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Asthma Pathophysiology
 
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Views: 312964 Armando Hasudungan
Asthma - causes, symptoms, diagnosis, treatment, pathology
 
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What is asthma? Asthma is characterized by chronic inflammation and asthma exacerbations, where an environmental trigger initiates inflammation, which makes it difficult to breathe. Find more videos at http://osms.it/more. Hundreds of thousands of current & future clinicians learn by Osmosis. We have unparalleled tools and materials to prepare you to succeed in school, on board exams, and as a future clinician. Sign up for a free trial at http://osms.it/more. Subscribe to our Youtube channel at http://osms.it/subscribe. Get early access to our upcoming video releases, practice questions, giveaways, and more when you follow us on social media: Facebook: http://osms.it/facebook Twitter: http://osms.it/twitter Instagram: http://osms.it/instagram Our Vision: Everyone who cares for someone will learn by Osmosis. Our Mission: To empower the world’s clinicians and caregivers with the best learning experience possible. Learn more here: http://osms.it/mission Medical disclaimer: Knowledge Diffusion Inc (DBA Osmosis) does not provide medical advice. Osmosis and the content available on Osmosis's properties (Osmosis.org, YouTube, and other channels) do not provide a diagnosis or other recommendation for treatment and are not a substitute for the professional judgment of a healthcare professional in diagnosis and treatment of any person or animal. The determination of the need for medical services and the types of healthcare to be provided to a patient are decisions that should be made only by a physician or other licensed health care provider. Always seek the advice of a physician or other qualified healthcare provider with any questions you have regarding a medical condition.
Views: 190094 Osmosis
Acute Asthma
 
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Pathophysiology and managment of acute asthma exacerbation. This is a pilot video series. Meant for pediatrics residents as a quick review, with emphasis on why disease presents the way it does and why evidence-based interventions are effective. Feedback: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/Q253LRC
Views: 4808 fischbuch
Asthma pathophysiology | Respiratory system diseases | NCLEX-RN | Khan Academy
 
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Created by Amy Fan. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/test-prep/nclex-rn/rn-respiratory-system-diseases/rn-asthma/v/asthma-diagnosis?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=Nclex-rn Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/test-prep/nclex-rn/rn-respiratory-system-diseases/rn-asthma/v/what-is-asthma?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=Nclex-rn NCLEX-RN on Khan Academy: A collection of questions from content covered on the NCLEX-RN. These questions are available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 United States License (available at http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/us/). About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s NCLEX-RN channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCDx5cTeADCvKWgF9x_Qjz3g?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 264774 khanacademymedicine
Asthma - Pathophysiology
 
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This video presents following topic Definition of Asthma Triad of Events Types Pathogenesis Role of allergens Role of Mast cells, T Cells, and B cells. Role of eosinophils, and neutrophils. Role of IL4, IL5, and other cytokines. Role of various chemokines. Airway Remodeling Clinical Aspects
Asthma and COPD - Pathogenesis and Pathophysiology
 
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A review of the pathology of asthma and COPD, including the role of the immune system, along with the mechanisms behind the hypercapnia and hypoxemia of COPD, and the blue bloater vs. pink puffer pseudodichotomy.
Views: 41455 Strong Medicine
Asthma Treatment, Symptoms, Pathophysiology, Nursing Interventions NCLEX Review Lecture
 
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Asthma treatment (asthma attack), symptoms, pathophysiology nursing NCLEX review lecture. This lecture will detail the pathophysiology of asthma along with the early warning signs vs active signs of an asthma attack. In addition to a sample asthma action plan along with using a peak flow meter to monitor asthma, asthma triggers, nursing interventions for asthma, and all the medications used to treat asthma, which are bronchodilators and anti-inflammatory medications. What is asthma? Asthma is a chronic lung disease (no cure) that causes narrowing and inflammation of the airways (bronchi and bronchioles) that leads to difficulty breathing. How does it happen? Normally, when you breathe in air, it travels down through your upper airway to your lower airway, which includes the trachea, bronchi, bronchioles, and alveoli (where gas exchanges happens). The oxygen you breathe in crosses over into your blood stream, and the carbon dioxide in your blood crosses over into the airway to be exhaled. In patients with asthma, the bronchi and bronchioles are chronically inflamed and can become so inflamed that it leads to an asthma attack (wheezing, chest tightness, shortness of breath, coughing), which is usually due to a trigger of some type. Asthma triggers include: -Environment: smoke, pollen, pollution, perfumes, dander, dust mites, pests (cockroaches), cold and dry air, mold -Body Issue: respiratory infection, GERD, hormonal shifts, exercise-induced -Intake of Certain Substances: drugs (beta adrenergic blockers that are nonselective), NSAIDS, aspirin, preservatives (sulfites) Signs and Symptoms of an asthma attack include: chest tightness, wheezing (auscultate…expiratory wheezing and can progress to inspiratory wheezes in severe cases), coughing, difficulty breathing (***especially exhaling), increased respiratory rate Asthma treatment includes: bronchodilators (beta-agonists, anticholinergics, theophylline along with anti-inflammatories (corticosteroids, leukotriene modifiers, immunomodulators, cromolyn). Asthma NCLEX questions: http://www.registerednursern.com/asthma-nclex-questions/ Notes: http://www.registerednursern.com/asthma-nclex-review/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/registerednursern_com/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/RegisteredNurseRNs Subscribe: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=registerednursern Nursing School Supplies: http://www.registerednursern.com/the-ultimate-list-of-nursing-medical-supplies-and-items-a-new-nurse-student-nurse-needs-to-buy/ Popular Playlists: NCLEX Reviews: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfWtwCDmLHyX2UeHofCIcgo0 Fluid & Electrolytes: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfWJSZ9pL8L3Q1dzdlxUzeKv Nursing Skills: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfUhd_qQYEbp0Eab3uUKhgKb Nursing School Study Tips: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfWBO40qeDmmaMwMHJEWc9Ms Nursing School Tips & Questions" https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfVQok-t1X5ZMGgQr3IMBY9M Teaching Tutorials: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfUkW_DpJekN_Y0lFkVNFyVF Types of Nursing Specialties: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfW8dRD72gUFa5W7XdfoxArp Healthcare Salary Information: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfVN0vmEP59Tx2bIaB_3Qhdh New Nurse Tips: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfVTqH6LIoAD2zROuzX9GXZy Nursing Career Help: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfVXjptWyvj2sx1k1587B_pj EKG Teaching Tutorials: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfU-A9UTclI0tOYrNJ1N5SNt Dosage & Calculations for Nurses: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfUYdl0TZQ0Tc2-hLlXlHNXq Diabetes Health Managment: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfXtEx17D7zC1efmWIX-iIs9
Views: 155594 RegisteredNurseRN
Asthma, Animation.
 
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Pathology of Asthma, Triggers of Asthmatic Attacks, Treatments and Associated Conditions. This video and other animations (in HD) for patient education are available for instant download licensing here: https://www.alilamedicalmedia.com/-/galleries/all-animations/respiratory-system-videos ©Alila Medical Media. All rights reserved. Support us on Patreon and get FREE downloads and other great rewards: patreon.com/AlilaMedicalMedia All images/videos by Alila Medical Media are for information purposes ONLY and are NOT intended to replace professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always seek the advice of a qualified healthcare provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Asthma is a chronic respiratory condition where the airways in the lungs are inflamed and narrowed causing breathlessness, wheezing, chest tightness and coughing. Symptoms come as recurrent episodes known as asthmatic attacks most commonly at night or early in the morning. Pathology of asthma: The lungs contain millions of air tubes or airways, called bronchi and bronchioles, which bring air in and out of the body. The airways have a layer of smooth muscle in their wall which enables them to constrict or dilate. In people suffering from asthma these airways are inflamed, narrowed and become more sensitive to certain substances. Asthmatic attack, or exacerbation, happens when the airways react to these substances. During an attack, the smooth muscle contracts, squeezing the airways, making them even narrower; mucus secretion is also increased which further obstructs the airways. Asthma is most commonly considered as an inflammatory response disease where the body’s immune system over-reacts to certain environmental agents. Causes of asthma are complex and not fully understood but likely involve a combination of genetic and environmental factors. Family history is a known risk factor for asthma. There are at least over twenty genes associated with asthma of which many are involved in the immune system. Triggers are factors that initiate the attack. Common triggers include: - allergens, such as pollen, animal fur, pet dander, sulfites in preserved food.. - irritants, such as cigarette smoke, industrial chemicals, dust, household chemicals,.. - medications, such as aspirin, beta blockers,.. - physical activities, exercises. There is no cure for asthma. The most effective way to manage symptoms is to identify the triggers of asthmatic attacks and avoid them. There are two main classes of medication: - Bronchodilators - substances that dilate bronchi and bronchioles - are used as short-term relief of symptoms. - Inflammation moderators such as corticosteroids are taken as long-term treatments. Asthma inhalers are used to deliver the medication to the lungs. A number of conditions tend to occur more frequently in people with asthma and should be taken into account when treating asthma: - Allergies, such as eczema and hay fever. These individuals are considered hyper-allergic – they have high tendency to develop allergic reactions. The combination of these conditions is known as atopy or atopic syndrome. Immunotherapy may be recommended for this group of patients. - Gastroesophageal reflux disease or GERD - a condition in which stomach acid backs up and damages the mucosal lining of the esophagus. GERD may worsen asthma symptoms and medications for asthma often worsen GERD symptoms. Treating GERD usually improves asthma and must be included in an asthma treatment plan. - Obstructive sleep apnea or OSA – obstruction of the airway at the throat level during sleep. Asthmatic patients are at higher risks of developing OSA. The mechanism of this association is largely unknown. - Sinusitis: inflammation of paranasal sinuses. Sinusitis commonly worsens asthma symptoms and makes treatments less effective.
Views: 84133 Alila Medical Media
Acute Asthma | أزمة حساسية الصدر
 
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DocToon Facebook Page : https://www.facebook.com/DocToon.Page
Views: 14402 DocToon
Asthma for USMLE Step 2
 
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Asthma will be discussed, in particular its pathophysiology, causes, sign and symptoms chronic management and management of acute exacerbation. This handwritten asthma lecture is for medical students planning on taking the USMLE. Asthma is defined based on it pathophysiology, airway inflammation and intermitten obstruction due to bronchial hyperresonsive. This is typically mediated by mast cells, eosinophils and other markers which leads to airway edema and mucus plug. This obstruction increases restriction and decreased expiratory flow rate. Therefore asthma is considered an obstructive disease. CAUSES Environmental allergen Viral infection such as rhinovirus and RSV Sinusitis Exercise induced GERD - acid in esophagus trigger vagus response and bronchoconstriction Aspirin induced increase leukotrienes leading to bronchoconstriction Obesity Occupational Exposure Emotional CLINICAL SIGN AND SYMPTOMS OF ASTHMA Begins at any age, but generally diagnosed before 7 years old and remit at adolescents. Cough - nonproductive, paroxysmal in night and early morning Chest Tightness and Chest Pain Wheeze which is initially end expiratory then present in entire expiration and then present on expiration and inspiration. Finally silent chest which is an emergency. Tachypnea initially and when severe hypoventilation with use of accessory muscles (Sternucleiodomastoid). Pulsus parodoxus where on inspiration there is a drop in blood pressure. Asthma patients also become breathless and can only speak in phrases and words. EVALUATION Astham can be diagnosed by clinical findings. Also use spirometry and rule out other alternatives. Bronchoprovocation test is the gold standard by giving asthma patient methacholine and mannitol or exercise and wait for symptoms to occur. If positive need to rule our COPD, rhinitis and other causes. However, negative rules out asthma. In spirometry the asthma patient pushes out air in one second (FEV1) and the ratio of FEV1/FVC is less than 80%. And asthma will be reversed with bronchodilator and the COPD, Emphysema and Bronchiectasis is not reversible. The peak expiratory flow monitor will be low in asthma patients. Patient should be greater than 80% of peak value depending on values in chart. Blood and sputum eosinophils tend to be greater than 4% in asthma and if greater than 8% there are more differentials. Also helps guide therapy. Chest X-ray in asthma patients is normal, but it helps rule out other causes. STAGING Intermittent asthma, the patient is asymptomatic between exacerbations. Will have less than 2 episodes per week and 2 night episodes per month. Normal Activity Level. Severe exacerbation defined as requirement of oral glucocorticoid less than once a year. FEV1 is greater than 80% Mild Persistent asthma the patient has 2-6 episodes per week, 3-4 nights out of the month. Moderate persistent asthma the patient has daily episodes and more than 1 night symptom a week. Some acitivity limitation. FEV1 is between 60-80% and the FEV1/FVC ratio is decreased by 5% Severe persistent asthma the patient has symptoms throughout the day and night symptoms every night. Severe Activity limitation. Acute exacerbation of asthma more than 2 times a year. FEV1 is less than 60% and FEV1/FVC is decreased by more than 5%. MANAGEMENT of ASTHMA Education has decreased mortality the most with discussion of asthma action plan and avoiding triggers. Step system for asthma management a step up is required with 2 days a week requirement of SABA and step down with well controlled for 3 months. Step 1 - Short Acting Beta Agonist (SABA) as needed Step 2 - Low dose Inhaled Corticosteroids (ICS) Daily Step 3 - Low dose ICS and LABA Step 4 - LABA and Medium dose ICS Step 5 - LABA and High Dose ICS and omalizumab Step 6 - LABA and High Dose ICS and Oral Glucocorticoid and Omalizumab due to allergies Alternative to LABA is LTRA, Zileuton, and Theophylline. MANAGEMENT OF ACUTE EXACERBATION OF ASTHMA If Peak Expiratory Flow is 50-79% then take 2-6 puffs of SABA 3 times ever 20 minutes and repeat PEF. If better continue SABA and change medication. If doesn't improve, take Oral glucocorticoids continue SABA and change medications. If Less than 50% then go to emergency Department. Managing asthmatic patient in emergency department is first by doing physical examination to confirm asthma. Start management with oxygen. If cannot reach greater than 90% then intubate and admit to ICU. Otherwise start SABA and if PEF is less than 40% start with SABA, Ipratropium and oral Glucocorticoid. Reassess with PEF and if improving (70%) then observe and discharge. If not improving then admit into wards monitor vitals. If worsening admit to ICU and give IV glucocorticoids and mechanical ventilation.
Views: 8886 the study spot
3D Asthma Medical Animation (Symptoms, Causes and Modern  Treatment Techniques)
 
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This new 3D medical animation provides a general overview of asthma, its symptoms, causes and treatment for this clinical condition of the upper respiratory airways. The video includes details related to symptoms of asthma, as well as its causes and treatment. Here are our web pages with overview of asthma: - http://www.normalbreathing.com/diseases-Asthma.php (in English) - http://www.respiracionnormal.org/asma/ (in Spanish). If you like this 3d medical animation, share this video URL on your Facebook, Google plus, Twitter, and other social networks. Asthma is a lung disease that is accompanied by inflammation and narrowing of the airways. It can be managed with medication, avoidance of triggers, elimination of inflammation, and breathing exercises that increase amounts of CO2 (carbon dioxide) in the airways and alveoli, as this 3d animation video explains. As some official medical sources from the NHS (www.nhs.uk/conditions/asthma/) claim, "Asthma ... can be managed but not cured". However, these medical sources in their YouTube 3D animations and videos do not provide educational details about the treatment of asthma using the Buteyko breathing exercises. This therapy was tested in 6 controlled randomized clinical trials conducted in Western countries. More about clinical trials http://www.normalbreathing.com/buteyko.php/ . Bronchospasm, due to asthma, is caused by 3 factors: - Swelling of cells in the lining of airways due to chronic inflammation - Constriction of smooth muscles that are located around bronchi and bronchioles (also known as bronchoconstriction) - Production of additional mucus (or phlegm) due to inflammation and triggers of asthma. As a result, asthmatics suffer from these classical symptoms of asthma - wheezing (whistling or rattling sounds in the chest) - coughing - chest tightness - difficulty breathing. More about symptoms of asthma in 3d video: - http://www.normalbreathing.com/c/asthma-symptoms.php (in English) Bronchospasm causes: http://www.respiracionnormal.org/broncoespasmo/ (in Spanish). Common asthma triggers include following factors: pollen, house dust mites, mold, cigarette smoke, and pet dander. However, there are many other factors that can trigger an asthma attack. These include lower respiratory infections, overeating, anxiety, psychological stress, exercise, and even laughter. Acute asthma exacerbations (asthma attacks) and even deaths are most likely to occur during early morning hours or from about 4 to 7 am during sleep. There are two lifestyle factors that dramatically increase chances of these problems at night. These are: - sleeping on the back (supine sleep) - and mouth breathing. The common approach to asthma is to use bronchodilator medication (such as Ventolin) that relaxes the smooth muscles of airways and dilates them allowing easier air flow. Bronchospasm can be reversed with avoidance of triggers or elimination of inflammation. Apart from using medication, 6 randomized controlled clinical trials showed that people with asthma can reduce or eliminate their symptoms of asthma and main bronchodilator medications by about 90% using breathing exercises to slow down breathing back to the medical norms. This method of alternative medicine is called the Buteyko breathing technique. It has rating from the British Thoracic Society showing much higher efficiency of this method for asthma than yoga, meditation, nutritional intervention, or any other tested complementary therapy, as we explained in 3D animation above. Our YouTube Channel: http://www.youtube.com/user/artour2006 The URL for this video is: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EsjnGYoi6_4/ . This 3D animation video was created by Dr. Artour Rakhimov, an international educator, author of 11 Amazon books, and the creator of www.NormalBreathing.com. Music "The Curtain Rises" Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 3D Share this great 3D medical animation video.
Views: 93072 Dr Artour Rakhimov
Asthma and COPD: Acute Exacerbations
 
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How to identify and treat acute exacerbations of asthma and COPD. Included is a discussion of antibiotics, the use of peak flow meters, possible worsening of hypercapnia with oxygen therapy, and the association between COPD and pulmonary embolisms.
Views: 25588 Strong Medicine
Inhalers (Asthma & COPD Treatment) Explained Clearly
 
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Join Dr. Seheult of https://www.medcram.com as he clarifies the inhalers and progression used for asthma and COPD treatment. Understand the difference in naming and usage of SABA inhalers (short acting beta agonists, LABA inhalers (long acting beta agonists), ICS (inhaled corticosteroids), and LAMAs (long acting muscarinic receptor antagonists). This video provides a concise overview of the step up inhaler treatment for both asthma and COPD. Includes discussion of albuterol, salmeterol, fluticasone, tiotropium, and many others. Visit https://www.MedCram.com for this entire course and over 100 free lectures. This is the home for ALL MedCram.com medical videos (many medical videos, medical lectures, and quizzes are not on YouTube). Speaker: Roger Seheult, MD Co-Founder of MedCram.com (https://www.medcram.com) Clinical and Exam Preparation Instructor Board Certified in Internal Medicine, Pulmonary Disease, Critical Care, and Sleep Medicine. MedCram: Medical education topics explained clearly including: Respiratory lectures such as Asthma and COPD. Renal lectures on Acute Renal Failure and Adrenal Gland. Internal medicine videos on Oxygen Hemoglobin Dissociation Curve and Medical Acid Base. A growing library on critical care topics such as Shock, Diabetic Ketoacidosis (DKA), and Mechanical Ventilation. Cardiology videos on Hypertension, ECG / EKG Interpretation, and heart failure. VQ Mismatch and Hyponatremia lectures have been popular among medical students and physicians. The Pulmonary Function Tests (PFTs) videos and Ventilator associated pneumonia bundles and lectures have been particularly popular with RTs. NPs and PAs have given great feedback on Pneumonia Treatment and Liver Function Tests among many others. Many nursing students have found the Asthma and shock lectures very helpful. Subscribe to the official MedCram.com YouTube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=medcramvideos Recommended Audience - medical professionals and medical students: including physicians, nurse practitioners, physician assistants, nurses, respiratory therapists, EMT and paramedics, and many others. Review and test prep for USMLE, MCAT, PANCE, NCLEX, NAPLEX, NBDE, RN, RT, MD, DO, PA, NP school and board examinations. More from MedCram.com medical videos: MedCram Website: https://www.medcram.com Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MedCram Google+: https://plus.google.com/u/1/+Medcram Twitter: https://twitter.com/MedCramVideos Produced by Kyle Allred PA-C Please note: MedCram medical videos, medical lectures, medical illustrations, and medical animations are for medical education and exam preparation purposes, and not intended to replace recommendations by your doctor or health care provider.
Asthma
 
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These videos do not provide medical advice and are for informational purposes only. The videos are not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always seek the advice of a qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read or seen in any Khan Academy video. More free lessons at: http://www.khanacademy.org/video?v=SGKHQqHXmpQ
Views: 43618 khanacademymedicine
Asthma Explained Clearly
 
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Understand asthma with this clear explanation by Dr. Roger Seheult of http://www.medcram.com. Includes discussion on asthma pathophysiology, signs and symptoms of asthma, diagnosis, triggers (GERD, post nasal drip, down feathers, etc.), flow volume loops, samter's triad, and more. This is video 1 of 2 on asthma and treatment. Speaker: Roger Seheult, MD Clinical and Exam Preparation Instructor Board Certified in Internal Medicine, Pulmonary Disease, Critical Care, and Sleep Medicine. MedCram: Medical topics explained clearly including: Asthma, COPD, Acute Renal Failure, Mechanical Ventilation, Oxygen Hemoglobin Dissociation Curve, Hypertension, Shock, Diabetic Ketoacidosis (DKA), Medical Acid Base, VQ Mismatch, Hyponatremia, Liver Function Tests, Pulmonary Function Tests (PFTs), Adrenal Gland, Pneumonia Treatment, any many others. New topics are often added weekly- please subscribe to help support MedCram and become notified when new videos have been uploaded. Subscribe: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=medcramvideos Recommended Audience: Health care professionals and medical students: including physicians, nurse practitioners, physician assistants, nurses, respiratory therapists, EMT and paramedics, and many others. Review for USMLE, MCAT, PANCE, NCLEX, NAPLEX, NDBE, RN, RT, MD, DO, PA, NP school and board examinations. More from MedCram: Complete Video library: https://www.youtube.com/c/medcram Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MedCram Google+: https://plus.google.com/u/1/+Medcram Twitter: https://twitter.com/MedCramVideos Produced by Kyle Allred PA-C Please note: MedCram medical videos, medical lectures, medical illustrations, and medical animations are for medical educational and exam preparation purposes, and not intended to replace recommendations by your health care provider.
USMLE ALGORITHMS: Asthma Exacerbation
 
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This video explains what to do to manage a patient presenting with an Asthma Exacerbation. ENJOY!
Views: 28133 josephmedman
Acute Asthma
 
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Book Chapter - http://www.paediatricemergencies.com/index.php/2015/04/19/acute-asthma/ This episode covers the management of child presenting to the Emergency Department with Life Threatening Asthma who needs intensive care support. Dr Christopher Flannigan, a Paediatric Intensivist from the United Kingdom, provides advice on resuscitation and stabilisation of the child prior to care being taken over by the paediatric intensive care team. This podcast is part of the 'Waiting for the Paediatric Retrieval Team' series and the accompanying book chapter can be viewed by clicking on the above link. The videos are also available as podcasts at http://paediatricemergencies.podbean.com/feed/ Check out the accompanying 'Paediatric Emergencies' App available at iOS https://itunes.apple.com/gb/app/paediatric-emergencies/id494905887?mt=8 Android https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.itdcs.paediatricemergency
Acute Management of Asthma - A Presentation by Dr Ninian Hewitt
 
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Dr Ninian Hewitt presents on acute asthma management at SARA's second education day, Focus on Asthma Management. 4th June, COSLA Conference Centre, Edinburgh
asthma exacerbation
 
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Views: 682 sport 24
What happens during an asthma attack?
 
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This video follows a young man as he suffers an asthma attack. Warning: contains scenes that some viewers may find upsetting. Courtesy of the Department of Health South Australia https://www.asthma.org.uk/sign-up/ Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/AsthmaUK/ Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/asthmauk #asthma #asthmaattack
Views: 1184827 Asthma UK
Asthma 02: Treatment
 
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Treatment of asthma... the various medications for a severe exacerbation.
Views: 2645 Rahul Patwari
Asthma Exacerbation
 
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Asthma Exacerbation
What is ACUTE SEVERE ASTHMA? What does ACUTE SEVERE ASTHMA mean? ACUTE SEVERE ASTHMA meaning
 
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What is ACUTE SEVERE ASTHMA? What does ACUTE SEVERE ASTHMA mean? ACUTE SEVERE ASTHMA meaning - ACUTE SEVERE ASTHMA definition - ACUTE SEVERE ASTHMA explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. Acute severe asthma (also referred to in Latin as status asthmaticus, or asthmatic status) is an acute exacerbation of asthma that does not respond to standard treatments of bronchodilators (inhalers) and steroids. Symptoms include chest tightness, rapidly progressive dyspnea (shortness of breath), dry cough, use of accessory respiratory muscles, labored breathing, and extreme wheezing. It is a life-threatening episode of airway obstruction and is considered a medical emergency. Complications include cardiac and/or respiratory arrest. It is characterized histologically by smooth muscle hypertrophy and basement membrane thickening. An exacerbation (attack) of asthma is experienced as a worsening of asthma symptoms with breathlessness and cough (often worse at night). In acute severe asthma, breathlessness may be so severe that it is impossible to speak more than a few words (inability to complete sentences). On examination, the respiratory rate may be elevated (more than 25 breaths per minute), and the heart rate may be rapid (110 beats per minute or faster). Reduced oxygen saturation levels (but above 92%) are often encountered. Examination of the lungs with a stethoscope may reveal reduced air entry and/or widespread wheeze. The peak expiratory flow can be measured at the bedside; in acute severe asthma the flow is less than 50% a person's normal or predicted flow. Very severe acute asthma (termed "near-fatal" as there is an immediate risk to life) is characterised by a peak flow of less than 33% predicted, oxygen saturations below 92% or cyanosis (blue discoloration, usually of the lips), absence of audible breath sounds over the chest ("silent chest"), reduced respiratory effort and visible exhaustion or drowsiness. Irregularities in the heart beat and abnormal lowering of the blood pressure may be observed. Inflammation in asthma is characterized by an influx of eosinophils during the early-phase reaction and a mixed cellular infiltrate composed of eosinophils, mast cells, lymphocytes, and neutrophils during the late-phase (or chronic) reaction. The simple explanation for allergic inflammation in asthma begins with the development of a predominantly helper T2 lymphocyte–driven, as opposed to helper T1 lymphocyte–driven, immune milieu, perhaps caused by certain types of immune stimulation early in life. This is followed by allergen exposure in a genetically susceptible individual. Specific allergen exposure (e.g., dust mites) under the influence of helper T2 lymphocytes leads to B-lymphocyte elaboration of immunoglobulin E (IgE) antibodies specific to that allergen. The IgE antibody attaches to surface receptors on airway mucosal mast cells. One important question is whether atopic individuals with asthma, in contrast to atopic persons without asthma, have a defect in mucosal integrity that makes them susceptible to penetration of allergens into the mucosa. Subsequent specific allergen exposure leads to cross-bridging of IgE molecules and activation of mast cells, with elaboration and release of a vast array of mediators. These mediators include histamine; leukotrienes C4, D4, and E4; and a host of cytokines. Together, these mediators cause bronchial smooth muscle constriction, vascular leakage, inflammatory cell recruitment (with further mediator release), and mucous gland secretion. These processes lead to airway obstruction by constriction of the smooth muscles, edema of the airways, influx of inflammatory cells, and formation of intraluminal mucus. In addition, ongoing airway inflammation is thought to cause the airway hyperreactivity characteristic of asthma. The more severe the airway obstruction, the more likely ventilation-perfusion mismatching will result in impaired gas exchange and hypoxemia. Interventions include intravenous (IV) medications (e.g magnesium sulfate), aerosolized medications, and positive-pressure therapy, including mechanical ventilation. Multiple therapies may be used simultaneously to rapidly reverse the effects of status asthmaticus and reduce permanent damage of the airways. Intravenous and aerosolized treatments such as corticosteroids and methylxanthines are often given. According to a new randomized control trial ketamine and aminophylline are also effective in children with acute asthma who responds poorly to standard therapy.
Views: 1231 The Audiopedia
Asthma Attack, Treatment, Pathophysiology and Symptoms
 
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Asthma is a condition in which your airways narrow and swell and produce extra mucus. This can make breathing difficult and trigger coughing, wheezing and shortness of breath.
What Severe Asthma Looks Like | WebMD
 
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Here's a fascinating look at what happens inside your body during a severe asthma attack -- and what the symptoms may look like from the outside.
Views: 2095 WebMD
Pediatric Severe Asthma in the ED | 2018 EM & Acute Care Course
 
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Register for the live course or purchase the self-study program at www.emacourse.com. Using primarily the Emergency Medical Abstracts (EMA) database of over 17,000 abstracts, 28 presentations, each of 30-minute duration, are presented along with four 90-minute faculty panels. The focus of the course is the new, the controversial and the provocative. The course faculty synthesize the literature and combine it with their clinical experience to provide participants with specific recommendations regarding diagnosis and therapy related to emergency care.
Asthma | Nursing Care for Asthma Patient in 2 Minutes
 
04:27
Nursing care for the asthma patient including medications, interventions, and assessment findings. Everything the nursing student needs to know to ace the NCLEX on asthma questions in under five minutes. Tired of professors who don't seem to care, confusing lectures, and taking endless NCLEX® review questions? . . . Welcome to NRSNG.com | Where Nurses Learn . . . Prepare to DEMOLISH the NCLEX. Blog: http://www.NRSNG.com Apps: http://www.RNcrush.com | http://www.Simclex.com Books: http://www.NursingStudentBooks.com Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/NRSNG Visit us at http://www.nrsng.com/medical-information-disclaimer/ for disclaimer information. NCLEX®, NCLEX-RN® are registered trademarks of the National Council of State Boards of Nursing, INC. and hold no affiliation with NRSNG.
Views: 27120 NRSNG
Pneumonia - causes, symptoms, diagnosis, treatment, pathology
 
11:15
What is pneumonia? Pneumonia is an infection of the lungs that can be caused by a variety of different pathogens, including viruses, bacteria, fungi, and mycobacteria. Find more videos at http://osms.it/more. Hundreds of thousands of current & future clinicians learn by Osmosis. We have unparalleled tools and materials to prepare you to succeed in school, on board exams, and as a future clinician. Sign up for a free trial at http://osms.it/more. Subscribe to our Youtube channel at http://osms.it/subscribe. Get early access to our upcoming video releases, practice questions, giveaways, and more when you follow us on social media: Facebook: http://osms.it/facebook Twitter: http://osms.it/twitter Instagram: http://osms.it/instagram Our Vision: Everyone who cares for someone will learn by Osmosis. Our Mission: To empower the world’s clinicians and caregivers with the best learning experience possible. Learn more here: http://osms.it/mission Medical disclaimer: Knowledge Diffusion Inc (DBA Osmosis) does not provide medical advice. Osmosis and the content available on Osmosis's properties (Osmosis.org, YouTube, and other channels) do not provide a diagnosis or other recommendation for treatment and are not a substitute for the professional judgment of a healthcare professional in diagnosis and treatment of any person or animal. The determination of the need for medical services and the types of healthcare to be provided to a patient are decisions that should be made only by a physician or other licensed health care provider. Always seek the advice of a physician or other qualified healthcare provider with any questions you have regarding a medical condition.
Views: 264100 Osmosis
Type I hypersensitivity (IgE-mediated hypersensitivity) - causes, symptoms, pathology
 
09:02
What is type I hypersensitivity? Type I hypersensitivity, or sometimes IgE-mediated hypersensitivity or immediate hypersensitivity, is a type of immune reaction in which tissue is damaged due to IgE antibody. Find more videos at http://osms.it/more. Hundreds of thousands of current & future clinicians learn by Osmosis. We have unparalleled tools and materials to prepare you to succeed in school, on board exams, and as a future clinician. Sign up for a free trial at http://osms.it/more. Subscribe to our Youtube channel at http://osms.it/subscribe. Get early access to our upcoming video releases, practice questions, giveaways, and more when you follow us on social media: Facebook: http://osms.it/facebook Twitter: http://osms.it/twitter Instagram: http://osms.it/instagram Our Vision: Everyone who cares for someone will learn by Osmosis. Our Mission: To empower the world’s clinicians and caregivers with the best learning experience possible. Learn more here: http://osms.it/mission Medical disclaimer: Knowledge Diffusion Inc (DBA Osmosis) does not provide medical advice. Osmosis and the content available on Osmosis's properties (Osmosis.org, YouTube, and other channels) do not provide a diagnosis or other recommendation for treatment and are not a substitute for the professional judgment of a healthcare professional in diagnosis and treatment of any person or animal. The determination of the need for medical services and the types of healthcare to be provided to a patient are decisions that should be made only by a physician or other licensed health care provider. Always seek the advice of a physician or other qualified healthcare provider with any questions you have regarding a medical condition.
Views: 504322 Osmosis
BRONCHIAL ASTHMA (PATHOGENESIS)
 
09:51
Medicaine is back with the pathogenesis of bronchial asthma. Hope you will like it, if you do like,share and subscribe to my channel and support me. THANK YOU AND HAPPY LEARNING!!!!
Views: 1235 MEDICAINE
Inflammatory response | Human anatomy and physiology | Health & Medicine | Khan Academy
 
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Overview of the inflammatory response. Created by Sal Khan. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/science/health-and-medicine/human-anatomy-and-physiology/introduction-to-immunology/v/rn-blood-cell-lineages?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=healthandmedicine Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/science/health-and-medicine/human-anatomy-and-physiology/introduction-to-immunology/v/how-white-blood-cells-move-around?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=healthandmedicine Health & Medicine on Khan Academy: No organ quite symbolizes love like the heart. One reason may be that your heart helps you live, by moving ~5 liters (1.3 gallons) of blood through almost 100,000 kilometers (62,000 miles) of blood vessels every single minute! It has to do this all day, everyday, without ever taking a vacation! Now that is true love. Learn about how the heart works, how blood flows through the heart, where the blood goes after it leaves the heart, and what your heart is doing when it makes the sound “Lub Dub.” About Khan Academy: Khan Academy is a nonprofit with a mission to provide a free, world-class education for anyone, anywhere. We believe learners of all ages should have unlimited access to free educational content they can master at their own pace. We use intelligent software, deep data analytics and intuitive user interfaces to help students and teachers around the world. Our resources cover preschool through early college education, including math, biology, chemistry, physics, economics, finance, history, grammar and more. We offer free personalized SAT test prep in partnership with the test developer, the College Board. Khan Academy has been translated into dozens of languages, and 100 million people use our platform worldwide every year. For more information, visit www.khanacademy.org, join us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter at @khanacademy. And remember, you can learn anything. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Health & Medicine channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC1RAowgA3q8Gl7exSWJuDEw?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 1154394 Khan Academy
COPD - Overview and Pathophysiology (PART I)
 
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http://armandoh.org/ https://www.facebook.com/ArmandoHasudungan Support me: http://www.patreon.com/armando Instagram: http://instagram.com/armandohasudungan Twitter: https://twitter.com/Armando71021105 SPECIAL THANKS: Patreon members Artline Australia: http://www.artline.com.au/
Views: 238200 Armando Hasudungan
Severe Asthma. It's not just asthma.
 
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1 in 9 Australians have asthma. Of these, 3 - 10% have severe asthma.
Views: 8707 Asthma Australia
Understanding Asthma: Mild, Moderate, and Severe
 
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To learn more visit www.http://YouAndAsthma.com Asthma is a chronic (long lasting) lung condition that causes coughing, wheezing, and breathing problems. It happens when inflammation and changes in the lungs reduce the flow of oxygen into the blood, making it hard to breathe. Watch this animation to learn about the common causes, symptoms, medicines, as well as the different types of asthma: mild, moderate and severe.
Views: 867 You and Asthma
Watch Asthma : Definition, Clinical Features, Pathogenesis, Treatment (Hd) - Pathogenesis Of Asthma
 
01:02
Best asthma treatment: http://asthmamist1.blogspot.com ...................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................Asthma (Disease Or Medical Condition) Pathology (Medical Specialty) Physiology (Field Of Study) asthma treatment guidelines bronchoconstriction asthma medications chronic conditions medical animations flow volume loop asthma diagnosis asthma symptoms respite health asthma attack asthma cough animation Inspiration lung healh Lymphocyte Expiration breathing wheezing options wheeze health Pathogenesis cough lungs Ig E plan asthma NHS
Views: 1239 Jerry Andrews
Chronic Bronchitis vs Emphysema Pathophysiology, Treatment, Nursing, Symptoms | COPD NCLEX Review
 
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Chronic bronchitis vs emphysema nursing lecture on the pathophysiology, treatment, and symptoms. In this video, I review the similarities between emphysema vs chronic bronchitis and highlight the differences. The biggest differences between chronic bronchitis and emphysema are the pathophysiology and disease specific symptoms. In chronic bronchitis, there is excessive production of mucous and inflammation of the bronchioles. However, in emphysema there is the loss of elasticity of the alveolar sacs. Both conditions lead to respiratory acidosis. However, there is a V/Q mismatch in chronic bronchitis and a matched V/Q defect in emphysema and because of this the body compensates differently. In chronic bronchitis (also called blue bloaters) the patient will have cyanosis and bloating (from hyperinflation and late effects of cor pulmonale). In emphysema (called pink puffers), the patient will have hyperventilation and a barrel chest (no cyanosis due to the hyperventilation). Both conditions are irreversible, caused by inhaling an irritants (mainly smoking), and treated with bronchodilators, corticosteroids, theophylline, or Phosphodiesterase-4 inhibitors. Don't forget to watch the in-depth review on COPD which explains the nursing interventions and side effects of medications. Quiz: http://www.registerednursern.com/chronic-bronchitis-vs-emphysema-quiz/ Lecture Notes: http://www.registerednursern.com/chronic-bronchitis-vs-emphysema-nclex-review-notes/ Subscribe: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=registerednursern Nursing School Supplies: http://www.registerednursern.com/the-ultimate-list-of-nursing-medical-supplies-and-items-a-new-nurse-student-nurse-needs-to-buy/ Nursing Job Search: http://www.registerednursern.com/nursing-career-help/ Visit our website RegisteredNurseRN.com for free quizzes, nursing care plans, salary information, job search, and much more: http://www.registerednursern.com Check out other Videos: https://www.youtube.com/user/RegisteredNurseRN/videos Popular Playlists: NCLEX Reviews: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfWtwCDmLHyX2UeHofCIcgo0 Fluid & Electrolytes: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfWJSZ9pL8L3Q1dzdlxUzeKv Nursing Skills: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfUhd_qQYEbp0Eab3uUKhgKb Nursing School Study Tips: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfWBO40qeDmmaMwMHJEWc9Ms Nursing School Tips & Questions" https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfVQok-t1X5ZMGgQr3IMBY9M Teaching Tutorials: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfUkW_DpJekN_Y0lFkVNFyVF Types of Nursing Specialties: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfW8dRD72gUFa5W7XdfoxArp Healthcare Salary Information: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfVN0vmEP59Tx2bIaB_3Qhdh New Nurse Tips: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfVTqH6LIoAD2zROuzX9GXZy Nursing Career Help: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfVXjptWyvj2sx1k1587B_pj EKG Teaching Tutorials: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfU-A9UTclI0tOYrNJ1N5SNt Personality Types: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfU0qHnOjj2jf4Hw8aJaxbtm Dosage & Calculations for Nurses: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfUYdl0TZQ0Tc2-hLlXlHNXq Diabetes Health Managment: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfXtEx17D7zC1efmWIX-iIs9
Views: 65211 RegisteredNurseRN
Acute Asthmatic Bronchitis
 
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Detailed information on acute bronchitis, including symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment http://annelorita.com
Views: 18371 Anitavarsya
Asthma - CRASH! Medical Review Series
 
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(Disclaimer: The medical information contained herein is intended for physician medical licensing exam review purposes only, and are not intended for diagnosis of any illness. If you think you may be suffering from any medical condition, you should consult your physician or seek immediate medical attention.)
Views: 48313 Paul Bolin, M.D.
STOP BUYING | Worst Foods for Asthma
 
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Please watch: "Only One Glass Kill Diabetes Forever | Tikai viens stikls Kill Diabetes uz visiem laikiem" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UwnsWlvk3LU --~-- Hi Friends, Watch More Top Five Health Care Videos Click here: https://goo.gl/UnZvu8 Today I am Going To Show You , STOP BUYING - If Have Asthma You Must Avoid This What not to eat when you have asthma? What foods are bad for asthma? What not to eat? What should you avoid if you have asthma? Studies show that certain foods can help prevent or minimize common asthma symptoms, such as wheezing, chest tightness and shortness of breath. Likewise, there are foods that make them worst. Here we have listed worse foods for asthma sufferers: Peanuts: One study found children with asthma who also had a peanut allergy seemed to develop asthma earlier than kids without a peanut allergy and were also more likely to be hospitalized and more likely to need steroids. Many asthmatic children with peanut allergies also have allergies to grass, weeds, cats, dust mites and tree pollen, all of which can trigger asthma attacks. Dried Fruit: Many kinds of dried fruit include sulfites, and one of the most problematic additives in foods for many people with asthma. Wine or beer: Many kinds of wine and beer also contain sulfites. You may have to forsake that glass of cabernet if you find yourself coughing or wheezing after indulging. Some research also suggests that histamines in wine can cause symptoms like watery eyes, sneezing and wheezing. Smoking: Cigarette smoke contains different chemicals and gases that can irritate the lungs. Smoking not only increases your chance of getting asthma but also worsens the symptoms such as coughing and wheezing. Also, smoking during pregnancy is known to increase the risk of decreased lung function and wheezing in infants. Follow us On Facebook: https://goo.gl/L2p5KT Twitter: https://goo.gl/LSiwaO Google + : https://goo.gl/R4UnR7 Blogger: https://goo.gl/DN6GtF Wordpress: https://goo.gl/F9yejA Searches related to Worst Foods for Asthma ==================================== food for asthma cure best food for asthma patients good food for asthma patient indian diet for asthma patients fruits for asthma food for asthma child foods that trigger asthma best foods for lungs "asthma medications" "allergic asthma" "bronchial asthma" "natural remedies for asthma" "asthma signs and symptoms" "asthma diet" "asthma attack treatment" "what triggers asthma" "asthma in children" "asthma spacer" "asthma management plan" "signs of asthma attack" "food for asthma" "what is an asthma attack" "severe asthma attack" "home remedies for asthma" "asthma treatment plan" "foods to avoid with asthma" "asthma pump" "what causes asthma attacks" "asthma relief" "allergy and asthma" "how to cure asthma" "skin asthma" "asthma exacerbation" "asthma test" "can asthma be cured" "exercise induced asthma" "asthma cure" "asthma prevention" "asthma control test" "chronic asthma" "mild asthma" "acute asthma attack" "pathophysiology of asthma" "how to treat asthma" "asthma plan" "asthma attack triggers" "asthma treatments" "adult asthma" "best foods for asthma" "asthma remedies" "asthma guidelines" "symptom of asthma" "types of asthma" "is asthma hereditary" "asthma treatment guidelines" "adult onset asthma" "how is asthma caused" "is asthma genetic" "severe asthma" "herbs for asthma" "how to prevent asthma" "asthma management" "natural asthma treatment" "cough variant asthma" "do i have asthma" "etiology of asthma" "asthma diagnosis" "asthma facts" "breathing machine for asthma" "what helps asthma" "mild asthma symptoms" "asthma meds" "what's good for asthma" "how do you get asthma" "food for asthma patient" "signs of asthma in adults" "asthma drugs" "foods good for asthma" "best food for asthma patients" "how to control asthma" "diet for asthma patients" "allergy induced asthma" "foods that trigger asthma" "asthma inhaler brands" "acute asthma" "asthma problems" "allergic asthma symptoms" "asthma description" "asthma machine" "asthma symptoms in children" "asthma food to avoid" "breathing exercises for asthma" "asthma attack causes" "asthma symptoms and treatment" "seasonal asthma" "what is asma" "asthma in toddlers" "cardiac asthma" "asthma inhaler names" "asthma triggers list" "natural cure for asthma" "asthma nebulizer" ================================= Thank you for watching Our videos For more –like-comment-share & subscribe ================================= DISCLAIMER: The information provided on this channel and its videos is for general purposes only and should not be considered as professional advice. We are trying to provide a perfect, valid, specific, detailed information .we are not a licensed professional so make sure with your professional consultant in case you need. All the content published in our channel is our own creativity.
Views: 30414 Orange Health
Asthma Pathogenesis (Rosenwasser)
 
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Dr. Lanny Rosenwasser discusses the pathogenesis of asthma in humans. Held on August 25, 2014.
Views: 502 ACAAICOLA
Asthma- Chronic Treatment & Acute Exacerbations
 
44:38
This video covers the lectures from 01/19/18
Views: 186 PHRM 157
Understanding Asthma - 360p [Animation]
 
01:16
What is exactly Asthma? Asthma is an inflammatory disorder of the airways, which causes attacks of wheezing, shortness of breath, chest tightness, and coughing.Causes, incidence, and risk factors Asthma is caused by inflammation in the airways. When an asthma attack occurs, the muscles surrounding the airways become tight and the lining of the air passages swells. This reduces the amount of air that can pass by. In sensitive people, asthma symptoms can be triggered by breathing in allergy-causing substances (called allergens or triggers). Common asthma triggers include: 1| Animals (pet hair or dander) 2| Dust 3| Changes in weather (most often cold weather) 4| Chemicals in the air or in food 5| Exercise 6| Mold 7| Pollen 8| Respiratory infections, such as the common cold 9| Strong emotions (stress) 10| Tobacco smoke Symptoms Most people with asthma have attacks separated by symptom-free periods. Some people have long-term shortness of breath with episodes of increased shortness of breath. Either wheezing or a cough may be the main symptom.Asthma attacks can last for minutes to days, and can become dangerous if the airflow is severely restricted. Symptoms include: 1| Cough with or without sputum (phlegm) production. 2| Pulling in of the skin between the ribs when breathing (intercostal retractions). 3|Shortness of breath that gets worse with exercise or activity 4|Wheezing, which: Emergency symptoms: Bluish color to the lips and face Decreased level of alertness, such as severe drowsiness or confusion, during an asthma attack Extreme difficulty breathing Rapid pulse Severe anxiety due to shortness of breath Sweating Other symptoms that may occur with this disease: 1| Abnormal breathing pattern --breathing out takes more than twice as long as breathing in. 2| Breathing temporarily stops. 3| Chest pain. 4| Nasal flaring. 5| Tightness in the chest. Go to the emergency room if: 1| You develop drowsiness or confusion. 2| You have severe shortness of breath at rest. 3| Your peak flow measurement is less than 50% of your personal best. 4| You have severe chest pain. Prevention 1| You can reduce asthma symptoms by avoiding known triggers and substances that irritate the airways. 2| Cover bedding with "allergy-proof" casings to reduce exposure to dust mites. 3| Remove carpets from bedrooms and vacuum regularly. 4| Use only unscented detergents and cleaning materials in the home. 5| Keep humidity levels low and fix leaks to reduce the growth of organisms such as mold. 6| Keep the house clean and keep food in containers and out of bedrooms -- this helps reduce the possibility of cockroaches, which can trigger asthma attacks in some people. 7| If a person is allergic to an animal that cannot be removed from the home, the animal should be kept out of the bedroom. Place filtering material over the heating outlets to trap animal dander. 8| Eliminate tobacco smoke from the home. This is the single most important thing a family can do to help a child with asthma. Smoking outside the house is not enough. Family members and visitors who smoke outside carry smoke residue inside on their clothes and hair -- this can trigger asthma symptoms. 9| Persons with asthma should also avoid air pollution, industrial dusts, and other irritating fumes as much as possible. Read More : http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmedhealth/PMH0001196/ Wikipedia source http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Asthma I do not own the video. [NO COPYRIGHT INFRINGEMENT INTENDED!] Please read: the use of any copyrighted material is used under the guidelines of "fair use" in title 17 & 107 of the united states code. such material remains the copyright of the original holder and is used here for the purposes of education, comparison & criticism only. no infringement of copyright is intended. no copyright intended! "fair use" The media material presented in this production is protected by the FAIR USE CLAUSE of the U.S. Copyright Act of 1976, which allows for the rebroadcast of copyrighted materials for the purposes of commentary, criticism, and education. [COPYRIGHT STATEMENT] 'Copyright Disclaimer Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for 'fair use' for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of fair use'
Views: 279638 toms weisiong
Asthma Emergency Room Treatment
 
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This is a video depicting a young boy having initiated an asthma attack while playing in a baseball game and now being treated in the Emergency Room showing typical symptoms displayed and treated. The video shows the correct response by coaches and the emergency crew. As Director of the NPACE Center at Columbus State University, I was responsible for the creation of this video for a Non-Profit client and was the Script Editor, Director, one of the camera operators in a three camera shoot and led the editing of this internet video. (Video by Roger Hart)
Views: 346471 Roger Hart
Asthma Explained Clearly by MedCram.com | 2 of 2
 
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Understand asthma treatment with this clear explanation by Dr. Roger Seheult of http://www.medcram.com. Further discussion on the diagnosis, methacholine challenge test, and stepwise approach for the treatment of asthma (rescue inhaler / beta agonists, corticosteroids, montelukast etc.) MedCram: Medical Topics Explained Clearly by World-Class Instructors RECOMMENDED AUDIENCE: Health care professionals and medical students including physicians, nurse practitioners, physician assistants, nurses, respiratory therapists, EMT and paramedics, and many others. Review for USMLE, MCAT, PANCE, NCLEX, NAPLEX, NDBE, RN, RT, MD, DO, PA, NP school and board examinations. Produced by Kyle Allred PA-C - Please note: MedCram Videos, lectures, illustrations and animations are for educational and exam preparation purposes, and not intended to replace recommendations by your health care provider.
Respiratory Syncytial Virus and Bronchiolitis- causes, symptoms, diagnosis, treatment, pathology
 
07:48
What is Bronchiolitis? Bronchiolitis is inflammation of the small airways, often due to Respiratory Syncytial Virus. It is most dangerous for babies and small children. Find more videos at http://osms.it/more. Hundreds of thousands of current & future clinicians learn by Osmosis. We have unparalleled tools and materials to prepare you to succeed in school, on board exams, and as a future clinician. Sign up for a free trial at http://osms.it/more. Subscribe to our Youtube channel at http://osms.it/subscribe. Get early access to our upcoming video releases, practice questions, giveaways, and more when you follow us on social media: Facebook: http://osms.it/facebook Twitter: http://osms.it/twitter Instagram: http://osms.it/instagram Our Vision: Everyone who cares for someone will learn by Osmosis. Our Mission: To empower the world’s clinicians and caregivers with the best learning experience possible. Learn more here: http://osms.it/mission Medical disclaimer: Knowledge Diffusion Inc (DBA Osmosis) does not provide medical advice. Osmosis and the content available on Osmosis's properties (Osmosis.org, YouTube, and other channels) do not provide a diagnosis or other recommendation for treatment and are not a substitute for the professional judgment of a healthcare professional in diagnosis and treatment of any person or animal. The determination of the need for medical services and the types of healthcare to be provided to a patient are decisions that should be made only by a physician or other licensed health care provider. Always seek the advice of a physician or other qualified healthcare provider with any questions you have regarding a medical condition.
Views: 80961 Osmosis
Breakfast at Glenfield - The Educational Music Video about ACUTE ASTHMA MANAGEMENT
 
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Winner of the British Thoracic Society Innovation in Education Award 2012. Winner of the NHS Expo/ Network Casebook II Innovation Award 2013. As seen on the Department of Health and BBC News Website: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-leicestershire-17945061 @321tapas This video is for educational and entertainment purposes. All music rights owned by Warner Chappell. This video is not officially endorsed by UHL Trust in any way. It was in fact filmed for free on an HTC Sensation mobile phone by a bunch of docs and nurses during their spare time, with no budget or expertise, in an attempt to get you all managing acute asthma properly. We hope you enjoy it.
Views: 92357 Tapas Mukherjee