer
 
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Debu Tripathy, MD, discusses the updated NCCN guidelines for the treatment of hormone receptor–positive, HER2-negative metastatic breast cancer. For more resources and information regarding anticancer targeted therapies: http://targetedonc.com/
Просмотров: 239 Targeted Oncology
Will I need Chemotherapy for My Breast Cancer?
 
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We teach you how your tumor receptors, lymph nodes, genomic assays, and breast cancer stage indicates if you would benefit from chemotherapy. VISIT THE BREAST CANCER SCHOOL FOR PATIENTS: http://www.breastcancercourse.org LIST OF QUESTIONS FOR YOUR DOCTORS: http://www.breastcancercourse.org/breast-health-updates-latest-videos/ FOLLOW US: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Breast-Cancer-School-for-Patients-958519147618444/ ____________________________________ Questions for your Medical Oncologist and Breast Surgeon: 1. Would I benefit from chemotherapy? 2. What factors suggest I will benefit from chemotherapy? 3. What is the risk to my life if I do not undergo chemotherapy? 4. What are the advantages of “Neoadjuvant Chemo” before surgery? 5. Would a “Genomic Assay” help determine if I need chemotherapy? 6. What is chemotherapy? Chemotherapy is the use of certain medications to treat cancer systemically, meaning throughout the whole body. If needed, chemotherapy is usually given after surgery for invasive breast cancer. It is a more intense cancer treatment than hormonal therapy (usually pills). Only a minority of breast cancer patients will ever need it. These complex decisions are ones you will make with your medical oncologist. You will make better treatment choices when you are informed about chemotherapy and hormonal therapy before meeting with your medical oncologist. General indications for chemotherapy We outline below some of the more common indications for needing chemotherapy. The decision to undergo chemotherapy also involves being healthy enough to tolerate the treatment. Deciding who needs chemotherapy and what type of chemotherapy to administer is one of the most difficult decisions made in medicine. Your medical oncologist will guide you. Do my “receptors” suggest I need chemotherapy? Once a breast biopsy is found to be cancerous, the pathologists will automatically run more tests on the same tissue to determine what “receptors” are expressed. Your receptor pattern is a key piece of information that comes early in your breast cancer journey. In about 30% of patients with an invasive breast cancer, the receptor pattern alone can strongly suggest that chemotherapy will be needed regardless of what is found at surgery. The key points regarding receptors are outlined below. Estrogen Receptor Negative (ER -) tumors (20%) do not respond to anti-estrogen oral medications that are essential in treating estrogen receptor positive (ER +) tumors. Quite simply, patients with ER negative tumors will benefit from chemotherapy if they are healthy enough to tolerate it. ER negative tumors are more aggressive cancers, but respond more favorably to chemotherapy than ER positive breast cancers. HER2 Receptor Positive (HER2+) tumors (20%) are very responsive to chemotherapy when paired with new breakthrough drugs that target these tumors, such as Herceptin and Perjeta. The same holds true even if a HER2-positive tumor is also Estrogen Receptor positive (ER+). HER2+ tumors are more aggressive cancers, but we now can treat them more effectively with chemotherapy and new drugs that are “targeted” to destroy HER2-positive cancers. “Triple Negative” (ER-)(PR-)(HER2-) tumors are fast growing tumors that are usually treated with a specific chemotherapy regimen. These tumors are not responsive to hormonal therapy at all, but may be sensitive to chemotherapy. What if cancer is detected in the lymph nodes? If you have “lymph node positive” breast cancer, it is likely you will be offered chemotherapy. Premenopausal women and those with multiple “positive” lymph nodes generally benefit from chemotherapy. If your breast surgeon detects cancer in your lymph nodes before surgery, there may be specific advantages to undergoing “neoadjuvant chemotherapy.” “Inflammatory Breast Cancer” requires chemotherapy If you have been diagnosed with inflammatory breast cancer, the first step is neoadjuvant chemotherapy before surgery. This type of cancer has a high likelihood of spreading to the lymph nodes and other parts of the body. Starting chemotherapy as soon as possible is essential to treating this aggressive breast cancer. A mastectomy is performed after chemotherapy, followed by radiation to the area of the mastectomy to lessen the chance of cancer growing back in that area. What are the advantages of “neoadjuvant chemotherapy”? Neoadjuvant chemotherapy is when chemotherapy is given before surgery, not afterwards. There are specific advantages to neoadjuvant chemotherapy in appropriately selected patients. How can a genomic “Oncotype DX” test be helpful? Patients who have a small, estrogen receptor positive, HER2 receptor negative tumor and no evidence of cancer in their lymph nodes may benefit from an Oncotype DX genomic assay. This cutting-edge test looks deeper into breast cancer cells to better identify people who may benefit from chemotherapy with ER+, HER2 – breast cancers.
Просмотров: 3934 Breast Cancer School for Patients
Chemotherapy for Node Negative Breast Cancer
 
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Click Here & Get The 15 Breast Cancer Questions To Ask Your Doctor http://www.breastcanceranswers.com/what-breast-cancer-questions-to-ask/# Breast Cancer Answers is a social media show where viewers submit a question and get the answer from an expert. Submit your question now at, http://www.breastcanceranswers.com/ask. This information should not be relied upon as a substitute for personal medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Use the information provided on this site solely at your own risk.  If you have any concerns about your health, please consult with a physician.
Просмотров: 16366 Breast Cancer Answers®
Is triple negative breast cancer aggressive ? |Health Issues & Answers
 
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10, in addition, triple negative breast cancer tends to be more aggressive than other types of breast cancer. Breast cancer survival by stage at diagnosis moose and docpeer support. 88 triple negative breast cancer (sometimes abbreviated tnbc) refers to any breast cancer that some types of triple negative breast cancer are known to be more aggressive with poor prognosis, while other types have very similar or better different kinds of breast cancers are treated differently and tend to have different outcomes. Learn about risk factors, how it is diagnosed, and 27, breast cancer survival rates by stage of the disease. Metaplastic breast cancer frequently asked questions. It's more likely to spread beyond your breast, and 9, indeed, tnbc is one of the most aggressive types cancer. Objectives to 3 triple negative breast cancer is an aggressive type of that difficult treat. From the moment you hear a metaplastic breast cancer is rare and aggressive form of. Women diagnosed with tnbc are four times more likely to have that cancer triple negative breast is a type of does not receptors for the hormones oestrogen and progesterone or protein her2. Looked at 269 triple negative breast cancer patients all treated the same institution between 15 and 20 percent of cancers are found to be. 1, women with tnbc experience the peak risk of recurrence within 3 years aetiology and treatment of the aggressive molecular sub types that 30, that's important because triple negative breast cancer is more aggressive than other forms. Triple negative breast cancer new treatment combos show triple understanding foundation combats aggressive the fate of chemoresistance in (tnbc prognosis compared to other why i say no chemo for and. Will i survive this aggressive stage 3 breast cancer? It has spread talking with patients about a diagnosis of triple negative cancer epidemiological considerations and causes, symptoms treatment. You hear people call tnbc aggressive and hard to treat, but chemotherapy 1, 2011 you also be interested in triple negative breast cancer types of disease some are very aggressive, what is the treatment for cancer? Her 2 negative, er pr can more difficult treat 24, (tnbc) a heterogeneous small (ct1a b) node potentially as well. Survival of triple negative versus positive breast cancers cancer what you need to know. There are a number of sub types including spindle cell. The stage of breast cancer and the triple negative tumors are often aggressive have a poorer prognosis (at least within first 5 years after diagnosis) compared to er positive cancers 30, tnbc tends be aggressive, so find out what you're at. Triple negative breast cancer national foundation. That can make treatment more difficult triple negative breast cancer be aggressive and to treat. Often it is triple negative. Understanding a breast cancer diagnosis american society. Living beyond breast triple negative cancer living diagnosis & treatment johns update on prognosis and ncbi nih. Triple negative breast cancer national foundationsusan gtriple 5 things you should know. Md it's time to be positive about triple negative breast cancer survivorship foundation. Triple negative breast cancer is one of the areas md anderson focusing on 30, results showed i had in fact got a rarer type aggressive triple. Triple negative breast cancer national foundation how triple behaves and looks breastcancer symptoms diagnosis trip_neg behavior url? Q webcache. These cells move through the blood stream and pathways that 4, i found lump myself in march 2008 when my right breast began hurting. The stage (extent) of the cancer can also affect treatment and i believe you can! just like will beat my own 3 with lymph node involvement triple negative bc as well!! try not to focus on so at time her diagnosis, she felt that it [triple breast cancer] was a is going respond aggressive chemotherapy associated 15, (tnbc) accounts for 15. Tnbc is often more aggressive than other types of cancers. Studies have shown that triple negative breast cancer is more likely to spread beyond the and recur (come back) after treatment 6, about 15 20 percent of people with (tnbc). You will 31, the triple negative breast cancer foundation works with conquer of asco to provide provides funds and services for approximately 15. We are not going to attempt summarize these statistics here, but rather give a broader picture of triple negative prognosis compared less aggressive breast doctors found two tumors in my right breast, both cancer, which means it's more and faster growing. Also, the cancer is more likely to spread and recur. Googleusercontent search. Spotlight stories karena triple negative breast cancer foundation. Triple negative breast cancer wikipedia. There is no 'good' type of breast cancer, but to 4, aggressive cancer cells travel from the other parts body. Young african american women and it is an aggressive cancer background triple negative (tn) positive (tp) breast cancers both are ty
Просмотров: 1711 BEST HEALTH Answers
Metastatic breast cancer: Estrogen receptor mutations detected are associated with worse survival
 
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Dr Chandarlapaty talks to ecancertv at SABCS 2015 about the results of a study looking at two genetic mutations in the estrogen receptor 1 gene (ESR1) and how this affected the outcomes of women with estrogen receptor-positive metastatic breast cancer. The Y537S and D538G mutations in ESR1 are common alterations seen in metastatic breast cancer and result in making the receptor estrogen independent and can results in resistance to estrogen deprivation therapy such as an aromatase inhibitor. Using blood samples from the BOLERO-2 study, Dr Chandarlapaty and colleagues hypothesized that cell free DNA (cfDNA) analysis of a patient’s plasma could be used to detect the presence of the mutations. The mutations were found in about 30% of women and women with these mutations had a shorter OS than women who did not have these mutations. Dr Chandarlapaty says that one major implication of these data is that it shows a blood sample could be taken to test for these mutations and provide important prognostic information.
Просмотров: 664 ecancer
Breast Cancer Sub-types - Triple Negative Breast Cancer
 
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“Triple negative” is the term used to describe tumors that are ER-negative, PR-negative, and HER2-negative. It’s estimated that about 20% of breast tumors are triple negative.
Просмотров: 3593 Dr. Susan Love Research Foundation
Breast Cancer Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy: For Patients
 
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We teach you about the benefits of neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Chemotherapy before surgery, rather than afterwards, may offer distinct advantages in your unique breast cancer situation. VISIT THE BREAST CANCER SCHOOL FOR PATIENTS: http://www.breastcancercourse.org LIST OF QUESTIONS FOR YOUR DOCTORS: http://www.breastcancercourse.org/breast-health-updates-latest-videos/ FOLLOW US: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Breast-Cancer-School-for-Patients-958519147618444/ ___________________________________ Questions for your Breast Surgeon and Medical Oncologist: 1. Do you know now, before surgery, if I will need chemotherapy? 2. If “yes,” should we consider “Neoadjuvant Chemo” before surgery? 3. What are the benefits of Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy? 4. Isn’t Neoadjuvant Chemo recommended more now? 5. Do my receptors suggest I will need chemotherapy? 6. Do I have cancer in my axillary nodes? 7. Will you ultrasound my axillary lymph nodes today? 8. What is Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy? Neoadjuvant chemotherapy is when chemotherapy is given before surgery, not afterwards. Most never require chemotherapy. But if chemotherapy is needed, there can be specific advantages to neoadjuvant chemotherapy. This approach is a “cutting edge” trend in sophisticated breast cancer care. If your breast biopsy “receptor pattern” suggests you need chemotherapy, it is important for you to inquire about the possible benefits of neoadjuvant chemotherapy with your breast surgeon. If cancer is detected in your lymph nodes before surgery, you may also benefit from neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Learn more about receptors and chemotherapy with our video lesson “My Tumor Receptors” (here). When is chemotherapy generally needed? If needed, chemotherapy is most commonly given after surgery (“adjuvant” chemo) for invasive breast cancer. It is a more intense cancer treatment than hormonal therapy. Only a minority of breast cancer patients will ever need chemotherapy. These complex decisions are ones you will make with your medical oncologist and breast surgeon. You will make better treatment choices when you are well informed about chemotherapy before you meet your breast surgeon and medical oncologist. Would I benefit from “Neoadjuvant Chemo?” What is often overlooked are the benefits of offering neoadjuvant chemotherapy for appropriate “Early-Stage” breast cancer. The decision to consider neoadjuvant chemotherapy always begins with your breast surgeon. You and your breast surgeon will choose the initial direction of your entire breast cancer treatment plan. You must address this treatment option before surgery to benefit from neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Some breast surgeons do not yet embrace neoadjuvant chemotherapy for early stage cancers. Do not be afraid to ask. This is a very important question. The Potential Benefits of Neoadjuvant Chemo: *Begin life-saving chemotherapy earlier *Reduce the need for a mastectomy *Improve cosmetic outcomes with a lumpectomy *Reduce the need for an “Axillary Dissection” *Allow more time for BRCA genetic testing *More time to think about “lumpectomy vs. mastectomy” *Shows your cancer team if the chemo is working *Can eliminate all cancer cells before surgery in some *Reduce the need for radiation after a mastectomy Who may benefit from Neoadjuvant Chemo: We list below a few of the criteria important in deciding if neoadjuvant chemotherapy is an option for someone who has yet to undergo breast cancer surgery. Your Breast biopsy “Tumor receptors” reveal *“HER2-positive” receptors *“Triple Negative” receptors *Estrogen receptor negative OR: *Cancer is found in the Axillary Nodes before surgery *A tumor larger than 5 centimeters *Diagnosis is inflammatory breast cancer What “Receptor Patterns” suggest Neoadjuvant Chemo? HER2-Positive Receptor (HER2+) tumors are incredibly responsive to chemotherapy when paired with new breakthrough drugs that target these cancers, such as Herceptin and Perjeta. The same holds true if a HER2-positive tumor is also ER positive. “Triple Negative” (ER-)(PR-)(HER2-) tumors are also fast growing tumors that are usually treated with a specific chemotherapy regimen. These tumors are not responsive to hormonal therapy, but can be very sensitive to chemotherapy. Visit our “Triple Negative Breast Cancer“ video lesson (here). Estrogen Receptor Negative (ER-) tumors do not respond to anti-estrogen oral medications that are essential for treating estrogen receptor positive (ER+) tumors. Quite simply, patients with ER negative tumors will benefit from chemotherapy. Why does “Inflammatory Breast Cancer” mean Neoadjuvant Chemo? If you have been diagnosed with inflammatory breast cancer, the first step is always neoadjuvant chemotherapy before surgery. This type of cancer has a high likelihood of spreading to the lymph nodes and other parts of the body. Starting chemotherapy as soon as possible is essential to curing this aggressive breast cancer.
Просмотров: 959 Breast Cancer School for Patients
What is Metastatic Breast Cancer? | Dana-Farber Cancer Institute
 
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Metastatic breast cancer is a stage of breast cancer that has moved to other parts of the body. Eric P. Winer, MD, director of Breast Oncology at the Susan F. Smith Center for Women's Cancers describes metastatic breast cancer symptoms and treatment options. To learn more about how Dana-Farber treats metastatic breast cancer, visit http://www.dana-farber.org/Adult-Care/Treatment-and-Support/Treatment-Centers-and-Clinical-Services/Breast-Cancer-Treatment-Center/Metastatic-Breast-Cancer-Expertise.aspx Transcription: Text: What is metastatic breast cancer? What is the prognosis? How is it treated? Dr. Winer: When we talk about metastatic breast cancer, we’re talking about a stage of breast cancer. Whether a woman has triple negative breast cancer or estrogen receptor positive breast cancer or HER2-positive breast cancer, there is the possibility that that cancer can spread or metastasize, and that means that the cancer moves to other parts of the body, such as the bones, the lungs, the liver, the brain, or a whole variety of other sites. Text: What is the prognosis? Dr. Winer: Women who have metastatic breast cancer can live with it for many years—in some cases many, many, many years—but ultimately it is something that can threaten a woman’s life, and at this point in time, we do not have therapy for women with metastatic breast cancer that can reliably eliminate the cancer and allow a woman to live without treatment and to live a normal lifespan. Text: How is it treated? Dr. Winer: The way we treat metastatic breast cancer very much depends on the subtype of cancer. We treat estrogen receptor positive metastatic breast cancer differently from estrogen receptor negative metastatic breast cancer, and we have an entirely different set of treatment approaches for HER2-positive breast cancer. Many of our clinical trials focus on women who have metastatic breast cancer, and we are actively looking at new treatments for women with metastatic breast cancer with the idea that treatments that work in this setting may then ultimately be used in women with earlier-stage breast cancer as well with the goal of preventing them from ever developing metastatic breast cancer.
Просмотров: 7218 Dana-Farber Cancer Institute
Triple-Negative Breast Cancer From Every Angle
 
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Hear the latest about triple-negative breast cancer from our guest panelists, including some of the myths surrounding it and the research being done to find new treatments. The panel will also discuss side effects, the unique emotional concerns for people with TNBC and how to find a support system. About Our Panelists Helen L. Coons, PhD, ABPP is a board certified clinical health psychologist with over 25 years of professional experience with women and men with cancer, oncology health care providers and the cancer advocacy community. She routinely provides care to women across the life span with early and advanced breast, gynecologic and other cancer diagnoses before, during and after treatment, as well as women at “high risk” for cancer, and caregivers. Dr. Coons is a member of LBBC’s Medical Advisory Board and the advisory committee for an advanced breast cancer survey for Novartis' oncology division. Linda Cooper, LCSW, OSW-C is a licensed clinical social worker and a certified oncology social worker. She joined Rocky Mountain Cancer Centers in the spring of 2008. Linda has worked as a social worker in oncology and psychiatry services, hospitals and clinics, hospice programs, hospital emergency rooms, and geriatric settings. She is especially committed to working with older adults on their cancer journey and advocating for all cancer patients as they cope with quality of life issues. Moderator Janine E. Guglielmino, MA Senior Director, Programs and Partnerships Living Beyond Breast Cancer
Просмотров: 4576 Living Beyond Breast Cancer
Treatment Strategies in ER-Positive Breast Cancer
 
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Adam Brufsky, MD, discusses tamoxifen therapy and the use of genomic assays in estrogen-receptor positive metastatic breast cancer. For more expert insight, visit http://www.onclive.com/insights/evolution-metastatic-breast-cancer
Просмотров: 380 OncLiveTV
Treatment of ER+ Breast Cancer
 
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SERM = SELECTIVE estrogen receptor modulator, not "SPECIFIC" estrogen receptor modulator, which is what i said in this video. Sorry for the confusion!
Просмотров: 935 YT Productions
Strategies for Selecting Therapy in HER2-Negative Breast Cancer - Gnant - Harbeck
 
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View an educational symposium webcast from the 2012 ESMO Congress in Vienna featuring Drs PierFranco Conte, Nadia Harbeck, Robert Coleman, and Michael Gnant discussing the implications of heterogeneity within HER2-negative breast cancers on clinical behavior and treatment selection and examining recent clinical trial data on the efficacy and safety of therapy for HER2-negative breast cancer, including endocrine therapy, chemotherapy, and targeted agents. View the full video and download slides at http://www.primeoncology.org/online_education/solid_tumor/2012/breastwebcast_2012_vienna.aspx
Просмотров: 333 prIME Oncology
When to Use the Oncotype DX® Breast Cancer Assay in Treatment Decisions
 
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Dr. Hope Rugo explains what is the Oncotype DX Breast Cancer Assay and how is it performed, detailing the specificities of the test, especially how the Recurrence Score® result of the Oncotype DX Breast Cancer Assay is reported. She highlights the way, she and her multidisciplinary team, choose to use a genomic test such as the Oncotype DX Breast Cancer Assay to make adjuvant chemotherapy decisions in luminal breast cancers. She comments on the way to use the Oncotype DX Breast Cancer Assay: does it complement or compete with traditional markers or other markers such ER, PR or HER2? She mentions that the Recurrence Score result is very complementary and clarifies for which patients (ER+, HER2-, node positive or node negative) the Oncotype DX Breast Cancer Assay is indicated. _______________________________________________________ Hope Rugo, MD, is the Clinical Professor, Department of Medicine (Hematology/Oncology); and Director, Breast Oncology and Clinical Trials Education at the University of California San Francisco Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center.
Просмотров: 3429 Genomic Health, Inc.
Adjuvant Hormonal Therapy for Estrogen Receptor Positive Early Stage Breast Cancer
 
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This video clip will review hormonal therapy options for both pre- and post-menopausal women with estrogen receptor positive, early stage breast cancer. The risks and benefits of Tamoxifen and the Aromatase Inhibitors (anastrozole, letrozole, exemestane) are discussed.
Просмотров: 3995 Mayo Clinic
Hormonal therapy in breast cancer
 
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This video describes therapy with anti-estrogens medications in breast cancer.
Просмотров: 25097 charlottecancer
Breast Cancer Treatment Update | Cindy Matsen, MD
 
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A new study shows many women with the most common kind of early-stage breast cancer (hormone-receptor–positive, HER2–negative breast cancer) can skip chemotherapy. Dr. Cindy Matsen explains the study's findings and how it will impact patients.
Просмотров: 338 Huntsman Cancer Institute
BREAST CANCER ,Plant Based Diet May Convert Aggressive Type To Treatable One
 
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BREAST CANCER ,Plant Based Diet May Convert Aggressive Type To Treatable One. Researchers at the University of Alabama at Birmingham have found a dietary combination that transforms the most lethal of all breast cancers into a highly treatable breast cancer. Specifically, scientists involved in the Scientific Reports study say a particular plant-based diet may be the key. Trygve Tollefsbol, Ph.D., D.O., professor of biology in the College of Arts and Sciences and senior scientist with the Comprehensive Cancer Center as well as Yuanyuan Li, M.D., Ph.D., a research assistant professor of biology, use epigenetics — the study of biological mechanisms that will switch genes on and off — as a mechanism to identify ways we can change human gene expressions in fatal diseases, including breast cancer. All breast cancers are either estrogen receptor-positive or estrogen receptor-negative. The tumors in estrogen receptor, or ER, negative breast cancer are much less likely to respond to hormone therapy than are tumors that are ER-positive, which means that ER-negative breast cancers are typically very aggressive. “Unfortunately, there are few options for women who develop ER-negative breast cancer,” Tollefsbol said. “Because of the poor prognosis this type of cancer carries, new advances in prevention and treatment for ER-negative breast cancer have particular significance.” With that in mind, Tollefsbol and fellow researchers set out to further research how scientists can efficiently neutralize mechanisms that lead to, and worsen, ER-negative cancers. Up until this time, conventional cancer prevention has focused primarily on single chemopreventive compounds. “One reason many in the field shy away from combining two or more compounds at a time for treatment research is the fear of adverse effects and potential interactions that are unknown,” Tollefsbol said. “To overcome that concern, we chose compounds that we felt confident would interact well together, because they have similar favorable biological effects but still have different mechanisms for carrying out these effects that would not interfere with one another.” Tollefsbol and his team identified two compounds in common foods that are known to have success in cancer prevention and that could potentially be combined to successfully “turn on” the ER gene in ER-negative breast cancer so that the cancer could be treated with estrogen receptor inhibitors such as tamoxifen. “One way we can use epigenetics as a powerful tool to fight cancer is through compounds found in our everyday diet,” Tollefsbol said. “Vegetables, for example, are filled with these types of compounds. Your mother always told you to eat your vegetables, and science now tells us she was right.” Another compound found in green tea has been shown to stimulate epigenetic changes in cancerous genes, according to prior studies from Tollefsbol’s lab. These compounds, used in the right way, can help modulate gene expression aberrations that are contributing to the disease. The researchers found that a combination of dietary plant-derived compounds consisting of sulforaphane from cruciferous vegetables such as broccoli sprouts, along with polyphenols from green tea, is successful in preventing and treating ER-negative breast cancer in mice that are genetically programed to develop ER-negative breast cancer at high rates. Further investigation revealed that the mechanism for the efficacy of these two dietary compounds involved epigenetic changes induced in the ER gene regulatory region. With the combined dietary treatment the researchers administered, the tumors in the mice were converted from ER-negative to ER-positive cancers. This rendered the breast cancer easily treatable with tamoxifen, an estrogen receptor inhibitor. “The results of this research provide a novel approach to preventing and treating ER-negative breast cancer, which currently takes hundreds of thousands of lives worldwide,” said Li. “The next step would be to move this to clinical trial, and to eventually be able to provide more effective treatment options for women either predisposed to or afflicted with this deadly disease.”
Просмотров: 5640 Be Healthy
Health Alert: Triple Negative Breast Cancer
 
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ASHEVILLE, N.C.-- At least one in 10 cases of breast cancer turns out to be "triple negative," and those numbers are on the rise. Treatment options are limited, but are not without Hope. "I was soaping up, and getting clean then I felt a lump" says cancer survivor Trina Jackson. Images and biopsies determined 49-year-old Trina Jackson not only had breast cancer, but the kind labeled triple negative. It's a term showing up more and more on websites and even in television commercials. Dr. David J. Hetzel of Hope Women's Cancer Center says triple negative is a sub-type of breast cancer. "Often we are looking at the estrogen receptor, the her-2 receptor, the progesterone receptors. There are certain cancers that will have receptors being positive. Triple negatives mean they don't have any of the receptors" he adds. Trina learned during doctor visits at Hope Women's Cancer Center that triple negative is more difficult to treat, failing to respond to medication or hormone therapy. Surgery and radiation are options, but chemotherapy is more commonly used with triple negative. Some studies show only 25 to 50 percent of women diagnosed with advanced stages are alive in 10 years. That is why researchers are trying to better understand the cause and, more importantly, develop more effective treatments. Pink in the Park celebrates breast cancer survivor-ship each year. Trina used that day to educate other women about the importance of early detection, and the seriousness of triple negative. "The only thing I can do at this point is live for today, take care of today. Whatever happens tomorrow, I'll deal with that at that time" she says.
Просмотров: 691 WLOS News 13
Treating Triple Negative Breast Cancer
 
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Erica Mayer, MD, MPH, and Nancy Lin, MD, detail their approach to treating triple negative breast cancer. Learn more www.dana-farber.org/Health-Library/Triple-Negative-Breast-Cancer
Просмотров: 414 Dana-Farber Cancer Institute
Breast Cancer | Dr. Tony Talebi discusses the Treatment of Stages 1 to 3 "triple negative" Breast Ca
 
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Dr Tony Talebi interviews Dr Stefan gluck regarding the management of locally advanced triple negative breast cancer. Watch further discussions at http://www.HemOnc101.com Treatment of locally advanced stage 1 to 3 triple negative breast cancer Breast cancer is the most common female cancer in the US, the second most common cause of cancer death in women, and the main cause of death in women ages 40 to 59. Important risk factors for breast cancer are age (older), gender (female), reproductive history (less children), hormonal factors (early menses and late menopause), and family history. Triple-negative breast cancer refers to any breast cancer that does not express the genes for estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR) or Her2/neu. Triple negative is sometimes used as a surrogate term for basal-like, however more detailed classification is possible providing better guidance for treatment and better estimates for prognosis. Treatment of Triple Negative Breast Cancer: Standard treatment is surgery with adjuvant (after surgery) chemotherapy and radiotherapy. As a variation neoadjuvant (before surgery) chemotherapy is very frequently used for triple negative breast cancers. This allows for a higher rate of breast conserving surgeries and by evaluating the response to the chemotherapy gives important clues about the individual responsiveness of the particular cancer to chemotherapy. Here, Dr. Tony Talebi discusses the treatment of locally advanced stage 1 to 3 triple negative breast cancer with Dr. Stefan Gluck including diagnosis, staging, genetic implications, surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy for triple negative breast cancer. Dr. Stephan Gluck is currently a professor of medicine at the University of Miami Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center. Dr. Gluck Credentials: -Associate Division Chief for Clinical Affairs, Division of Hematology/Oncology -Clinical Director, Braman Family Breast Cancer Institute Education: University of Toronto Toronto, Canada Fellowship Bone Marrow Transplant and Medical Oncology 1991 Heinrich Heine University Dusseldorf, Germany Chief Resident Internal Medicine 1987 Heinrich Heine University Dusseldorf, Germany Residency Internal Medicine 1986 RWTH Aachen Aachen, Germany Ph.D. Experimental Pharmacology 1980 Free University of West Berlin Berlin, Germany M.D. Internal Medicine 1978 Free University of West Berlin Berlin, Germany Rotating Internship Internal Medicine 1978 Ruhr Universitaet Bochum, Germany Undergraduate Pre-Clinical Sciences Breast cancer is the most common female cancer in the US, the second most common cause of cancer death in women, and the main cause of death in women ages 40 to 59. Important risk factors for breast cancer are age (older), gender (female), reproductive history (less children), hormonal factors (early menses and late menopause), and family history. Triple-negative breast cancer refers to any breast cancer that does not express the genes for estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR) or Her2/neu. Triple negative is sometimes used as a surrogate term for basal-like, however more detailed classification is possible providing better guidance for treatment and better estimates for prognosis. Standard treatment is surgery with adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy. As a variation neoadjuvant (before surgery) chemotherapy is very frequently used for triple negative breast cancers. This allows for a higher rate of breast conserving surgeries and by evaluating the response to the chemotherapy gives important clues about the individual responsiveness of the particular cancer to chemotherapy. Here, Dr Stephan Gluck discuses general the treatment of locally advanced stage 1 to 3 triple negative breast cancer. Dr. Stephan Gluck is currently a professor of medicine at the University of Miami Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center. Dr. Gluck Credentials: -Associate Division Chief for Clinical Affairs, Division of Hematology/Oncology -Clinical Director, Braman Family Breast Cancer Institute Education: University of Toronto Toronto, Canada Fellowship Bone Marrow Transplant and Medical Oncology 1991 Heinrich Heine University Dusseldorf, Germany Chief Resident Internal Medicine 1987 Heinrich Heine University Dusseldorf, Germany Residency Internal Medicine 1986 RWTH Aachen Aachen, Germany Ph.D. Experimental Pharmacology 1980 Free University of West Berlin Berlin, Germany M.D. Internal Medicine 1978 Free University of West Berlin Berlin, Germany Rotating Internship Internal Medicine
Просмотров: 2025 Tony Talebi, MD
Hormone Receptor-Positive Breast Cancer
 
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Breastlink founder Dr. Link, author of “The Breast Cancer Survival Manual,” explains why drugs like Tamoxifen and aromatase inhibitors reduce a woman’s risk of developing breast cancer. When researches began sequencing cancer genes in 2003 and 2004, they discovered that cancer wasn’t a homogenous disease. There were variations and they eventually divided cancer into subtypes: triple negative (15% of breast cancer), HER2 amplified type (12-15% of breast cancer), and hormone receptor positive, also known as the luminal cancer (over 70% of breast cancer). Luminal cancer cells have estrogen and progesterone receptors on their surface and have to receive these hormones in order to survive. To prevent these tumors from getting estrogen, doctors prescribe Tamoxifen, which blocks the estrogen receptors and kills the cell. After a woman goes into menopause and her ovaries stop producing estrogen, the tumor can still receive estrogen from the adrenal gland. Aromatase inhibitors are used to block adrenal estrogen. For more information about Breastlink and breast cancer, visit our website: www.breastlink.com
Просмотров: 4592 Breastlink Orange
Hormonal Therapy for Breast Cancer: We Teach You
 
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We teach you about hormonal therapy for breast cancer. Drugs such as tamoxifen and aromatase inhibitors are key treatment options for most breast cancers. VISIT THE BREAST CANCER SCHOOL FOR PATIENTS: http://www.breastcancercourse.org LIST OF QUESTIONS FOR YOUR DOCTORS: http://www.breastcancercourse.org/breast-health-updates-latest-videos/ FOLLOW US: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Breast-Cancer-School-for-Patients-958519147618444/ ________________________________ Questions for your Medical Oncologist: 1. What type of hormonal therapy do you recommend? 2. Will I also benefit from chemotherapy? 3. What are the side effects of hormonal therapy? 4. Will I need 5 or 10 years of these medications? 5. Would the genomic assay Oncotype DX be helpful? 6. What is Hormonal Therapy? Anti-estrogen (estrogen-blocking) medications, prescribed as pills, are incredibly effective at treating certain types of breast cancer. Hormonal therapy is given to about 70 to 80% of women with breast cancer. Chemotherapy, on the other hand, is a more intense cancer treatment that is generally administered intravenously. Most patients will not need chemotherapy. Many women that do need chemotherapy will also benefit from hormonal therapy. These treatment decisions are complex ones with your medical oncologist. You will make better choices when you are well informed before meeting with your medical oncologist. Do my “Receptors” suggest Hormonal Therapy? When the estrogen circulating in your blood stream interacts with a breast cancer that has “Estrogen Receptors” (ER) present on its surface, it tends to flip the ER switch to the “on” or “grow” position for ER Positive tumors. The same can be said to a lesser extent for the “Progesterone Receptor,” if your cancer is found to also be PR positive. Patients with ER+ breast cancers almost always benefit from the anti-estrogen effects of hormonal therapy. These medications can make cancer cells die, or slow down their growth. If a few cancer cells have already spread to other parts of the body, these medications are incredibly effective at preventing these cells from growing and threatening your life in the future. In other words, those who take hormonal therapy for ER+ tumors have a more successful chance at long-term survival when compared to those who do not. About 80% of all breast cancers are ER+. Even if your medical oncologist recommends chemotherapy for you, if your tumor is ER+ you will also benefit from up to 10 years of hormonal therapy after chemotherapy. Hormonal therapy is never given during chemotherapy nor during radiation therapy. What is “Tamoxifen?” Tamoxifen is an anti-estrogen medication (pills) that has been used with great success with ER+ cancers for three decades. It is now the primary hormonal therapy for younger, pre-menopausal women. It is also the primary drug for men with breast cancer. It is used for some post-menopausal women. What are “Aromatase Inhibitors?” Aromatase inhibitors (AIs) are a class of anti-estrogen medications (pills) that have proven to be slightly more effective than Tamoxifen for post-menopausal women. It is not recommended for younger, pre-menopausal women, except in certain circumstances. The three most common versions are Anastrozole (Arimidex), Letrozole (Femara), and Exemestane (Aromasin). What are the side effects of Hormonal Therapy? Side effects vary greatly from one person to the next for both types of hormonal medications. Some have no symptoms at all. Most have very tolerable side effects. Some patients will need to change hormonal therapy medications to find the best balance of cancer benefit versus side effects. Several side effects that are rather common for both tamoxifen and aromatase inhibitors are hot flashes, night sweats, joint pain, and vaginal dryness. Below, we list some of the other specific side effects for both drugs. Tamoxifen Side Effects: Increased risk of uterine (endometrial) cancer Increased risk of developing blood clots Slows normal bone loss in most women (a “good” side effect) Cannot be taken during pregnancy because of risk of birth defects or fetal death Can temporarily induce menopause in pre-menopausal women. Aromatase Inhibitor Side Effects: Can worsen bone loss (osteoporosis) in women Muscle and joint aches and pains Would an “Oncotype DX” assay help me? Patients who have a small, estrogen receptor positive, HER2 receptor negative tumor, and no evidence of cancer in their lymph nodes may benefit from an Oncotype DX genomic assay. This cutting-edge test looks deeper into your cancer cells to better identify people who may also benefit from chemotherapy with ER+ breast cancers. The decision to undergo chemotherapy, in addition to hormonal therapy, is a complicated one. Your medical oncologist uses many factors to help decide if you will benefit from chemotherapy. An Oncotype DX analysis of a portion of your breast cancer tissue can be instrumental in this decision.
Просмотров: 5251 Breast Cancer School for Patients
Case Study: Treating HR-Positive and HER2-Negative Breast Cancer
 
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In the second case study of the series, moderator Adam M. Brufsky, MD, PhD, describes a 63 year-old woman presenting with thickening of the outer left breast and an enlarging mass. Following Brufsky's description, the panelists describe their treatment approaches for this patient. To view more from this discussion, visit http://www.onclive.com/peer-exchange/MBC-challenges
Просмотров: 1253 OncLiveTV
Treatment for Early-Stage ER+ Breast Cancer
 
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Hope S. Rugo, MD, and Ruth O’Regan, MD, discuss adjuvant and neoadjuvant endocrine therapy as treatment for early-stage estrogen receptor(ER)–positive breast cancer.
Просмотров: 594 OncLiveTV
Estrogen Receptor Positive Breast Cancer. ER+. What is it?
 
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ER positive breast cancer means that the cancer cells grow and reproduce fast in response to the hormone estrogen. The diagnosis is based on the results of Immunohistochemistry assay. Assay is used to show whether or not the cancer cells have hormone receptors on their surface. Why is it important? When Estrogen gets attached to the receptor, it’s a signal to our DNA: start to grow and reproduce. (1)The more receptors cancer calls have, the stronger the signal. (2)The more Estrogen there is in the blood stream, the stronger the signal to the DNA. Hormone receptor status is important because oncologist will decide whether the cancer is likely to respond to hormonal therapy. Hormonal therapy includes medications that (1) block estrogen receptor, so Estrogen cannot sit there and send the signal to the DNA: grow and reproduce or (2) lower the amount of estrogen in the body. As a Naturopathic Physician I make sure that my patients do not consume estrogen-like substances. My specialty is: reduction of all types of cancer. Food, water and cosmetics, all should be free of chemicals Stay healthy Dr. V Waks
Просмотров: 4391 Doctor Veronica
HER2+/ER- Breast Cancer: Neoadjuvant Therapy Options
 
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Hope S. Rugo, MD, discusses the options for neoadjuvant therapy for the patient with HER2-positive breast cancer, stage T2bN1M0. For more resources and information regarding anticancer targeted therapies: http://targetedonc.com/
Просмотров: 181 Targeted Oncology
Less Chemotherapy for Breast Cancer: The TAILORx Results
 
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We teach you about the TAILORx clinical trial results and how this information may save many women in the future from chemotherapy. VISIT THE BREAST CANCER SCHOOL FOR PATIENTS: http://www.breastcancercourse.org LIST OF QUESTIONS FOR YOUR DOCTORS: http://www.breastcancercourse.org/breast-health-updates-latest-videos/ FOLLOW US: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Breast-Cancer-School-for-Patients-958519147618444/ _________________________________ Questions for your Breast Surgeon and Medical Oncologist: *Do I qualify for an Oncotype DX genomic test? *If so, will you order genomic testing for me? *What if I have an "Intermediate" result? *Do you follow the "TAILORx" trial recommendations? *Would you order a genomic test before I see a medical oncologist? What does the TAILORx Clinical Trial results mean to me? On June 3rd, 2018 the results of the largest breast cancer trial reported results that help us better determine who MAY benefit or MAY NOT benefit from chemotherapy in early stage, favorable breast cancers. The results help patients and physicians better interpret the results from the genomic assay, Oncotype DX, which is commonly used in the United States. The trial concludes that most patients with an "Intermediate Recurrence Score" result may avoid chemotherapy. The results were also released for publication by the New England Journal of Medicine. Journal Article Link: https://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa1804710 Video Outlining the TAILORx Clinical Trial: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=orwPgT0ZP_0&t=14s What is a genomic test? These sophisticated tests are performed on a small sample of cancer tissue in appropriate patients with early stage breast cancer. Genomic tests are usually ordered after surgery when the pathology report is finalized. It measures unique aspects of the tumor to determine if a patient will benefit from chemotherapy in addition to hormonal therapy. Such “genomic assays” developed over the last decade are a dramatic advance in breast cancer care. The Oncotype DX assay by Genomic Health Inc. is the most utilized genomic assay of those available in the United States. Who should consider a genomic test? Patients who have small “Estrogen receptor positive” (ER+) and “HER2 receptor negative” (HER2-) tumors and no evidence of cancer in their lymph nodes may benefit from an Oncotype DX assay. The purpose of this test is to better identify people who do and do not benefit from chemotherapy. The decision to undergo chemotherapy is a complicated one. Your medical oncologist will examine multiple factors to help determine if you will benefit from chemotherapy. The NCCN Guidelines, listed in the website links below, outline in much greater detail recommendations for the use of genomic tests. An Oncotype DX test can be instrumental in this decision for many patients. You may qualify for a Genomic Assay if… You have early stage cancer (Stage I or II) Your tumor is Estrogen receptor positive (ER+) Your tumor is Her2 receptor negative (HER2-) No cancer was found in your lymph nodes You are willing to consider having chemotherapy You are healthy enough to undergo chemotherapy How is chemotherapy tailored to patients? Genomic breast cancer tests are a leap forward in our ability to “look inside” breast cancer cells. Sophisticated breast cancer care is based upon the principle of providing maximal benefit from the least toxic therapy. Newly diagnosed breast cancer patients deserve the best information available to decide whether they need chemotherapy. Take our video lesson on “Will I Need Chemotherapy?“ (here) to understand the general concepts. Genomics is a promising and rapidly developing field. Take Home Message: Make sure to ask both your breast surgeon and medical oncologist if a genomic assay might play a role in your treatment decisions. For appropriate patients, these tests should be considered only one piece of the many “pieces of the puzzle” in deciding treatment decisions about chemotherapy and hormonal therapy.
Просмотров: 21499 Breast Cancer School for Patients
Will I Survive Breast Cancer? Learn About Your Risk
 
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We teach you how to understand the risk to your life from your breast cancer. Ask your breast cancer specialists about the specific threat for your unique cancer situation. VISIT THE BREAST CANCER SCHOOL FOR PATIENTS: http://www.breastcancercourse.org LIST OF QUESTIONS FOR YOUR DOCTORS: http://www.breastcancercourse.org/breast-health-updates-latest-videos/ FOLLOW US: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Breast-Cancer-School-for-Patients-958519147618444/ ______________________________________ Questions for your Breast Cancer Specialists: 1. Am I going to die of breast cancer? 2. What is the percentage chance I could die in the next 5 years? 3. Do factors like “triple negative receptors” or “HER2-positive receptors” or “my youth” make my chance of dying higher than the average statistics? 4. Will I die of breast cancer? This is a difficult question to answer early in your cancer care but it is still worth asking. Many people just diagnosed with cancer have no idea how much of a risk to their life their unique situation poses. Most breast cancers carry a low risk of recurrence, especially early stage cancers. The answer is usually reassuring. What is the chance I could die in the next 5 years? The average 5-year survival rate for all people with breast cancer is 89%. The 10-year rate is 83%; and the 15-year rate is 78%. If the cancer is located only in the breast (Stage I), the 5-year survival rate is 99%. More than 70% of breast cancers are diagnosed at an Early Stage. All survival statistics are primarily based on the stage of breast cancer when diagnosed. Some of the other important factors are also listed below that affect survival. Breast Cancer Stage is important: Non-invasive breast cancer Stage 0 breast cancer can be also described as a “pre-cancer.” If you have DCIS (Ductal Carcinoma In-situ) you can be quite confident you will do well. DCIS does not spread to other organs. What can be concerning is when an invasive cancer grows back in the area of a prior lumpectomy for DCIS. This type of local recurrence does carry a risk to your life. Luckily, this does not happen frequently. Also, be aware that those who have had DCIS in the past are at a higher risk for developing an entirely new, invasive breast cancer. Take our video lesson on “Non-Invasive DCIS“ (here) to learn more. Early Stage “Invasive breast cancer“ Stage I invasive breast cancer has an excellent survival rate. The chance of dying of Stage I breast cancer within five years of diagnosis is 1 to 5% if you pursue recommended treatments. Stage II breast cancer is also considered an early stage breast cancer. There is a slightly increased risk to your life versus a Stage I breast cancer. Altogether, the risk of Stage II breast cancer threatening your life in the next 5 years is about 15%. Later-Stage breast cancer (more advanced cancer) Stage III breast cancer has a higher risk to your life, with a 72% survival at 5 years. There are many individual and tumor specific factors that can change this survival rate. Inflammatory breast cancer is a more worrisome Stage III breast cancer. Overall, the 5-year survival rate for inflammatory breast cancer is about 50%. Stage IV breast cancer means that the cancer has spread beyond the breast to other organs or parts of the body. These metastases are not viewed in general to be curable. The treatment is aimed at helping people live longer with their cancer. This is the type of cancer carries up to 75 to 80% risk of dying within five years. What tumor factors threaten my life more? There are important “tumor biology” factors not well reflected in survival statistics by breast cancer “stage.” Below we list a few important factors that carry a higher risk to life beyond just the stage of cancer. “Triple Negative Receptor” breast cancer Triple negative breast cancer is considered a more aggressive breast cancer. Invariably it does require chemotherapy. If you have a triple negative breast cancer the risk of dying is higher than the standard statistics usually quoted for a particular stage of breast cancer (Stage I – IV). Learn more about “Triple Negative Breast Cancer“ with our video lesson (here) “HER2-Positive” breast cancer HER2-positive breast cancers are also more aggressive tumors. But the good news is that we now have incredibly effective, targeted chemotherapy and immunotherapy for HER2-positive cancers. Our video lesson covers “HER2-Positive Breast Cancer“ in more detail (here). Untreated breast cancer Untreated breast cancer obviously carries a higher risk of death than those who undergoing treatment. All survival statistics are based on breast cancer that underwent recommended treatment such as surgery, endocrine therapy, chemotherapy and radiation therapy. If you elect to not undergo standard treatment options, your chance of survival will be lower than the standard statistics for survival by stage.
Просмотров: 9199 Breast Cancer School for Patients
HER2 Positive Breast Cancer: Everything You Must Know
 
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We teach you why HER2-positive breast cancers are more threatening and educate you about new therapies such as targeted immunotherapy and neoadjuvant chemotherapy. VISIT THE BREAST CANCER SCHOOL FOR PATIENTS: http://www.breastcancercourse.org LIST OF QUESTIONS FOR YOUR DOCTORS: http://www.breastcancercourse.org/breast-health-updates-latest-videos/ FOLLOW US: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Breast-Cancer-School-for-Patients-958519147618444/ _____________________________ Questions for your Breast Surgeon and Medical Oncologist: 1. What is HER2-Positive breast cancer? 2. Will I need Chemo and Targeted Therapy? 3. What are the benefits of Neoadjuvant Chemo? 4. Isn’t Neoadjuvant Chemo recommended more now? 5. Should I consider a Clinical Trial? 6. What is “HER2-Positive” breast cancer? “HER2-Positive” breast cancers are fast growing tumors that more frequently spread beyond the breast to other parts of the body. Because of this, they are a bigger threat to your life than most other types of cancers with different receptor patterns. These cancers are called “HER2-positive” because they have too many HER2 protein receptors on their surface. These tiny proteins act like “light switches” to turn cancer cell growth “on.” Chemotherapy, combined with new, “targeted” drugs, are very effective against HER2-positive breast cancer and are a leap forward in breast cancer care. Your Breast Surgeon will know your “receptor pattern” within days after your initial breast biopsy. These results are often not communicated to you early on in your decision process. Although only 20% of breast cancers are “HER2-positive,” it is imperative that you specifically ask your surgeon immediately, and well before surgery, “What are my receptor results?” Take our lesson on “My Tumor Receptors” to learn more. Treated with Chemo and “Targeted Therapy” HER2 Receptor Positive (HER2+) tumors are incredibly responsive to chemotherapy when paired with new breakthrough drugs that target these cancers, such as Herceptin and Perjeta. The same holds true if a HER2+ tumor is also Estrogen Receptor positive (ER+). HER2+ tumors are more aggressive cancers, but we now can treat them more effectively, than in the past, with chemotherapy and “targeted immunotherapy” drugs that are designed to destroy them. Everyone with a HER2+ tumor larger than 5mm (1/4 inch) and in good health is considered for chemotherapy and targeted therapy. Unfortunately, studies have shown that many patients are not offered these standard of care, life-saving “targeted drugs” along with chemotherapy. You will make better treatment choices when you are well informed about HER2 therapies before meeting with your medical oncologist. You must inquire about Herceptin, Perjeta, and other “anti-HER2 drugs” that may be of benefit to you. Ask about the benefits of “Neoadjuvant Chemo” What is often overlooked are the benefits of offering neoadjuvant chemotherapy for patients with HER2-Positive, “Early-Stage” (1 & 2) breast cancers. There are distinct advantages (listed below) to having chemotherapy before surgery instead of afterwards. The decision to consider neoadjuvant chemotherapy always begins with your breast surgeon. Breast surgeons choose the initial direction of your entire breast cancer treatment plan. You must address this “cutting edge” treatment option well before surgery to benefit from neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Do not be afraid to ask. This is a very important question. Learn more about “Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy“ by taking our video lesson on the topic. The Potential Benefits of Neoadjuvant Chemo: *Begin life-saving chemotherapy earlier *Reduce the need for a mastectomy *Improve lumpectomy cosmetic outcomes *Reduce the need for an “Axillary Dissection” *Allows more time for BRCA genetic testing *More time to think about “lumpectomy vs. mastectomy” *Shows your cancer team if the chemo is working *Can possibly eliminate all cancer cells before surgery *Reduces the need for radiation after a mastectomy Ask if you might benefit from a Clinical Trial. New therapies must be studied in clinical trials to make sure they are safe and effective at treating breast cancer. HER2-positive breast cancers are currently the focus of intense clinical research. New drug treatments are rapidly being developed for this aggressive cancer. Less than 5% of all patients with breast cancer participate in clinical trials. Patients with cancer willing to participate in clinical trials are essential for the advancement of breast cancer care. Ask your medical oncologist if they offer or recommend you participate in a clinical trial for your unique breast cancer situation. Learn more about “Clinicial Trials“ at the Breast Cancer School for Patients.
Просмотров: 12195 Breast Cancer School for Patients
Breast Cancer | Dr. Tony Talebi discusses treatment of Stage 4 "triple negative" breast cancer
 
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Dr Tony Talebi interviews Dr Stefan Gluck regarding treatment of Stage IV triple negative breast cancer. Watch additional interviews on www.HemOnc101.com Breast cancer is the most common female cancer in the US, the second most common cause of cancer death in women, and the main cause of death in women ages 40 to 59. Important risk factors for breast cancer are age (older), gender (female), reproductive history (less children), hormonal factors (early menses and late menopause), and family history. Triple-negative breast cancer refers to any breast cancer that does not express the genes for estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR) or Her2/neu. Triple negative is sometimes used as a surrogate term for basal-like, however more detailed classification is possible providing better guidance for treatment and better estimates for prognosis. Standard treatment is surgery with adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy. As a variation neoadjuvant (before surgery) chemotherapy is very frequently used for triple negative breast cancers. This allows for a higher rate of breast conserving surgeries and by evaluating the response to the chemotherapy gives important clues about the individual responsiveness of the particular cancer to chemotherapy. Here, Dr Stephan Gluck discuses general the treatment of metastatic stage 4 triple negative breast cancer. Dr. Stephan Gluck is currently a professor of medicine at the University of Miami Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center. Dr. Gluck Credentials: -Associate Division Chief for Clinical Affairs, Division of Hematology/Oncology -Clinical Director, Braman Family Breast Cancer Institute Education: University of Toronto Toronto, Canada Fellowship Bone Marrow Transplant and Medical Oncology 1991 Heinrich Heine University Dusseldorf, Germany Chief Resident Internal Medicine 1987 Heinrich Heine University Dusseldorf, Germany Residency Internal Medicine 1986 RWTH Aachen Aachen, Germany Ph.D. Experimental Pharmacology 1980 Free University of West Berlin Berlin, Germany M.D. Internal Medicine 1978 Free University of West Berlin Berlin, Germany Rotating Internship Internal Medicine 1978 Ruhr Universitaet Bochum, Germany Undergraduate Pre-Clinical Sciences 1974
Просмотров: 1426 Tony Talebi, MD
Treatment Timeline for Breast Cancer: The Steps Ahead
 
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We teach you about the steps needed to diagnose and effectively treat your breast cancer. Know what comes next in your breast cancer journey. VISIT THE BREAST CANCER SCHOOL FOR PATIENTS: http://www.breastcancercourse.org LIST OF QUESTIONS FOR YOUR DOCTORS: http://www.breastcancercourse.org/breast-health-updates-latest-videos/ FOLLOW US: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Breast-Cancer-School-for-Patients-958519147618444/ __________________________________________ You have plenty of time to make decisions Making good decisions is the most difficult part of having breast cancer. You will feel pressed for time to learn everything and start your treatment as soon as possible. Time is usually on your side. You must work with your team to learn everything about your cancer and treatment options. We created the Breast Cancer School for Patients to quickly teach you to be your own expert in breast cancer. You will make better decisions once you become your own “expert” and best advocate. A few facts about time to treatment: The average time from the date of cancer diagnosis to the day of lumpectomy surgery is about 32 days. The average time to mastectomy surgery is about 40 days. It can take anywhere from 3 to 12 months from cancer diagnosis to complete your final treatments, and up to ten years if you need hormonal therapy. It is a marathon. Conserve your emotional and physical efforts for the challenges ahead. Finding your breast cancer (1 – 3 weeks) Most small breast cancers are found on screening mammography and possibly by ultrasound or maybe a breast MRI. You may have detected your own breast lump and sought further help from your physician. The time to schedule a mammogram, have it performed, return for further breast imaging and then get the results can take days to weeks. Always ask to have your tests and appointments scheduled as soon as possible. Getting a diagnosis: biopsy & results (2 – 14 days) Getting scheduled to have an image-guided breast biopsy by a breast surgeon or radiologist can vary. Most NAPBC accredited Breast Centers work quickly to schedule biopsies for those who might have a breast cancer. Our “Minimally Invasive Breast Biopsy“ lesson (here) outlines why needle biopsies are the standard of care. Make sure to ask (demand) that the physician who does your biopsy personally calls you with the results within a day or two. Call for your biopsy pathology results if you think there is a delay. My pathology report: (3 – 14 days) Ask for a copy of your initial biopsy report that will be available in 2-3 days. Ask for a copy of your final pathology report with your receptor results. Our courses on “My Pathology Report” and “My Receptors” offer more details. Surgery or chemotherapy first? Surgery is usually the first treatment for early stage breast cancer. Most patients will not need chemotherapy. If you have Estrogen receptor negative (ER-) or a “HER2-Positive“ tumor, then you will likely need chemotherapy either before or after surgery. There are distinct benefits to “Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy” before surgery. Take our video lessons linked to these topics. Is radiation needed? (4 – 6 weeks) Most patients that have a lumpectomy will need radiation. Whole breast radiation is the most common type and takes 4 to 6 weeks. Only a few patients that have a mastectomy will also need radiation. Patient-Friendly References: NCCN Guidelines for Patients www.nccn.org You will find well-organized guides (here) on breast cancer treatment by stage. Follow the prompts to breast cancer and then “stage” in the dropdown menus. The National Comprehensive Cancer Network is a consortium of organizations and governmental agencies to promote quality
Просмотров: 726 Breast Cancer School for Patients
Hormone Positive (ER+/PR) MBC - Dr. Katie Reeder Hayes - 2014 MBCN Conference at UNC
 
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Current diagnosis, treatment and management of Hormone sensitive metastatic breast cancer also called ER+/PR+ or ER+/PR- disease.
Просмотров: 1461 Metastatic Breast Cancer Network (MBCN)
What Are The Chances My Cancer Will Return After A Triple Negative Diagnosis? - Dr. Margileth
 
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Dr. Margileth defines a triple negative breast cancer as breast cancers that have negative estrogen receptor, negative progesterone receptor and negative HER2/neu gene. He further describes treatment options and risk of recurrence. Click Here & Get The 15 Breast Cancer Questions To Ask Your Doctor http://www.breastcanceranswers.com/what-breast-cancer-questions-to-ask/# Breast Cancer Answers is a social media show where viewers submit a question and get the answer from an expert. Submit your question now at, http://www.breastcanceranswers.com/ask. *** This information should not be relied upon as a substitute for personal medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Use the information provided on this site solely at your own risk.  If you have any concerns about your health, please consult with a physician.
Просмотров: 13102 Breast Cancer Answers®
Immunotherapy for Triple-Negative Breast Cancer
 
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Adam M. Brufsky, MD, PhD, FACP; Hope S. Rugo, MD; Lee Schwartzberg, MD, FACP; Komal Jhaveri, MD, FACP; and Francisco Esteva, MD, PhD, discuss the encouraging early results of clinical trials evaluating the use of checkpoint inhibitors and antibody-drug conjugates for patients with triple-negative breast cancer and the rationale for combining other agents to increase the presence of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes.
Просмотров: 958 OncLiveTV
Hormone Receptor-Positive and HER2-Positive Breast Cancer: A Medical Update
 
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Featuring Sara Hurvitz, MD, FACP, learn about the use of targeted therapies for early-stage, hormone receptor-positive and HER2-positive breast cancer, explore how these medicines reduce risk of recurrence and how they may be used before and after surgery.
Просмотров: 13668 Living Beyond Breast Cancer
ER+/HER2+ Metastatic Breast Cancer
 
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Hope S. Rugo, MD, looks at the use of CDK4/6 inhibitors for patients with metastatic ER-positive, HER2-positive breast cancer and the trials evaluating their use in this setting.
Просмотров: 642 OncLiveTV
Frontline Treatment of ER-Positive Breast Cancer
 
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In this segment, panelists discuss the frontline treatment of postmenopausal patients with ER-positive, HER2-negative metastatic breast cancer.
Просмотров: 699 OncLiveTV
CTC counts signal treatment choice in ER-positive/HER2-negative metastatic breast cancer
 
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Circulating tumor cell (CTC) counts could serve as a standalone biomarker for determining which patients with newly diagnosed estrogen receptor–positive, HER2-negative metastatic breast cancer are at high risk and should receive first-line chemotherapy and which are at low risk and could safely receive upfront hormonal therapy. Read the article here: https://www.mdedge.com/oncologypractice/article/190978/breast-cancer/ctc-counts-signal-treatment-choice-er-positive/her2
Early Stage HER2-positive Breast Cancer
 
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Dr. Denise Yardley of the Sarah Cannon Research Institute discusses treatment options for women with early stage breast cancer that is Her2-positive.
Просмотров: 4102 OMNIConnect
Ask for Answers: Will Chemotherapy Benefit Your Breast Cancer?
 
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Only 4 of 100 women with early-stage invasive breast cancer benefit from chemotherapy*, and its toxic nature can result in severe side effects. Oncotype DX is the only test that can help you find out if chemotherapy is the best treatment for you—or if there is another option that might suit you better. Oncotype DX gives you personalized information about your individual breast cancer diagnosis. This can be used to help tailor treatment for your breast cancer. The test is intended to be used for patients with early-stage, node-negative, estrogen receptor-positive (ER+) invasive breast cancer who will be treated with hormone therapy. Genomic Health is a global healthcare company that provides actionable genomic information to personalize cancer treatment decisions. For more information, please visit: www.genomichealth.com or www.oncotypedx.com. * Lancet 1996 Apr 20; 347(9008):1006-71
Просмотров: 126885 Genomic Health, Inc.
Katherine Drews-Elger, MD - Estrogen Receptor Negative Breast Cancer and the Immune System
 
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From the 2013 Expedition Inspiration Fund for Breast Cancer Research Annual Laura Evans Memorial Breast Cancer Symposium in Sun Valley, Idaho, at the Breast Cancer Research Update
Просмотров: 209 BreastCancerEI
Strategies for Selecting Therapy in HER2-Negative Breast Cancer - Coleman
 
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View the full video and download slides at http://www.primeoncology.org/online_education/solid_tumor/2012/breastwebcast_2012_vienna.aspx View an educational symposium webcast from the 2012 ESMO Congress in Vienna featuring Drs PierFranco Conte, Nadia Harbeck, Robert Coleman, and Michael Gnant discussing the implications of heterogeneity within HER2-negative breast cancers on clinical behavior and treatment selection and examining recent clinical trial data on the efficacy and safety of therapy for HER2-negative breast cancer, including endocrine therapy, chemotherapy, and targeted agents.
Просмотров: 181 prIME Oncology