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Battle of Midway: USN Attacks
 
05:22
A scene from the 2011 film Isoroku Yamamoto: C-in-C of the Combined Fleet, depicting the decisive American naval aviation attack on three of Nagumo's aircraft carriers that were central to the Japanese attack plan: Akagi, Kaga and Soryuu, on the fateful Battle of Midway on the 4th of June 1942. Rengo Kantai Shirei Chokan: Yamamoto Isoroku is a Toei Company film. All rights reserved.
Просмотров: 5827852 Chief Agito
The Battle of Midway: Anatomy of a Decisive World War II Victory | History
 
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Six months after the attack on Pearl Harbor, the United States defeated Japan in one of the most decisive naval battles of World War II. Learn more about the Battle of Midway. #TheWorldWars Subscribe for more HISTORY: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=historychannel Newsletter: https://www.history.com/newsletter Website - http://www.history.com Google+ - https://plus.google.com/+HISTORY/posts Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/History Twitter - https://twitter.com/history HISTORY Topical Video Season 1 Episode 1 Whether you're looking for more on American Revolution battles, WWII generals, architectural wonders, secrets of the ancient world, U.S. presidents, Civil War leaders, famous explorers or the stories behind your favorite holidays, get the best of HISTORY with exclusive videos on our most popular topics. HISTORY®, now reaching more than 98 million homes, is the leading destination for award-winning original series and specials that connect viewers with history in an informative, immersive, and entertaining manner across all platforms. The network’s all-original programming slate features a roster of hit series, epic miniseries, and scripted event programming. Visit us at HISTORY.com for more info.
Просмотров: 546231 HISTORY
Midway: "Battle of Midway Analysis" (1950) US Navy Training Film; World War II in the Pacific
 
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Support this channel: https://www.patreon.com/jeffquitney US Navy Training Film playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLA40407C12E5E35A7 World War II playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL3E5ED4749AE3CD2C John Ford's "The Battle of Midway": https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=89gRI_ROTKQ more at http://quickfound.net/links/military_news_and_links.html Analysis of the movements of American and Japanese naval forces leading up to the Battle of Midway. This is NOT the John Ford film of the battle. US Navy Training Film MN-9168a Originally a public domain film from the US National Archives, slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio corrected, and one-pass brightness-contrast-color correction & mild video noise reduction applied. The soundtrack was also processed with volume normalization, noise reduction, clipping reduction, and/or equalization (the resulting sound, though not perfect, is far less noisy than the original). http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Midway Wikipedia license: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ The Battle of Midway (Japanese: ミッドウェー海戦) is widely regarded as the most important naval battle of the Pacific Campaign of World War II. Between 4 and 7 June 1942, only six months after Japan's attack on Pearl Harbor, and one month after the Battle of the Coral Sea, the United States Navy decisively defeated an Imperial Japanese Navy (IJN) attack against Midway Atoll, inflicting irreparable damage on the Japanese fleet. Military historian John Keegan has called it "the most stunning and decisive blow in the history of naval warfare." The Japanese operation, like the earlier attack on Pearl Harbor, sought to eliminate the United States as a strategic power in the Pacific, thereby giving Japan a free hand in establishing its Greater East Asia Co-Prosperity Sphere. The Japanese hoped that another demoralizing defeat would force the U.S. to capitulate in the Pacific War. The Japanese plan was to lure the United States' aircraft carriers into a trap. The Japanese also intended to occupy Midway Atoll as part of an overall plan to extend their defensive perimeter in response to the Doolittle Raid. This operation was also considered preparatory for further attacks against Fiji and Samoa. The plan was handicapped by faulty Japanese assumptions of the American reaction and poor initial dispositions. Most significantly, American codebreakers were able to determine the date and location of the attack, enabling the forewarned U.S. Navy to set up an ambush of its own. Four Japanese aircraft carriers and a heavy cruiser were sunk for a cost of one American aircraft carrier and a destroyer. After Midway, and the exhausting attrition of the Solomon Islands campaign, Japan's shipbuilding and pilot training programs were unable to keep pace in replacing their losses while the U.S. steadily increased its output in both areas... Yamamoto's plan, Operation Mai Typical of Japanese naval planning during World War II, Yamamoto's battle plan was exceedingly complex. Additionally, his design was predicated on optimistic intelligence suggesting USS Enterprise and USS Hornet, forming Task Force 16, were the only carriers available to the U.S. Pacific Fleet at the time. At the Battle of the Coral Sea just a month earlier, USS Lexington had been sunk and USS Yorktown damaged severely enough that the Japanese believed her also to have been sunk. The Japanese were also aware that USS Saratoga was undergoing repairs on the West Coast after suffering torpedo damage from a submarine. However, more important was Yamamoto's belief the Americans had been demoralized by their frequent defeats during the preceding six months. Yamamoto felt deception would be required to lure the U.S. fleet into a fatally compromised situation. To this end, he dispersed his forces so that their full extent (particularly his battleships) would be unlikely to be discovered by the Americans prior to battle. Critically, Yamamoto's supporting battleships and cruisers would trail Vice-Admiral Nagumo Chūichi's carrier striking force by several hundred miles. Japan's heavy surface forces were intended to destroy whatever part of the U.S. fleet might come to Midway's relief, once Nagumo's carriers had weakened them sufficiently for a daylight gun duel; this was typical of the battle doctrine of most major navies. Yamamoto did not know that the U.S. had broken the main Japanese naval code (dubbed JN-25 by the Americans)...
Просмотров: 144506 Jeff Quitney
Battle of Midway Tactical Overview – World War II | History
 
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Seven months after the attack on Pearl Harbor, American and Japanese forces clashed over Midway Atoll, a dot of land in the middle of the Pacific Ocean. The Battle of Midway tested intelligence and combat capabilities on both sides – while decidedly altering the outcome of World War II. #TheWorldWars Subscribe for more HISTORY: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=historychannel Check out exclusive HISTORY content: Newsletter: https://www.history.com/newsletter Website - http://www.history.com Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/History Twitter - https://twitter.com/history Google+ - https://plus.google.com/+HISTORY HISTORY®, now reaching more than 98 million homes, is the leading destination for award-winning original series and specials that connect viewers with history in an informative, immersive, and entertaining manner across all platforms. The network’s all-original programming slate features a roster of hit series, epic miniseries, and scripted event programming. Visit us at HISTORY.com for more info.
Просмотров: 1130129 HISTORY
The Second World War: The Battle of Midway
 
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By attacking Midway atoll, at the far western end of the Hawaiian chain, the Japanese hoped to lure the US Pacific Fleet into the open sea and destroy it. Instead, due to superb US intelligence and costly Japanese tactical errors, the attack marked the destruction of the Japanese Fleet and the end of Tokyo’s supremacy in the Pacific Ocean. This super film portrays the momentous battle in a day-by-day account.
Просмотров: 370882 Janson Media
The Battle of Midway 1942 US Navy; John Ford; World War II; Technicolor
 
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World War II playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL3E5ED4749AE3CD2C Aircraft Carrier playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLFA956A25F3C04DCF more at http://quickfound.net/links/military_news_and_links.html 'Made in 1942 and shot in color, "The Battle of Midway" is John Ford's masterpiece of documentary filmmaking. Featuring voice overs by Donald Crisp, Henry Fonda, and Jane Darwell, the film includes material shot by Ford himself during the Japanese bombardment of Midway. John Ford's handheld, 16mm footage of the battle was captured totally impromptu. He had been in transit on the island, roused from his bunk by the sounds of the battle, picked up his camera and began shooting. Ford was wounded by shrapnel from a Japanese bomb while filming. Featured in the film are many things of note, including operations of PBY Catalina flying boats as scout aircraft and to recover downed pilots, shots of the B-17s which operated off Midway during the battle, and the assault on Midway itself. At sea, the film shows the American aircraft carrier forces conducting flight operations and defending against Japanese aircraft.' Public domain film from the US National Archives, slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio corrected, and one-pass brightness-contrast-color correction & mild video noise reduction applied. The soundtrack was also processed with volume normalization, noise reduction, clipping reduction, and/or equalization (the resulting sound, though not perfect, is far less noisy than the original). http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Midway The Battle of Midway (Japanese: ミッドウェー海戦) is widely regarded as the most important naval battle of the Pacific Campaign of World War II. Between 4 and 7 June 1942, only six months after Japan's attack on Pearl Harbor, and one month after the Battle of the Coral Sea, the United States Navy decisively defeated an Imperial Japanese Navy (IJN) attack against Midway Atoll, inflicting irreparable damage on the Japanese fleet. Military historian John Keegan has called it "the most stunning and decisive blow in the history of naval warfare." The Japanese operation, like the earlier attack on Pearl Harbor, sought to eliminate the United States as a strategic power in the Pacific, thereby giving Japan a free hand in establishing its Greater East Asia Co-Prosperity Sphere. The Japanese hoped that another demoralizing defeat would force the U.S. to capitulate in the Pacific War. The Japanese plan was to lure the United States' aircraft carriers into a trap. The Japanese also intended to occupy Midway Atoll as part of an overall plan to extend their defensive perimeter in response to the Doolittle Raid. This operation was also considered preparatory for further attacks against Fiji and Samoa. The plan was handicapped by faulty Japanese assumptions of the American reaction and poor initial dispositions. Most significantly, American codebreakers were able to determine the date and location of the attack, enabling the forewarned U.S. Navy to set up an ambush of its own. Four Japanese aircraft carriers and a heavy cruiser were sunk for a cost of one American aircraft carrier and a destroyer. After Midway, and the exhausting attrition of the Solomon Islands campaign, Japan's shipbuilding and pilot training programs were unable to keep pace in replacing their losses while the U.S. steadily increased its output in both areas... Yamamoto's plan, Operation Mai Typical of Japanese naval planning during World War II, Yamamoto's battle plan was exceedingly complex. Additionally, his design was predicated on optimistic intelligence suggesting USS Enterprise and USS Hornet, forming Task Force 16, were the only carriers available to the U.S. Pacific Fleet at the time. At the Battle of the Coral Sea just a month earlier, USS Lexington had been sunk and USS Yorktown damaged severely enough that the Japanese believed her also to have been sunk. The Japanese were also aware that USS Saratoga was undergoing repairs on the West Coast after suffering torpedo damage from a submarine. However, more important was Yamamoto's belief the Americans had been demoralized by their frequent defeats during the preceding six months. Yamamoto felt deception would be required to lure the U.S. fleet into a fatally compromised situation. To this end, he dispersed his forces so that their full extent (particularly his battleships) would be unlikely to be discovered by the Americans prior to battle. Critically, Yamamoto's supporting battleships and cruisers would trail Vice-Admiral Nagumo Chūichi's carrier striking force by several hundred miles... Yamamoto did not know that the U.S. had broken the main Japanese naval code (dubbed JN-25 by the Americans)...
Просмотров: 63713 Jeff Quitney
Midway: Why did the Japanese Lose?
 
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» patreon - https://www.patreon.com/mhv The Battle of Midway (1942) has been by some described as a turning point in the Pacific War. The question is: Why did the Japanese Lose? Or maybe: Why did the Americans win? During my research I came across several different perspectives namely those of Jonathan Parshall and Anthony Tully and those of James Levy. All of them make good points. Yet, what were the key elements? US Intelligence? Japanese Oversights? Victory Disease? A flawed plan? Limited Preparation? The Odds? Failed Recon? After all Operation MI was a complicated plan, but the Japanese clearly had the initiative as well. »» SUPPORT MHV «« » patreon - https://www.patreon.com/mhv » paypal donation - https://www.paypal.com/cgi-bin/webscr?cmd=_s-xclick&hosted_button_id=TFHEY4P4YU3NY » Book Wishlist https://www.amazon.de/gp/registry/wishlist/3LJIXNJIUXJES/ref=cm_wl_huc_view »» MERCHANDISE - SPOILS OF WAR «« » shop - https://www.redbubble.com/people/mhvis/shop »» SOCIAL MEDIA «« » twitter - https://twitter.com/MilHiVisualized » facebook - https://www.facebook.com/milhistoryvisualized/ » twitch - https://www.twitch.tv/militaryhistoryvisualized » tumblr - http://militaryhistoryvisualized.tumblr.com/ » minds.com - https://www.minds.com/militaryhistoryvisualized Military History Visualized provides a series of short narrative and visual presentations like documentaries based on academic literature or sometimes primary sources. Videos are intended as introduction to military history, but also contain a lot of details for history buffs. Since the aim is to keep the episodes short and comprehensive some details are often cut. » SOURCES « Parshall, Jonathan B.; Tully, Anthony P.: Shattered Sword. The Untold Story of the Battle of Midway. Potomac Books: United States, 2007. Amazon.com (affiliate): http://amzn.to/2mqFjhl Amazon.de (affiliate): http://amzn.to/2z2Mgf9 Levy, James P.: Research & Debate. Was there something unique to the Japanese that lost the Battle of Midway? In: Naval War College Review, Winter 2014, Vol. 67, No. 1, p. 119-124 Tully, Anthony; Yu, Lu: A Question of Estimates. How Faulty Intelligence Drove Scouting at the Battle of Midway. In: Naval War College Review, Spring 2015, Vol. 68, No. 2, p. 85-99 Parshall, Jonathan B.: Grading Midway’s Commanders. In: Naval History Magazine – June 2017, Volume 31, Number 3. Evans, David C.; Peattie, Mark R.: Kaigun – Strategy, Tactics, and Technology in the IMPERIAL JAPANESE NAVY 1887-1941. US Naval Institute Press: United States, 2012. Amazon.com (affiliate): https://amzn.to/2J2sQvu Amazon.de (affiliate): https://amzn.to/2GYUdGh Tagaya, Osamu: The Imperial Japanese Air Forces, In: Higham & Harris: Why Air Forces Fail Amazon.com (affiliate link): http://amzn.to/2lcgXFT amazon.de Link (Affiliate): https://amzn.to/2s4OXus Spector, Ronald H.: Eagle against the Sun. The American War with Japan. Cassell & Co: Cornwall, UK, 2000. amazon.com Link (Affiliate): https://amzn.to/2ILKtmM amazon.de Link (Affiliate): https://amzn.to/2J3I06u Lundstrom, John B.: The First Team. Pacific Naval Air Combat from Pearl Harbor to Midway. US Naval Institute Press: United States, 2005. amazon.com Link (Affiliate): https://amzn.to/2GNwmYk amazon.de Link (Affiliate): https://amzn.to/2xeene0 Drea, Edward J.: In Service of the Emperor amazon.com (Affiliate Link): http://amzn.to/2ohD6VU amazon.de Link (Affiliate): http://amzn.to/2BAto6C Giangreco, D. M.: Hell to Pay: Operation Downfall and the Invasion of Japan amazon.com Link (Affiliate): http://amzn.to/2DI0mEa amazon.de Link (Affiliate): http://amzn.to/2DGyuQK » DISCLAIMER « Amazon Associates Program: “Bernhard Kast is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to amazon.com.” Bernhard Kast ist Teilnehmer des Partnerprogramms von Amazon Europe S.à.r.l. und Partner des Werbeprogramms, das zur Bereitstellung eines Mediums für Websites konzipiert wurde, mittels dessen durch die Platzierung von Werbeanzeigen und Links zu amazon.de Werbekostenerstattung verdient werden können. » TOOL CHAIN « PowerPoint 2016, Word, Excel, Tile Mill, QGIS, Processing 3, Adobe Illustrator, Adobe Premiere, Adobe Audition, Adobe Photoshop, Adobe After Effects, Adobe Animate. » DATA CHAIN « Made with Natural Earth. Free vector and raster map data @ naturalearthdata.com. » CREDITS & SPECIAL THX « Song: Ethan Meixsell - Demilitarized Zone
Просмотров: 323927 Military History Visualized
What if Japan Won the Battle of Midway?
 
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Thanks to World of Warships for sponsoring this video! First 300 new users to use the code PLAYWARSHIPS2018 can get 250 doubloons, 1,000,000 Credits, HMS Campbeltown premium ship, one port slot and 3 days premium time when you click here →http://bit.ly/2BJh0WP In 1942 Japan lost the Battle of Midway and so began their eventual fall by the United States. But what if during WWII Japan didn't lose the Battle and instead pushed on? Music: Stompin Jazz Night 2 Road to Monte Carlo 2- Magnus Ringblom The Charleston 9- Hakan Eriksson
Просмотров: 510579 AlternateHistoryHub
War Thunder "Battle of Midway"
 
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http://www.history.navy.mil/photos/events/wwii-pac/midway/midway.htm "The Battle of Midway, fought over and near the tiny U.S. mid-Pacific base at Midway atoll, represents the strategic high water mark of Japan's Pacific Ocean war." I plan on eventually doing all my videos with a similar compositional style as my last Skyrim videos, so they'd be more short-filmish and less documentary-linear style. Way fun to make! Some render issues caused some shots to be rendered in a little bit lower quality then the rest of the shots, it doesn't affect the overall render, it's hardly noticeable, but still a nag. Also, don't mind the 10 seconds of black at the end...or at least try not to...
Просмотров: 193250 Nassault
Battlestations Midway Attack on (Hawaii) Harbor -Battleship Row-
 
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this is the full mission on BSM the link for this is here https://drive.google.com/file/d/0BwJNIRk4TgcgYnNsVDJkT3I0b3M/view anyway here is some background of the very sad day The attack on Pearl Harbor was a surprise military strike by the Imperial Japanese Navy Air Service against the United States naval base at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii Territory, on the morning of December 7, 1941. The attack, also known as the Battle of Pearl Harbor,[9] led to the United States' entry into World War II. The Japanese military leadership referred to the attack as the Hawaii Operation and Operation AI,[10][11] and as Operation Z during its planning.[12] Japan intended the attack as a preventive action to keep the U.S. Pacific Fleet from interfering with military actions they planned in Southeast Asia against overseas territories of the United Kingdom, the Netherlands, and the United States. Over the next seven hours there were coordinated Japanese attacks on the U.S.-held Philippines, Guam and Wake Island and on the British Empire in Malaya, Singapore, and Hong Kong.[13] The attack commenced at 7:48 a.m. Hawaiian Time (18:18 UTC).[14] The base was attacked by 353[15] Imperial Japanese aircraft (including fighters, level and dive bombers, and torpedo bombers) in two waves, launched from six aircraft carriers.[15] All eight U.S. Navy battleships were damaged, with four sunk. All but the USS Arizona were later raised, and six were returned to service and went on to fight in the war. The Japanese also sank or damaged three cruisers, three destroyers, an anti-aircraft training ship,[nb 4] and one minelayer. 188 U.S. aircraft were destroyed; 2,403 Americans were killed and 1,178 others were wounded.[17] Important base installations such as the power station, dry dock, shipyard, maintenance, and fuel and torpedo storage facilities, as well as the submarine piers and headquarters building (also home of the intelligence section), were not attacked. Japanese losses were light: 29 aircraft and five midget submarines lost, and 64 servicemen killed. One Japanese sailor, Kazuo Sakamaki, was captured. The surprise attack came as a profound shock to the American people and led directly to the American entry into World War II in both the Pacific and European theaters. The following day, December 8, the United States declared war on Japan,[18][19] and several days later, on December 11, Germany and Italy declared war on the U.S. The U.S. responded with a declaration of war against Germany and Italy. Domestic support for non-interventionism, which had been fading since the Fall of France in 1940,[20] disappeared.[19] There were numerous historical precedents for unannounced military action by Japan, but the lack of any formal warning, particularly while negotiations were still apparently ongoing, led President Franklin D. Roosevelt to proclaim December 7, 1941, "a date which will live in infamy". Because the attack happened without a declaration of war and without explicit warning, the attack on Pearl Harbor was later judged in the Tokyo Trials to be a war crime.[21][22] hope you all enjoy the video
Просмотров: 3635 Epiic SoNiickzZ
Japanese attack on the U.S. Navy base at Pearl Harbor
 
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Musics: 1. Biocode - Jonathan Mayer (Album: The Battle For Elysium) 2. Darkness On The Edge of Power - Immediate Music (Album: Trailerhead Saga)
Просмотров: 7054054 Eneas Viking
Imperial Japan's INSANE Plans for World Domination. WWII Alternate History
 
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Imperial Japan certainly had some insane plans for world domination during World War II. Today, we're going to be looking at some of the possible alternate history scenarios that could've occurred had Japan been completely unstoppable during and after the war. I've always thought this scenario to be quite an interesting and unexplored topic, especially considering that in the topic of WWII, normally only a German victory is ever seriously explored, with the topic of a Japanese victory often being pushed to the sidelines. Be sure to let me know your thoughts on this scenario as well as the modern Japanese and Asian people in general. Thanks for watching! Footage of Tokyo streets: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BZHKdqMvBWs Toy Soldiers Gameplay WWI Music:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g3qBCJXikSI&list=PLX0jSFrWx1v0U0dH2QI_DNAXnqFR6b5_W&index=3 Footage of WWII: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wOaZalssC0A
Просмотров: 473389 Masaman
Midway: Yamamoto vs Nimitz | Clash of Warriors (6 of 17)
 
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Battle of Midway, (June 3–6, 1942), World War II naval battle, fought almost entirely with aircraft, in which the United States destroyed Japan’s first-line carrier strength and most of its best trained naval pilots. Together with the Battle of Guadalcanal, the Battle of Midway ended the threat of further Japanese invasion in the Pacific. Despite a setback in May 1942 in the indecisive Battle of the Coral Sea, the Japanese had continued with plans to seize Midway Island and bases in the Aleutians. Seeking a naval showdown with the numerically inferior U.S. Pacific Fleet, Adm. Yamamoto Isoroku sent out the bulk of the Japanese fleet, including four heavy and three light aircraft carriers, with orders to engage and destroy the American fleet and invade Midway. U.S. intelligence had divined Japanese intentions after breaking the Japanese naval code, however, and the Americans were ready: three heavy aircraft carriers of the U.S. Pacific Fleet were mustered. These ships were stationed 350 miles northeast of Midway and awaited the advance of Yamamoto’s armada. Whereas the Japanese had no land-based air support, the Americans from Midway and from Hawaii could commit about 115 land-based planes. The battle began on June 3, 1942, when U.S. bombers from Midway Island struck ineffectually at the Japanese invasion force about 220 miles southwest of the U.S. fleet. Early the next morning Japanese planes from the strike force attacked and bombed Midway heavily, while the Japanese carriers escaped damage from U.S. land-based planes. As the morning progressed, the Japanese carriers were soon overwhelmed by the logistics of almost simultaneously sending a second wave of bombers to finish off the Midway runways, zigzagging to avoid the bombs of attacking U.S. aircraft, and trying to launch more planes to sink the now-sighted U.S. naval forces. A wave of U.S. torpedo bombers was almost completely destroyed during their attack on the Japanese carriers at 9:20 AM, but at about 10:30 AM 36 carrier-launched U.S. dive-bombers caught the Japanese carriers while their decks were cluttered with armed aircraft and fuel. The U.S. planes quickly sank three of the heavy Japanese carriers and one heavy cruiser. In the late afternoon U.S. planes disabled the fourth heavy carrier (scuttled the next morning), but its aircraft had badly damaged the U.S. carrier Yorktown. On June 6 a Japanese submarine fatally torpedoed the Yorktown and an escorting American destroyer; that day a Japanese heavy cruiser was sunk. The Japanese, however, appalled by the loss of their carriers, had already begun a general retirement on the night of June 4–5 without attempting to land on Midway. https://www.britannica.com/event/Battle-of-Midway
Просмотров: 909 PANGEA
WAR STRATEGY: Real Life WW2 Battle Tactics of Midway - Axis vs. Allies
 
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WAR STRATEGY: Real Life WW2 Battle Tactics of Midway 🌟SPECIAL OFFERS: ► Free 30 day Audible Trial & Get 2 Free Audiobooks: https://amzn.to/2Iu08SE ...OR: 🌟 try Audiobooks.com 🎧for FREE! : http://affiliates.audiobooks.com/tracking/scripts/click.php?a_aid=5b8c26085f4b8 Formerly CLASSIFIED US Documentary of the ACTUAL Strategies & Tactics of both the Japanese & American Naval Commanders in the Pacific Air & Naval Battle of Midway! LEARN THE BEST TACTICS for your gameplay! Gaming Strategy and Tactics for - Risk Risk: Godswar Risk: 2210 A.D. Close Combat (1996) Close Combat: A Bridge Too Far (1997) Close Combat III: The Russian Front (1998) Close Combat IV: Battle of the Bulge (1999) Close Combat V: Invasion Normandy (2000) Close Combat VI: Cross Of Iron (2007) Close Combat VII: Close Assault(TBA) The Sudden Strike series Sudden Strike (2000) Sudden Strike Forever (2001) (expansion pack) Sudden Strike 2 (2002) Sudden Strike: Resource War (2004) (expansion pack) The Commandos series Commandos: Behind Enemy Lines (1998) Commandos: Beyond the Call of Duty (1999) (expansion pack) Commandos 2: Men of Courage (2001) Commandos 3: Destination Berlin (2003) Commandos: Strike Force (2006) The Blitzkrieg series Blitzkrieg (2003) Blitzkrieg: Burning Horizon (expansion pack) (2004) Blitzkrieg: Rolling Thunder (expansion pack) (2004) Blitzkrieg 2 (2005) Blitzkrieg 2 Liberation The Company of Heroes series Company of Heroes (2006) Company of Heroes: Opposing Fronts (2007) Company of Heroes: Tales of Valor (2009) Other Conqueror (1988) World War II: Frontline Command (2003) Desert Rats vs. Afrika Korps (2004) Axis & Allies (2004) Stalingrad (2005) War Front: Turning Point (2007) Pacific Storm (2006) Mockba to Berlin (2006) Spring: 1944 (2008) World War II Online: Battleground Europe (High Command) (2009) War Leaders: Clash of Nations (2009) R.U.S.E. (2010) ALSO: Battlestations: Midway (2007) Battlestations: Pacific (2009) Allied General (1995) Panzer General (1994) Daisenryaku (Iron Storm) (1996) Operation Europe: Path To Victory (1994) Uncommon Valor (2002) Pacific War: Matrix Edition (2003) Silent Storm (2004) War in the Pacific: The Struggle Against Japan 1941-1945 (2004) War Plan Orange: Dreadnoughts in the Pacific 1922-1930 (2005) World War II - Road to Victory (2008) Combat Mission: Beyond Overlord (2001) Combat Mission: Barbarossa to Berlin (2002) Combat Mission Afrika Korps (2004) Gary Grisby's World at War (2005) Military History Commander Europe at War (2009) War in the Pacific: Admiral's Edition (2009) Sgt. Saunders' Combat! (1995) Operation Europe: Path to Victory (1995) Barbarossa (video game) (1992) Making History (series) Legends of War (2011) Soldiers of Empires (2002) Soldiers of Empires 2 (2012) Strategic Command: European Theater (2002) Steel Panthers (series) (1995-2006) BATTLE OF MIDWAY (1942) http://archive.org/details/gov.archives.arc.13196 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/publicdomain/ This film was produced by the U.S. Government and is in the public domain. National Archives and Records Administration BATTLE OF MIDWAY Department of the Navy. Office of the Chief of Naval Operations. Naval Observatory. (1942 - 09/18/1947) ARC Identifier 13196 / Local Identifier 80-MN-9168D. ww2 world war two ii II 2 battle of midway general pacific fleet japan japanese american us navy naval tactics ocean boat battleship cruiser tokyo los angeles destroyer fighter aircraft carrier dutch harbor alaska hawaii north axis vs allies allied tactics tactical maneuver maneuvers strategy strategies islands tips risk surprise threat attack pearl harbor The Battle of Midway Category: Entertainment Tags: US Miltary Secrets WWII Crazy War Stories Heroes History Hardware Military Documentary Hitler chamberlain churchill allied powers doolittle japan china eisenhower hirohito adolf fuhrer germany nazi concentration camps braun pearl harbor mussolini fascist paulus rommel afrika Korps Roosevelt Stalin Truman atomic bombs Britain France United States Soviet Union Axis Okinawa Stalingrad Manhattan Project Hiroshima Nagasaki S.S. war stories Battle of Midway dutch osama bin laden
Просмотров: 178669 Bright Enlightenment
Battlefield - The Battle of Midway
 
01:54:49
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Midway The Battle of Midway was a decisive naval battle in the Pacific Theater of World War II which occurred between 4 and 7 June 1942, only six months after Japan's attack on Pearl Harbor and one month after the Battle of the Coral Sea.[6][7][8] The United States Navy under Admirals Chester Nimitz, Frank Jack Fletcher, and Raymond A. Spruance defeated an attacking fleet of the Imperial Japanese Navy under Admirals Isoroku Yamamoto, Chūichi Nagumo, and Nobutake Kondō near Midway Atoll, inflicting devastating damage on the Japanese fleet that proved irreparable. Military historian John Keegan called it "the most stunning and decisive blow in the history of naval warfare".[9] The Japanese operation, like the earlier attack on Pearl Harbor, sought to eliminate the United States as a strategic power in the Pacific, thereby giving Japan a free hand in establishing its Greater East Asia Co-Prosperity Sphere. The Japanese hoped another demoralizing defeat would force the U.S. to capitulate in the Pacific War and thus ensure Japanese dominance in the Pacific. Luring the American aircraft carriers into a trap and occupying Midway was part of an overall "barrier" strategy to extend Japan's defensive perimeter, in response to the Doolittle air raid on Tokyo. This operation was also considered preparatory for further attacks against Fiji, Samoa, and Hawaii itself. The plan was handicapped by faulty Japanese assumptions of the American reaction and poor initial dispositions. Most significantly, American cryptographers were able to determine the date and location of the planned attack, enabling the forewarned U.S. Navy to prepare its own ambush. Four Japanese and three American aircraft carriers participated in the battle. All four of Japan's large fleet carriers—Akagi, Kaga, Sōryū and Hiryū, part of the six-carrier force that had attacked Pearl Harbor six months earlier—and a heavy cruiser were sunk, while the U.S. lost only the carrier Yorktown and a destroyer. After Midway and the exhausting attrition of the Solomon Islands campaign, Japan's capacity to replace its losses in materiel (particularly aircraft carriers) and men (especially well-trained pilots and maintenance crewmen) rapidly became insufficient to cope with mounting casualties, while the United States' massive industrial and training capabilities made losses far easier to replace. The Battle of Midway, along with the Guadalcanal Campaign, is widely considered a turning point in the Pacific War.
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What if the Japanese won the Battle of Midway?
 
06:16
The deadliest war in History would hold out a bit longer, but don't expect too much of a change. Find out why in this video.
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Japanese Air Attack on US Navy Aircraft Carrier Task Force Off Saipan Combat Action Footage WW2
 
04:35
World War II U.S. naval action video with sound from the Mariana Islands campaign. Battle footage as Japanese airplanes attack US Navy warships off Saipan during the Mariana Islands offensive. Thanks for watching and please like, comment, share and Subscribe! Also please feel free to use YouTube's embed feature to put any of my videos on forums or your website. Follow on Twitter at: https://twitter.com/HistoryFlicks4U
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Battle of Midway (1942) - War footage
 
06:07
Producer: National Archives and Records Administration Language: English Creative Commons license: CC0 1.0 Universal National Archives and Records Administration - ARC Identifier 65422 / Local Identifier 342-USAF-16985 - Battle of Midway - Department of Defense. Department of the Air Force. (09/26/1947 - ). Summary: World War II battle at Midway in 1942 betwwen Japanese and US Navy ships and planes. Scenes show also Japanese ships and planes and the action Midway Island took against enemy air raids. Aircraft in picture are B-17s and Navy PBY-5s. 1) Animation of the Pacific Ocean showings the location on Midway Island. 2) AS of the Navy patrol plane in flight, interior and exterior shots showing the crew in their various positions. 3) PS taken from a ship showing Midway Island 4) CS Various types of Naval vessels at anchor. 5) Aircraft symbol, Navy PBY-5A. 6) GS our Navy PBY-5A taxiing in water. 7) Good, shot of crew in swimming suits taking gear down and attaching it to underside of planes in water. 8) Hauling the plane. 9) Good shots of the colors going by -- Marines on parade, walking up along the shore. 10) CS of the birds on the island shows them walking around on the sand. 11) PS of a ship at sea, crews in alert position. 12) PS of the crews watching the sky. 13) CS of a B-17 on Midway Island, stationary crew operating to enter plane. 14) PS of various B-17s preparing to take off on mission. 15) CS of ground personnel servicing B-17, fueling, loading in bomb bays. 16) CS crews of B-17. 17) CS railroad engineer oiling parts of the engine. 18) CS of a mother at home with a star in the window. 19) CS B-17 taxiing, two engines feathered. 20) PS L to R of Midway Island showing B-17 taking off. 21) CS ground observer looking towards sky at Japanese bomber coming in. 22) CS machine gun and ack-ack fire shooting at Japanese attack planes. 23) Good coverage of fighters taking off from base on Midway. 24) Very good coverage of the Battle of Midway showing the gunners close up, gunners firing. 25) CS of Japanese bombers coming in low over the island and dropping their bombs. 26) Excellent shots of explosions of the bombs. 27) PS harbor and hangar area show hangar burning. 28) PS along the shore showing the supply area afire. 29) PS of the Air Corps personnel on flying field -- B-17s burning. 30) CS of the US flag being raised upon the mast. 31) Good shot of the flag on mast, in bg clouds of thick black smoke going up. 32) PS of harbor area showing the buildings and hangars afire. 33) CS plane afire coming in for a crash landing. 34) CS jeep driving through the debris near burning buildings. 35) CS Medics giving first aid treatment to wounded in the battle. 36) MLS hangar building afire showing huge column of flame and smoke rising. 37) GS showing a Japanese Zero dive bomber coming in and crashing into hangar area. 38) A. formation of Navy fighters. 39) ADS battle fleet at sea -- aircraft carriers, destroyers and destroyer escorts. 40) AS of fleet underway at sea. 41) CS taken on deck of an aircraft carrier, showing the torpedo bombers and fighters taking off. 42) CS of ack-ack gun positions firing at the attacking Japanese. 43) PSs across the sea and air battle showing the ships' guns firing at the attacking Japanese Aircraft. Good coverage of the battle. 44) CS of guns firing at attacking Japanese aircraft. 45) LS Japanese fighter-bombers come in low across ship's deck. 46) CS of pilot of Navy plane. 47) Several shots of the pilots getting out off their planes aboard aircraft carrier. 48) PS of Midway Island showing damage done by air raid -- Hang. 49) CS of several Japanese planes that had crashed. 50) AS of OA-10 or Navy PBY-5 in flight. 51) Good coverage of Air Sea Rescue program. 52) CS of Air-Sea Rescue bringing in rescued pilots who have been picked up at sea. 53) CS of pilots being removed from Navy plans at rescue station. 54) PS of the remains of the hospital which was burned out during the battle. 55) PS coverage of the burial ceremonies held on Midway, soldiers and sailors at the ceremonies. 56) PSs of the flag draped caskets. 57) MLS firing squad. 58) CS of the troops saluting. 59) MLS small ships, with flag draped caskets on deck going out to sea.
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20th Century Battlefields - 1942 Battle of Midway HD
 
56:12
The Battle of Midway was a decisive naval battle in the Pacific Theater of World War II. Between 4 and 7 June 1942, only six months after Japan's attack on Pearl Harbor and one month after the Battle of the Coral Sea, the United States Navy under Admirals Chester Nimitz, Frank Jack Fletcher, and Raymond A. Spruance decisively defeated an attacking fleet of the Imperial Japanese Navy under Admirals Isoroku Yamamoto, Chuichi Nagumo, and Nobutake Kondo near Midway Atoll, inflicting devastating damage on the Japanese fleet that proved irreparable. Military historian John Keegan called it "the most stunning and decisive blow in the history of naval warfare." The Japanese operation, like the earlier attack on Pearl Harbor, sought to eliminate the United States as a strategic power in the Pacific, thereby giving Japan a free hand in establishing its Greater East Asia Co-Prosperity Sphere. The Japanese hoped another demoralizing defeat would force the U.S. to capitulate in the Pacific War and thus ensure Japanese dominance in the Pacific. Luring the American aircraft carriers into a trap and occupying Midway was part of an overall "barrier" strategy to extend Japan's defensive perimeter, in response to the Doolittle air raid on Tokyo. This operation was also considered preparatory for further attacks against Fiji, Samoa, and Hawaii itself. The plan was handicapped by faulty Japanese assumptions of the American reaction and poor initial dispositions. Most significantly, American cryptographers were able to determine the date and location of the planned attack, enabling the forewarned U.S. Navy to prepare its own ambush. All four of Japan's large aircraft carriers—Akagi, Kaga, Soryu and Hiryu, part of the six-carrier force that had attacked Pearl Harbor six months earlier—and a heavy cruiser were sunk, while the U.S. lost only the carrier Yorktown and a destroyer. After Midway and the exhausting attrition of the Solomon Islands campaign, Japan's capacity to replace its losses in materiel (particularly aircraft carriers) and men (especially well-trained pilots and maintenance crewmen) rapidly became insufficient to cope with mounting casualties, while the United States' massive industrial and training capabilities made losses far easier to replace. The Battle of Midway, along with the Guadalcanal Campaign, is widely considered a turning point in the Pacific War.
Просмотров: 29108 Red Baron
Battle of Midway
 
05:11
June 1942: Believing the U.S. Pacific Fleet is on the verge of collapse, the Japanese hope another defeat will force the U.S. to quit the war. The Japanese plan to invade the small, strategic outpost of Midway Island, which, if taken, will allow them to threaten Hawaii directly. U.S. Navy cryptographers cracked the Japanese code, and Admiral Chester Nimitz knows their attack plan. In preparation, the U.S. Navy plans to ambush Japanese forces. The battle that follows is considered by many historians to be the most decisive engagement in modern naval warfare. (Video by Petty Officer 1st Class Daniel Garas)
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5 WAYS JAPAN MIGHT HAVE WON WORLD WAR 2 || WARTHOG 2018
 
07:37
This video is made under Fair use policy Let's face it. Imperial Japan stood next to no chance of winning a fight to the finish against the United States. Resolve and resources explain why. So long as Americans kept their dander up, demanding that their leaders press on to complete victory, Washington had a mandate to convert the republic's immense industrial potential into a virtually unstoppable armada of ships, aircraft, and armaments. Such a physical mismatch was simply too much for island state Japan -- with an economy about one-tenth the size of America's -- to surmount. By James Holmes, The National Interest https://www.themaven.net/warriormaven/history/5-ways-japan-might-have-won-world-war-ii-CB4phm_Jd0SKTynkTRbOpg Warthog Defense members are sharing stories, insider tips, news from the front lines, and unique slices of military life including the tough stuff of war. Warthog Defense provides headline news and technology updates since our community answers the call and makes news. We also cover the rest of the military experience —and in our military equipment guide we present what makes the military unique (and fun). We also wan't to revolutionize the way for Americans with military affinity stay connected and informed. The United States Air Force will be a trusted and reliable joint partner with our sister services known for integrity in all of our activities, including supporting the joint mission first and foremost. We will provide compelling air, space, and cyber capabilities for use by the combatant commanders. We will excel as stewards of all Air Force resources in service to the American people, while providing precise and reliable Global Vigilance, Reach and Power for the nation. The U.S. Army’s mission is to fight and win our Nation’s wars by providing prompt, sustained land dominance across the full range of military operations and spectrum of conflict in support of combatant commanders. We do this by: Executing Title 10 and Title 32 United States Code directives, to include organizing, equipping, and training forces for the conduct of prompt and sustained combat operations on land. Accomplishing missions assigned by the President, Secretary of Defense and combatant commanders, and Transforming for the future.
Просмотров: 8379 Warthog Defense
Attack on Pearl Harbor 1941
 
17:58
(Animated Battle Map) I do not own the rights to the songs or images. This video is purely for educational purposes. Credit- No copyright intended, all Image rights go to: -Wikipedia Commons https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Ba... -Naval History Heritage and Command https://www.history.navy.mil/ Images contained on this site that are donated from private sources are © copyrighted by the respective owner. Images credited to the National Archives (NA, NARA); Naval History & Heritage Command (NHHC), formerly Naval Historical Center (NHC); and U.S. Navy (USN) are believed to be in the public domain. Some images credited to the United States Naval Institute (USNI) are from © copyrighted collections, the rest are believed to be in the public domain. No copyright intended, all MUSIC rights go to: NCM Epic Music Ender Guney https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCHEioEoqyFPsOiW8CepDaYg Sources: Kinzey, B., & Roszak, R. (2010). Attack on Pearl Harbor: Japan awakens a sleeping giant. Blacksburg, VA: MAA. Stille, M. (2011). Tora! Tora! Tora!: Pearl Harbor 1941. Oxford: Osprey. Zimm, A. D. (2013). The attack on Pearl Harbour: strategy, combat, myths, deceptions. Havertown, PA: Casemate. Websites: Naval History and Heritage Command. https://www.history.navy.mil/ Visit Pearl harbor. https://visitpearlharbor.org/
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Pearl Harbor – The Japanese Attack #Pacific
 
10:21
» HOW YOU CAN SUPPORT MILITARY HISTORY VISUALIZED « (A) You can support my channel on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/mhv (B) Alternatively, you can also buy "Spoils of War" (merchandise) in my online shop: https://www.redbubble.com/people/mhvis/shop (C) If you want to buy books that I use or recommend, here is the link to the Amazon Store: http://astore.amazon.com/ytmh-20 which has the same price for you and gives a small commission to me, thus it is a win/win. » SOCIAL MEDIA LINKS « facebook: https://www.facebook.com/milhistoryvisualized/ twitter: https://twitter.com/MilHiVisualized tumblr: http://militaryhistoryvisualized.tumblr.com/ » SOURCES & LINKS « Kuehn, John T.: The war in the Pacific, 1941-1945; in: Cambridge History of the Second World War, Volume 1 Amazon.com (affiliate): http://amzn.to/2g82o9a Dull, Paul S.: The Battle History of the Imperial Japanese Navy. Amazon.com (affiliate): http://amzn.to/2gPBxhJ Germany & The Second World War – Volume VI Amazon.com (affiliate): http://amzn.to/2g85hqt Das Deutsche Reich und der Zweite Weltkrieg, Band 6. Amazon.de (affiliate) http://amzn.to/2gc49Ra Zimm, Alan D. The Pearl Harbor Myth http://www.historynet.com/pearl-harbor Zimm, Alan D. Attack on Pearl Harbor: Strategy, Combat, Myths, Deceptions. Amazon.com (affiliate): http://amzn.to/2gc0LWk » ADDITIONAL LINKS « Maps http://pacificwarbirds.com/pearl-harbor-map-world-war-ii/ https://spotlights.fold3.com/2011/12/07/pearl-harbor/ Verifying the Submarine loss https://www.history.navy.mil/research/library/online-reading-room/title-list-alphabetically/u/united-states-submarine-losses/japanese-submarine-casualties-in-world-war-two-i-and-ro-boats.html http://www.combinedfleet.com/I-70.htm Bonus Link (not used): Original Damage Reports https://archive.org/download/WorldWarIIPearlHarborDamageReports » CREDITS & SPECIAL THX « Song: Ethan Meixsell - Demilitarized Zone » DISCLAIMER « Amazon Associates Program: “Bernhard Kast is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to amazon.com.” Bernhard Kast ist Teilnehmer des Partnerprogramms von Amazon Europe S.à.r.l. und Partner des Werbeprogramms, das zur Bereitstellung eines Mediums für Websites konzipiert wurde, mittels dessen durch die Platzierung von Werbeanzeigen und Links zu amazon.de Werbekostenerstattung verdient werden können.
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BATTLE OF THE CORAL SEA & BATTLE OF MIDWAY NEWSREEL WWII 27892
 
09:49
This Castle Films newsreel dates to 1942 and shows the dramatic developments in the war in the Pacific, where the U.S. Navy repelled a Japanese invasion fleet at the Battle of the Coral Sea and then decisively crushed the Japanese fleet at Midway. The film begins with footage of American troops on the move across the Pacific to Australia, where General Douglas MacArthur plans America's next move. Bombers are shown flying out of Port Moresby to harass the Japanese, and a crippled bomber lands with no gear. The city of Darwin, attacked by Japanese aircraft, is shown on defensive posture with camouflaged weapons in place. The Battle of the Coral Sea, fought during 4–8 May 1942, was a major naval battle in the Pacific Theater of World War II between the Imperial Japanese Navy and naval and air forces from the United States and Australia. The battle was the first action in which aircraft carriers engaged each other, as well as the first in which neither side's ships sighted or fired directly upon the other. In an attempt to strengthen their defensive positioning for their empire in the South Pacific, Japanese forces decided to invade and occupy Port Moresby in New Guinea and Tulagi in the southeastern Solomon Islands. The US learned of the Japanese plan through signals intelligence and sent two United States Navy carrier task forces and a joint Australian-American cruiser force, under the overall command of American Admiral Frank J. Fletcher, to oppose the Japanese offensive. On 3–4 May, Japanese forces successfully invaded and occupied Tulagi, although several of their supporting warships were surprised and sunk or damaged by aircraft from the US fleet carrier Yorktown. Now aware of the presence of US carriers in the area, the Japanese fleet carriers advanced towards the Coral Sea with the intention of finding and destroying the Allied naval forces. Beginning on 7 May, the carrier forces from the two sides exchanged airstrikes over two consecutive days. The first day, the US sank the Japanese light carrier Shōhō, while the Japanese sank a US destroyer and heavily damaged a fleet oiler (which was later scuttled). The next day, the Japanese fleet carrier Shōkaku was heavily damaged, the US fleet carrier Lexington was critically damaged (and was scuttled as a result), and the Yorktown was damaged. With both sides having suffered heavy losses in aircraft and carriers damaged or sunk, the two fleets disengaged and retired from the battle area. Because of the loss of carrier air cover, Inoue recalled the Port Moresby invasion fleet, intending to try again later. Although a tactical victory for the Japanese in terms of ships sunk, the battle would prove to be a strategic victory for the Allies for several reasons. The Battle of Midway was a crucial and decisive naval battle in the Pacific Theatre of World War II. Between 4 and 7 June 1942, only six months after Japan's attack on Pearl Harbor and one month after the Battle of the Coral Sea, the United States Navy under Admirals Chester Nimitz, Frank Jack Fletcher, and Raymond A. Spruance decisively defeated an attacking fleet of the Imperial Japanese Navy under Admirals Isoroku Yamamoto, Chuichi Nagumo, and Nobutake Kondo near Midway Atoll, inflicting devastating damage on the Japanese fleet that proved irreparable.[9] Military historian John Keegan called it "the most stunning and decisive blow in the history of naval warfare." It was Japan's first naval defeat since the Battle of Shimonoseki Straits in 1863. The Japanese operation, like the earlier attack on Pearl Harbor, sought to eliminate the United States as a strategic power in the Pacific, thereby giving Japan a free hand in establishing its Greater East Asia Co-Prosperity Sphere. The Japanese hoped that another demoralizing defeat would force the U.S. to capitulate in the Pacific War and thus ensure Japanese dominance in the Pacific.The Battle of Midway, in combination with the Soviet victory against Germany at the Battle of Stalingrad some months later, are considered by some to be the turning points of the Second World War in favor of Allied victory. We encourage viewers to add comments and, especially, to provide additional information about our videos by adding a comment! See something interesting? Tell people what it is and what they can see by writing something for example like: "01:00:12:00 -- President Roosevelt is seen meeting with Winston Churchill at the Quebec Conference." This film is part of the Periscope Film LLC archive, one of the largest historic military, transportation, and aviation stock footage collections in the USA. Entirely film backed, this material is available for licensing in 24p HD and 2k. For more information visit http://www.PeriscopeFilm.com
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(9/12) Battlefield I: The Battle of Midway Episode 4 (GDH)
 
10:00
SUBSCRIBE TO EXCELLENT WORLD WAR II VIDEOS UPDATED WEEKLY Just after midnight on 4 June, Admiral Nimitz, based on patrol plane reports, advised Task Forces 16 and 17 of the course and speed of the Japanese "main body," also noting their distance of 574 miles from Midway. Shortly after dawn, a patrol plane spotted two Japanese carriers and their escorts, reporting "Many planes heading Midway from 320 degrees distant 150 miles!" The first attack on 4 June, however, took place when the four night-flying PBYs attacked the Japanese transports northwest of Midway with one PBY torpedoing fleet tanker Akebono Maru. Later that morning, at roughly 0630, Aichi D3A ("Val") carrier bombers and Nakajima B5N ("Kate") torpedo planes, supported by numerous fighters ("Zekes"), bombed Midway Island installations. Although defending U.S. Marine Corps Brewster F2A ("Buffalo") and Grumman F4F ("Wildcat") fighters suffered disastrous losses, losing 17 of 26 aloft, the Japanese only inflicted slight damage to the facilities on Midway. Motor Torpedo Boat PT-25 was also damaged by strafing in Midway lagoon. Over the next two hours, Japanese "Zekes" on Combat Air Patrol (CAP) and antiaircraft fire from the Japanese fleet annihilated the repeated attacks by the American aircraft from Marine Corps Douglas SBD ("Dauntless") and Vought SB2U ("Vindicator") scout bombers from VMSB-241, Navy Grumman TBF ("Avenger") torpedo bombers from VT-8 detachment, and U. S. Army Air Force torpedo-carrying Martin B-26 ("Marauder") bombers sent out to attack the Japanese carriers. Army Air Force "Flying Fortresses" likewise bombed the Japanese carrier force without success, although without losses to themselves. Between 0930 and 1030, Douglas TBD ("Devastator") torpedo bombers from VT 3, VT-6, and VT-8 on the three American carriers attacked the Japanese carriers. Although nearly wiped out by the defending Japanese fighters and antiaircraft fire, they drew off enemy fighters, leaving the skies open for dive bombers from Enterprise and Yorktown. VB-6 and VS-6 "Dauntlesses" from Enterprise bombed and fatally damaged carriers Kaga and Akagi, while VB-3 "Dauntlesses" from Yorktown bombed and wrecked carrier Soryu. American submarine Nautilus (SS-168) then fired torpedoes at the burning Kaga but her torpedoes did not explode. At 1100, the one Japanese carrier that escaped destruction that morning, Hiryu, launched "Val" dive bombers that temporarily disabled Yorktown around noon. Three and a half hours later, Hiryu's "Kate" torpedo planes struck a second blow, forcing Yorktown's abandonment. In return, "Dauntlesses" from Enterprise mortally damaged Hiryu in a strike around 1700 that afternoon. The destruction of the Carrier Strike Force compelled Admiral Yamamoto to abandon his Midway invasion plans, and the Japanese Fleet began to retire westward. During the battle, Japanese destroyers had picked up three U.S. naval aviators from the water. After interrogation, however, all three Americans were murdered. One TBD pilot, Lieutenant George Gay escaped detection by the Japanese ships and was later rescued by a PBY. On 5 June, TF 16 under command of Rear Admiral Spruance pursued the Japanese fleet westward, while work continued to salvage the damaged Yorktown. Both Akagi and Hiryu, damaged the previous day, were scuttled by Japanese destroyers early on the 5th. The last air attacks of the battle took place on 6 June when dive bombers from Enterprise and Hornet bombed and sank heavy cruiser Mikuma, and damaged destroyers Asashio and Arashio,as well as the cruiser Mogami. At Admiral Spruance's expressed orders, issued because of the destruction of three torpedo squadrons on 4 June, "Devastators" from VT-6 that accompanied the strike did not attack because of the threat to them from surface antiaircraft fire. After recovering these planes, TF 16 turned eastward and broke off contact with the enemy. COMINT intercepts over the following two days documented the withdrawal of Japanese forces toward Saipan and the Home Islands. Meanwhile, on the 6th, Japanese submarine I-168 interrupted the U.S. salvage operations, torpedoing Yorktown and torpedoing and sinking destroyer USS Hammann (DD-412). Screening destroyers depth-charged I-168 but the Japanese submarine escaped destruction. Yorktown, suffering from numerous torpedo hits, finally rolled over and sank at dawn on 7 June. (Excerpt for Naval Historical Center)
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What if Japan invaded the Soviet Union in World War 2?
 
10:04
What if the Germans won world war 2 link https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=262Bn1kXz5Y&list=PLZxP2pdh77oWrWG1y5OD6LeIE4xHNs5uJ&index=3If Japan invaded the Soviet Union in World War 2 the British Empire would still exist and Pearl Harbor would never happen. To find out how watch this video.
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(8/12) Battlefield I: The Battle of Midway Episode 4 (GDH)
 
10:00
SUBSCRIBE TO EXCELLENT WORLD WAR II VIDEOS UPDATED WEEKLY Just after midnight on 4 June, Admiral Nimitz, based on patrol plane reports, advised Task Forces 16 and 17 of the course and speed of the Japanese "main body," also noting their distance of 574 miles from Midway. Shortly after dawn, a patrol plane spotted two Japanese carriers and their escorts, reporting "Many planes heading Midway from 320 degrees distant 150 miles!" The first attack on 4 June, however, took place when the four night-flying PBYs attacked the Japanese transports northwest of Midway with one PBY torpedoing fleet tanker Akebono Maru. Later that morning, at roughly 0630, Aichi D3A ("Val") carrier bombers and Nakajima B5N ("Kate") torpedo planes, supported by numerous fighters ("Zekes"), bombed Midway Island installations. Although defending U.S. Marine Corps Brewster F2A ("Buffalo") and Grumman F4F ("Wildcat") fighters suffered disastrous losses, losing 17 of 26 aloft, the Japanese only inflicted slight damage to the facilities on Midway. Motor Torpedo Boat PT-25 was also damaged by strafing in Midway lagoon. Over the next two hours, Japanese "Zekes" on Combat Air Patrol (CAP) and antiaircraft fire from the Japanese fleet annihilated the repeated attacks by the American aircraft from Marine Corps Douglas SBD ("Dauntless") and Vought SB2U ("Vindicator") scout bombers from VMSB-241, Navy Grumman TBF ("Avenger") torpedo bombers from VT-8 detachment, and U. S. Army Air Force torpedo-carrying Martin B-26 ("Marauder") bombers sent out to attack the Japanese carriers. Army Air Force "Flying Fortresses" likewise bombed the Japanese carrier force without success, although without losses to themselves. Between 0930 and 1030, Douglas TBD ("Devastator") torpedo bombers from VT 3, VT-6, and VT-8 on the three American carriers attacked the Japanese carriers. Although nearly wiped out by the defending Japanese fighters and antiaircraft fire, they drew off enemy fighters, leaving the skies open for dive bombers from Enterprise and Yorktown. VB-6 and VS-6 "Dauntlesses" from Enterprise bombed and fatally damaged carriers Kaga and Akagi, while VB-3 "Dauntlesses" from Yorktown bombed and wrecked carrier Soryu. American submarine Nautilus (SS-168) then fired torpedoes at the burning Kaga but her torpedoes did not explode. At 1100, the one Japanese carrier that escaped destruction that morning, Hiryu, launched "Val" dive bombers that temporarily disabled Yorktown around noon. Three and a half hours later, Hiryu's "Kate" torpedo planes struck a second blow, forcing Yorktown's abandonment. In return, "Dauntlesses" from Enterprise mortally damaged Hiryu in a strike around 1700 that afternoon. The destruction of the Carrier Strike Force compelled Admiral Yamamoto to abandon his Midway invasion plans, and the Japanese Fleet began to retire westward. During the battle, Japanese destroyers had picked up three U.S. naval aviators from the water. After interrogation, however, all three Americans were murdered. One TBD pilot, Lieutenant George Gay escaped detection by the Japanese ships and was later rescued by a PBY. On 5 June, TF 16 under command of Rear Admiral Spruance pursued the Japanese fleet westward, while work continued to salvage the damaged Yorktown. Both Akagi and Hiryu, damaged the previous day, were scuttled by Japanese destroyers early on the 5th. The last air attacks of the battle took place on 6 June when dive bombers from Enterprise and Hornet bombed and sank heavy cruiser Mikuma, and damaged destroyers Asashio and Arashio,as well as the cruiser Mogami. At Admiral Spruance's expressed orders, issued because of the destruction of three torpedo squadrons on 4 June, "Devastators" from VT-6 that accompanied the strike did not attack because of the threat to them from surface antiaircraft fire. After recovering these planes, TF 16 turned eastward and broke off contact with the enemy. COMINT intercepts over the following two days documented the withdrawal of Japanese forces toward Saipan and the Home Islands. Meanwhile, on the 6th, Japanese submarine I-168 interrupted the U.S. salvage operations, torpedoing Yorktown and torpedoing and sinking destroyer USS Hammann (DD-412). Screening destroyers depth-charged I-168 but the Japanese submarine escaped destruction. Yorktown, suffering from numerous torpedo hits, finally rolled over and sank at dawn on 7 June. (Excerpt for Naval Historical Center)
Просмотров: 15296 2bn442RCT
(7/12) Battlefield I: The Battle of Midway Episode 4 (GDH)
 
10:00
SUBSCRIBE TO EXCELLENT WORLD WAR II VIDEOS UPDATED WEEKLY Just after midnight on 4 June, Admiral Nimitz, based on patrol plane reports, advised Task Forces 16 and 17 of the course and speed of the Japanese "main body," also noting their distance of 574 miles from Midway. Shortly after dawn, a patrol plane spotted two Japanese carriers and their escorts, reporting "Many planes heading Midway from 320 degrees distant 150 miles!" The first attack on 4 June, however, took place when the four night-flying PBYs attacked the Japanese transports northwest of Midway with one PBY torpedoing fleet tanker Akebono Maru. Later that morning, at roughly 0630, Aichi D3A ("Val") carrier bombers and Nakajima B5N ("Kate") torpedo planes, supported by numerous fighters ("Zekes"), bombed Midway Island installations. Although defending U.S. Marine Corps Brewster F2A ("Buffalo") and Grumman F4F ("Wildcat") fighters suffered disastrous losses, losing 17 of 26 aloft, the Japanese only inflicted slight damage to the facilities on Midway. Motor Torpedo Boat PT-25 was also damaged by strafing in Midway lagoon. Over the next two hours, Japanese "Zekes" on Combat Air Patrol (CAP) and antiaircraft fire from the Japanese fleet annihilated the repeated attacks by the American aircraft from Marine Corps Douglas SBD ("Dauntless") and Vought SB2U ("Vindicator") scout bombers from VMSB-241, Navy Grumman TBF ("Avenger") torpedo bombers from VT-8 detachment, and U. S. Army Air Force torpedo-carrying Martin B-26 ("Marauder") bombers sent out to attack the Japanese carriers. Army Air Force "Flying Fortresses" likewise bombed the Japanese carrier force without success, although without losses to themselves. Between 0930 and 1030, Douglas TBD ("Devastator") torpedo bombers from VT 3, VT-6, and VT-8 on the three American carriers attacked the Japanese carriers. Although nearly wiped out by the defending Japanese fighters and antiaircraft fire, they drew off enemy fighters, leaving the skies open for dive bombers from Enterprise and Yorktown. VB-6 and VS-6 "Dauntlesses" from Enterprise bombed and fatally damaged carriers Kaga and Akagi, while VB-3 "Dauntlesses" from Yorktown bombed and wrecked carrier Soryu. American submarine Nautilus (SS-168) then fired torpedoes at the burning Kaga but her torpedoes did not explode. At 1100, the one Japanese carrier that escaped destruction that morning, Hiryu, launched "Val" dive bombers that temporarily disabled Yorktown around noon. Three and a half hours later, Hiryu's "Kate" torpedo planes struck a second blow, forcing Yorktown's abandonment. In return, "Dauntlesses" from Enterprise mortally damaged Hiryu in a strike around 1700 that afternoon. The destruction of the Carrier Strike Force compelled Admiral Yamamoto to abandon his Midway invasion plans, and the Japanese Fleet began to retire westward. During the battle, Japanese destroyers had picked up three U.S. naval aviators from the water. After interrogation, however, all three Americans were murdered. One TBD pilot, Lieutenant George Gay escaped detection by the Japanese ships and was later rescued by a PBY. On 5 June, TF 16 under command of Rear Admiral Spruance pursued the Japanese fleet westward, while work continued to salvage the damaged Yorktown. Both Akagi and Hiryu, damaged the previous day, were scuttled by Japanese destroyers early on the 5th. The last air attacks of the battle took place on 6 June when dive bombers from Enterprise and Hornet bombed and sank heavy cruiser Mikuma, and damaged destroyers Asashio and Arashio,as well as the cruiser Mogami. At Admiral Spruance's expressed orders, issued because of the destruction of three torpedo squadrons on 4 June, "Devastators" from VT-6 that accompanied the strike did not attack because of the threat to them from surface antiaircraft fire. After recovering these planes, TF 16 turned eastward and broke off contact with the enemy. COMINT intercepts over the following two days documented the withdrawal of Japanese forces toward Saipan and the Home Islands. Meanwhile, on the 6th, Japanese submarine I-168 interrupted the U.S. salvage operations, torpedoing Yorktown and torpedoing and sinking destroyer USS Hammann (DD-412). Screening destroyers depth-charged I-168 but the Japanese submarine escaped destruction. Yorktown, suffering from numerous torpedo hits, finally rolled over and sank at dawn on 7 June. (Excerpt for Naval Historical Center)
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June 4, 1942: The Battle of Midway begins.
 
02:02
During the morning of June 4, 1942, after sending planes to attack the U.S. base at Midway, the Japanese carriers Akagi, Kaga and Soryu are fatally damaged by dive bombers from USS Enterprise (CV 6) and USS Yorktown (CV 5). Later in the day, USS Yorktown is abandoned after bomb and torpedo hits by planes from Hiryu. The latter is, in turn, knocked out by U.S. carrier planes. Compelled by their losses to abandon their plans to capture Midway, the Japanese retire westward. The battle is a decisive win for the U.S, bringing an end to Japanese naval superiority in the Pacific.
Просмотров: 1457 U.S. Navy
(10/12) Battlefield I: The Battle of Midway Episode 4 (GDH)
 
10:01
SUBSCRIBE TO EXCELLENT WORLD WAR II VIDEOS UPDATED WEEKLY Just after midnight on 4 June, Admiral Nimitz, based on patrol plane reports, advised Task Forces 16 and 17 of the course and speed of the Japanese "main body," also noting their distance of 574 miles from Midway. Shortly after dawn, a patrol plane spotted two Japanese carriers and their escorts, reporting "Many planes heading Midway from 320 degrees distant 150 miles!" The first attack on 4 June, however, took place when the four night-flying PBYs attacked the Japanese transports northwest of Midway with one PBY torpedoing fleet tanker Akebono Maru. Later that morning, at roughly 0630, Aichi D3A ("Val") carrier bombers and Nakajima B5N ("Kate") torpedo planes, supported by numerous fighters ("Zekes"), bombed Midway Island installations. Although defending U.S. Marine Corps Brewster F2A ("Buffalo") and Grumman F4F ("Wildcat") fighters suffered disastrous losses, losing 17 of 26 aloft, the Japanese only inflicted slight damage to the facilities on Midway. Motor Torpedo Boat PT-25 was also damaged by strafing in Midway lagoon. Over the next two hours, Japanese "Zekes" on Combat Air Patrol (CAP) and antiaircraft fire from the Japanese fleet annihilated the repeated attacks by the American aircraft from Marine Corps Douglas SBD ("Dauntless") and Vought SB2U ("Vindicator") scout bombers from VMSB-241, Navy Grumman TBF ("Avenger") torpedo bombers from VT-8 detachment, and U. S. Army Air Force torpedo-carrying Martin B-26 ("Marauder") bombers sent out to attack the Japanese carriers. Army Air Force "Flying Fortresses" likewise bombed the Japanese carrier force without success, although without losses to themselves. Between 0930 and 1030, Douglas TBD ("Devastator") torpedo bombers from VT 3, VT-6, and VT-8 on the three American carriers attacked the Japanese carriers. Although nearly wiped out by the defending Japanese fighters and antiaircraft fire, they drew off enemy fighters, leaving the skies open for dive bombers from Enterprise and Yorktown. VB-6 and VS-6 "Dauntlesses" from Enterprise bombed and fatally damaged carriers Kaga and Akagi, while VB-3 "Dauntlesses" from Yorktown bombed and wrecked carrier Soryu. American submarine Nautilus (SS-168) then fired torpedoes at the burning Kaga but her torpedoes did not explode. At 1100, the one Japanese carrier that escaped destruction that morning, Hiryu, launched "Val" dive bombers that temporarily disabled Yorktown around noon. Three and a half hours later, Hiryu's "Kate" torpedo planes struck a second blow, forcing Yorktown's abandonment. In return, "Dauntlesses" from Enterprise mortally damaged Hiryu in a strike around 1700 that afternoon. The destruction of the Carrier Strike Force compelled Admiral Yamamoto to abandon his Midway invasion plans, and the Japanese Fleet began to retire westward. During the battle, Japanese destroyers had picked up three U.S. naval aviators from the water. After interrogation, however, all three Americans were murdered. One TBD pilot, Lieutenant George Gay escaped detection by the Japanese ships and was later rescued by a PBY. On 5 June, TF 16 under command of Rear Admiral Spruance pursued the Japanese fleet westward, while work continued to salvage the damaged Yorktown. Both Akagi and Hiryu, damaged the previous day, were scuttled by Japanese destroyers early on the 5th. The last air attacks of the battle took place on 6 June when dive bombers from Enterprise and Hornet bombed and sank heavy cruiser Mikuma, and damaged destroyers Asashio and Arashio,as well as the cruiser Mogami. At Admiral Spruance's expressed orders, issued because of the destruction of three torpedo squadrons on 4 June, "Devastators" from VT-6 that accompanied the strike did not attack because of the threat to them from surface antiaircraft fire. After recovering these planes, TF 16 turned eastward and broke off contact with the enemy. COMINT intercepts over the following two days documented the withdrawal of Japanese forces toward Saipan and the Home Islands. Meanwhile, on the 6th, Japanese submarine I-168 interrupted the U.S. salvage operations, torpedoing Yorktown and torpedoing and sinking destroyer USS Hammann (DD-412). Screening destroyers depth-charged I-168 but the Japanese submarine escaped destruction. Yorktown, suffering from numerous torpedo hits, finally rolled over and sank at dawn on 7 June. (Excerpt for Naval Historical Center)
Просмотров: 21692 HoustonGD
Pearl Harbor: The View From Japan (1994)
 
01:10:04
This seems to me a worth-while DVD; I don't regret buying it. It is somewhat mis-titled, for it actually briefly covers the entire ill-fated Pacific campaign. It has a strong focus on Admiral Yamamoto himself--his foresight and vision as a military leader, and his reluctance to enter into a fight with the U.S. It is interesting to hear a few words from the Japanese perspective, yet it seems that is all you get--a few words. There is little groundwork laid which might explain more fully Japan's reasons for attacking us. The DVD ends abruptly, with no final words of summary or mention of lessons learned. I suppose one can't blame them; they are, after all, reciting a long painful list of defeats which began only six months after the Pearl Harbor "turkey shoot". Nonetheless, though this overview is brief, it succeeds brilliantly, and makes fine use of map diagrams. One comes away with increased clarity about the scope of events in the war in the Pacific. The narration is dubbed over in English, and is outstanding. The DVD is very attractively packaged, using a semi-clear plastic case. Again, a worth-while purchase
Просмотров: 651581 John Douglas
What if Japan Never Attacked Pearl Harbor?
 
09:31
The first 700 people to click this link will get a free 2 month trial to Skillshare http://skl.sh/alternatehistoryhub On this anniversary of the Pearl Harbor attack, let's imagine an alternate scenario where the Japanese never attack. The United States is never involved in the war. What world arises from this? Twitter: https://twitter.com/AltHistoryHub Music: The Hipcat Swagger by Martin Landh Cyanide 3 by Rannar Sillard Cranked 3 by Rannar Sillard Emperors of Tomorrow 1- Rannar Sillard Thrilling Moments 5- Peter Sandberg Crime City 4- Peter Sandberg Heavy Drama 5 - Jonah Hynynen
Просмотров: 1063763 AlternateHistoryHub
First U.S. Air Raid on Tokyo and Japan After Pearl Harbor | 1942 | World War 2 Newsreel
 
09:37
● Please SUPPORT my work on Patreon: https://bit.ly/2LT6opZ ● Visit my 2ND CHANNEL: https://bit.ly/2ILbyX8 ►Facebook: https://bit.ly/2INA7yt ►Twitter: https://bit.ly/2Lz57nY ►Google+: https://bit.ly/2IPz7dl ✚ Watch my "WW2 in the Pacific" PLAYLIST: https://bit.ly/2KUw6ZY It is an amazing vintage newsreel of the Doolittle Raid, the very first air raid by the United States of America on the Japanese capital Tokyo and other military targets on the Japanese home island of Honshu during World War 2. HISTORICAL BACKGROUND / CONTEXT The Doolittle Raid, also known as the Tokyo Raid, on Saturday, April 18, 1942, was an air raid by the United States of America on the Japanese capital Tokyo and other places on the island of Honshu during World War 2, the first air raid to strike the Japanese Home Islands. It demonstrated that Japan itself was vulnerable to American air campaign, served as retaliation for the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor on Sunday, December 7, 1941, and provided an important boost to American morale. The raid was planned and led by Lieutenant Colonel James "Jimmy" Doolittle of the United States Army Air Forces. The bombers were carried by the U.S. Navy's aircraft carrier USS Hornet (CV-8) from Alameda, California to their launch point in the Pacific. At a distance of about 650 miles from Japan, the task force encountered a Japanese picket boat, which radioed a warning to Japan. Although the boat was eliminated by gunfire from the cruiser USS Nashville, Doolittle and Hornet skipper Captain Marc Mitscher decided to launch the aircraft immediately – ten hours earlier and 170 miles farther from Japan than planned. Sixteen B-25B Mitchell medium bombers were launched without fighter escort from the USS Hornet deep in the Western Pacific Ocean, each with a crew of five men. The plan called for them to bomb military targets in Japan, and to continue westward to land in China – landing a medium bomber on Hornet was impossible. Fifteen aircraft reached China, but all crashed, while the 16th landed at Vladivostok in the Soviet Union (today Russia). All but three of the 80 crew members initially survived the mission. Eight airmen were captured by the Japanese Army in China. The B-25 that landed in the Soviet Union was confiscated and its crew interned for more than a year. Fourteen complete crews returned either to the United States or to American forces. After the raid, the Japanese Imperial Army conducted a massive sweep through the eastern coastal provinces of China, in an operation now known as the Zhejiang-Jiangxi Campaign (also known as Operation Sei-go), searching for the surviving American airmen and inflicting retribution on the Chinese who aided them, in an effort to prevent this part of China from being used again for an air raid on Japan. The raid caused negligible material damage to Japan, but it achieved its goal of raising American morale and casting doubt in Japan on the ability of its military leaders to defend their home islands. It also contributed to Admiral Isoroku Yamamoto's decision to attack Midway Island in the Central Pacific – an action that turned into a decisive strategic defeat of the Imperial Japanese Navy by the U.S. Navy in the Battle of Midway between 4 and 7 June 1942. Doolittle, who initially believed that the loss of all his aircraft would lead to his court-martial, received the Medal of Honor and was promoted two steps to brigadier general. The mission was also notable since it was the only time in U.S. Military history that United States Army Air Forces bombers were launched from a U.S. Navy aircraft carrier on a combat mission. First U.S. Air Raid on Tokyo and Japan After Pearl Harbor | 1942 | World War 2 Newsreel TBFA_0072 (DM_0035)
Просмотров: 150930 The Best Film Archives
The Battle of Midway
 
04:03
The Battle of Midway was a decisive naval battle in the Pacific Theater of World War II which occurred between 4 and 7 June 1942, only six months after Japan's attack on Pearl Harbor and one month after the Battle of the Coral Sea.[6][7][8] The United States Navy under Admirals Chester Nimitz, Frank Jack Fletcher, and Raymond A. Spruance defeated an attacking fleet of the Imperial Japanese Navy under Admirals Isoroku Yamamoto, Chūichi Nagumo, and Nobutake Kondō near Midway Atoll, inflicting devastating damage on the Japanese fleet that proved irreparable. Military historian John Keegan called it "the most stunning and decisive blow in the history of naval warfare".[9] The Japanese operation, like the earlier attack on Pearl Harbor, sought to eliminate the United States as a strategic power in the Pacific, thereby giving Japan a free hand in establishing its Greater East Asia Co-Prosperity Sphere. The Japanese hoped another demoralizing defeat would force the U.S. to capitulate in the Pacific War and thus ensure Japanese dominance in the Pacific. Luring the American aircraft carriers into a trap and occupying Midway was part of an overall "barrier" strategy to extend Japan's defensive perimeter, in response to the Doolittle air raid on Tokyo. This operation was also considered preparatory for further attacks against Fiji, Samoa, and Hawaii itself. The plan was handicapped by faulty Japanese assumptions of the American reaction and poor initial dispositions. Most significantly, American cryptographers were able to determine the date and location of the planned attack, enabling the forewarned U.S. Navy to prepare its own ambush. Four Japanese and three American aircraft carriers participated in the battle. All four of Japan's large fleet carriers—Akagi, Kaga, Sōryū and Hiryū, part of the six-carrier force that had attacked Pearl Harbor six months earlier—and a heavy cruiser were sunk, while the U.S. lost the carrier Yorktown and a destroyer. After Midway and the exhausting attrition of the Solomon Islands campaign, Japan's capacity to replace its losses in materiel (particularly aircraft carriers) and men (especially well-trained pilots and maintenance crewmen) rapidly became insufficient to cope with mounting casualties, while the United States' massive industrial and training capabilities made losses far easier to replace. The Battle of Midway, along with the Guadalcanal Campaign, is widely considered a turning point in the Pacific War.
Просмотров: 13 Matthew Cipolla
04/06/1942 Battle of Midway (4–7 June 1942)
 
05:33
Battle of Midway Part of the Pacific Theater of World War II Date 4–7 June 1942 Location Midway Atoll 28°12′N 177°21′WCoordinates: 28°12′N 177°21′W Result Decisive American victory Belligerents United States Japan Commanders and leaders Chester W. Nimitz Frank Jack Fletcher Raymond Spruance Yamamoto Isoroku Kondō Nobutake Nagumo Chūichi Yamaguchi Tamon† Units involved US Naval Jack 48 stars.svg Pacific Fleet Task Force 16 Task Force 17 Midway Garrison USAAF Japan Combined Fleet 1st Fleet 2nd Fleet 5th Fleet 11th Air Fleet Strength 3 carriers 7 heavy cruisers 1 light cruiser 15 destroyers 233 carrier-based aircraft 127 land-based aircraft 16 submarines[1] 4 carriers 2 battleships 2 heavy cruisers 1 light cruiser 12 destroyers 248 carrier-based aircraft[2] 16 floatplanes Did not participate in battle: 2 light carriers 5 battleships 4 heavy cruisers 2 light cruisers ~35 support ships Casualties and losses 1 carrier sunk 1 destroyer sunk ~150 aircraft destroyed 307 killed[3] including 3 killed as prisoners 4 carriers sunk 1 heavy cruiser sunk 1 heavy cruiser damaged 248 aircraft destroyed[4] 3,057 killed[5] 37 captured[6] [show] v t e Hawaiian Islands Campaign [show] v t e Japanese offensives, 1940–1942 [show] v t e Pacific War The Battle of Midway was a decisive naval battle in the Pacific Theater of World War II which occurred between 4 and 7 June 1942, only six months after Japan's attack on Pearl Harbor and one month after the Battle of the Coral Sea.[6][7][8] The United States Navy under Admirals Chester Nimitz, Frank Jack Fletcher, and Raymond A. Spruance defeated an attacking fleet of the Imperial Japanese Navy under Admirals Isoroku Yamamoto, Chuichi Nagumo, and Nobutake Kondo near Midway Atoll, inflicting devastating damage on the Japanese fleet that proved irreparable. Military historian John Keegan called it "the most stunning and decisive blow in the history of naval warfare."[9] The Japanese operation, like the earlier attack on Pearl Harbor, sought to eliminate the United States as a strategic power in the Pacific, thereby giving Japan a free hand in establishing its Greater East Asia Co-Prosperity Sphere. The Japanese hoped another demoralizing defeat would force the U.S. to capitulate in the Pacific War and thus ensure Japanese dominance in the Pacific. Luring the American aircraft carriers into a trap and occupying Midway was part of an overall "barrier" strategy to extend Japan's defensive perimeter, in response to the Doolittle air raid on Tokyo. This operation was also considered preparatory for further attacks against Fiji, Samoa, and Hawaii itself. The plan was handicapped by faulty Japanese assumptions of the American reaction and poor initial dispositions. Most significantly, American cryptographers were able to determine the date and location of the planned attack, enabling the forewarned U.S. Navy to prepare its own ambush. There were seven aircraft carriers involved in the battle and four of Japan's large fleet carriers—Akagi, Kaga, Sōryū and Hiryū, part of the six-carrier force that had attacked Pearl Harbor six months earlier—and a heavy cruiser were sunk, while the U.S. lost only the carrier Yorktown and a destroyer. After Midway and the exhausting attrition of the Solomon Islands campaign, Japan's capacity to replace its losses in materiel (particularly aircraft carriers) and men (especially well-trained pilots and maintenance crewmen) rapidly became insufficient to cope with mounting casualties, while the United States' massive industrial and training capabilities made losses far easier to replace. The Battle of Midway, along with the Guadalcanal Campaign, is widely considered a turning point in the Pacific War.
Просмотров: 37 Roberto Pistarino
Battles of WWII : Midway 4–7 June 1942
 
06:09
The Battle of Midway was a decisive naval battle in the Pacific Theater of World War II which occurred between 4 and 7 June 1942, only six months after Japan's attack on Pearl Harbor and one month after the Battle of the Coral Sea.[6][7][8] The United States Navy under Admirals Chester Nimitz, Frank Jack Fletcher, and Raymond A. Spruance defeated an attacking fleet of the Imperial Japanese Navy under Admirals Isoroku Yamamoto, Chūichi Nagumo, and Nobutake Kondō near Midway Atoll, inflicting devastating damage on the Japanese fleet that proved irreparable. Military historian John Keegan called it "the most stunning and decisive blow in the history of naval warfare".[9] The Japanese operation, like the earlier attack on Pearl Harbor, sought to eliminate the United States as a strategic power in the Pacific, thereby giving Japan a free hand in establishing its Greater East Asia Co-Prosperity Sphere. The Japanese hoped another demoralizing defeat would force the U.S. to capitulate in the Pacific War and thus ensure Japanese dominance in the Pacific. Luring the American aircraft carriers into a trap and occupying Midway was part of an overall "barrier" strategy to extend Japan's defensive perimeter, in response to the Doolittle air raid on Tokyo. This operation was also considered preparatory for further attacks against Fiji, Samoa, and Hawaii itself. The plan was handicapped by faulty Japanese assumptions of the American reaction and poor initial dispositions. Most significantly, American cryptographers were able to determine the date and location of the planned attack, enabling the forewarned U.S. Navy to prepare its own ambush. Four Japanese and three American aircraft carriers participated in the battle. All four of Japan's large fleet carriers—Akagi, Kaga, Sōryū and Hiryū, part of the six-carrier force that had attacked Pearl Harbor six months earlier—and a heavy cruiser were sunk, while the U.S. lost only the carrier Yorktown and a destroyer. After Midway and the exhausting attrition of the Solomon Islands campaign, Japan's capacity to replace its losses in materiel (particularly aircraft carriers) and men (especially well-trained pilots and maintenance crewmen) rapidly became insufficient to cope with mounting casualties, while the United States' massive industrial and training capabilities made losses far easier to replace. The Battle of Midway, along with the Guadalcanal Campaign, is widely considered a turning point in the Pacific War.
Просмотров: 26 Roberto Pistarino
(6/12) Battlefield I: The Battle of Midway Episode 4 (GDH)
 
10:00
SUBSCRIBE TO EXCELLENT WORLD WAR II VIDEOS UPDATED WEEKLY Just after midnight on 4 June, Admiral Nimitz, based on patrol plane reports, advised Task Forces 16 and 17 of the course and speed of the Japanese "main body," also noting their distance of 574 miles from Midway. Shortly after dawn, a patrol plane spotted two Japanese carriers and their escorts, reporting "Many planes heading Midway from 320 degrees distant 150 miles!" The first attack on 4 June, however, took place when the four night-flying PBYs attacked the Japanese transports northwest of Midway with one PBY torpedoing fleet tanker Akebono Maru. Later that morning, at roughly 0630, Aichi D3A ("Val") carrier bombers and Nakajima B5N ("Kate") torpedo planes, supported by numerous fighters ("Zekes"), bombed Midway Island installations. Although defending U.S. Marine Corps Brewster F2A ("Buffalo") and Grumman F4F ("Wildcat") fighters suffered disastrous losses, losing 17 of 26 aloft, the Japanese only inflicted slight damage to the facilities on Midway. Motor Torpedo Boat PT-25 was also damaged by strafing in Midway lagoon. Over the next two hours, Japanese "Zekes" on Combat Air Patrol (CAP) and antiaircraft fire from the Japanese fleet annihilated the repeated attacks by the American aircraft from Marine Corps Douglas SBD ("Dauntless") and Vought SB2U ("Vindicator") scout bombers from VMSB-241, Navy Grumman TBF ("Avenger") torpedo bombers from VT-8 detachment, and U. S. Army Air Force torpedo-carrying Martin B-26 ("Marauder") bombers sent out to attack the Japanese carriers. Army Air Force "Flying Fortresses" likewise bombed the Japanese carrier force without success, although without losses to themselves. Between 0930 and 1030, Douglas TBD ("Devastator") torpedo bombers from VT 3, VT-6, and VT-8 on the three American carriers attacked the Japanese carriers. Although nearly wiped out by the defending Japanese fighters and antiaircraft fire, they drew off enemy fighters, leaving the skies open for dive bombers from Enterprise and Yorktown. VB-6 and VS-6 "Dauntlesses" from Enterprise bombed and fatally damaged carriers Kaga and Akagi, while VB-3 "Dauntlesses" from Yorktown bombed and wrecked carrier Soryu. American submarine Nautilus (SS-168) then fired torpedoes at the burning Kaga but her torpedoes did not explode. At 1100, the one Japanese carrier that escaped destruction that morning, Hiryu, launched "Val" dive bombers that temporarily disabled Yorktown around noon. Three and a half hours later, Hiryu's "Kate" torpedo planes struck a second blow, forcing Yorktown's abandonment. In return, "Dauntlesses" from Enterprise mortally damaged Hiryu in a strike around 1700 that afternoon. The destruction of the Carrier Strike Force compelled Admiral Yamamoto to abandon his Midway invasion plans, and the Japanese Fleet began to retire westward. During the battle, Japanese destroyers had picked up three U.S. naval aviators from the water. After interrogation, however, all three Americans were murdered. One TBD pilot, Lieutenant George Gay escaped detection by the Japanese ships and was later rescued by a PBY. On 5 June, TF 16 under command of Rear Admiral Spruance pursued the Japanese fleet westward, while work continued to salvage the damaged Yorktown. Both Akagi and Hiryu, damaged the previous day, were scuttled by Japanese destroyers early on the 5th. The last air attacks of the battle took place on 6 June when dive bombers from Enterprise and Hornet bombed and sank heavy cruiser Mikuma, and damaged destroyers Asashio and Arashio,as well as the cruiser Mogami. At Admiral Spruance's expressed orders, issued because of the destruction of three torpedo squadrons on 4 June, "Devastators" from VT-6 that accompanied the strike did not attack because of the threat to them from surface antiaircraft fire. After recovering these planes, TF 16 turned eastward and broke off contact with the enemy. COMINT intercepts over the following two days documented the withdrawal of Japanese forces toward Saipan and the Home Islands. Meanwhile, on the 6th, Japanese submarine I-168 interrupted the U.S. salvage operations, torpedoing Yorktown and torpedoing and sinking destroyer USS Hammann (DD-412). Screening destroyers depth-charged I-168 but the Japanese submarine escaped destruction. Yorktown, suffering from numerous torpedo hits, finally rolled over and sank at dawn on 7 June. (Excerpt for Naval Historical Center)
Просмотров: 9804 HoustonGD
(3/12) Battlefield I: The Battle of Midway Episode 4 (GDH)
 
10:01
SUBSCRIBE TO EXCELLENT WORLD WAR II VIDEOS UPDATED WEEKLY Just after midnight on 4 June, Admiral Nimitz, based on patrol plane reports, advised Task Forces 16 and 17 of the course and speed of the Japanese "main body," also noting their distance of 574 miles from Midway. Shortly after dawn, a patrol plane spotted two Japanese carriers and their escorts, reporting "Many planes heading Midway from 320 degrees distant 150 miles!" The first attack on 4 June, however, took place when the four night-flying PBYs attacked the Japanese transports northwest of Midway with one PBY torpedoing fleet tanker Akebono Maru. Later that morning, at roughly 0630, Aichi D3A ("Val") carrier bombers and Nakajima B5N ("Kate") torpedo planes, supported by numerous fighters ("Zekes"), bombed Midway Island installations. Although defending U.S. Marine Corps Brewster F2A ("Buffalo") and Grumman F4F ("Wildcat") fighters suffered disastrous losses, losing 17 of 26 aloft, the Japanese only inflicted slight damage to the facilities on Midway. Motor Torpedo Boat PT-25 was also damaged by strafing in Midway lagoon. Over the next two hours, Japanese "Zekes" on Combat Air Patrol (CAP) and antiaircraft fire from the Japanese fleet annihilated the repeated attacks by the American aircraft from Marine Corps Douglas SBD ("Dauntless") and Vought SB2U ("Vindicator") scout bombers from VMSB-241, Navy Grumman TBF ("Avenger") torpedo bombers from VT-8 detachment, and U. S. Army Air Force torpedo-carrying Martin B-26 ("Marauder") bombers sent out to attack the Japanese carriers. Army Air Force "Flying Fortresses" likewise bombed the Japanese carrier force without success, although without losses to themselves. Between 0930 and 1030, Douglas TBD ("Devastator") torpedo bombers from VT 3, VT-6, and VT-8 on the three American carriers attacked the Japanese carriers. Although nearly wiped out by the defending Japanese fighters and antiaircraft fire, they drew off enemy fighters, leaving the skies open for dive bombers from Enterprise and Yorktown. VB-6 and VS-6 "Dauntlesses" from Enterprise bombed and fatally damaged carriers Kaga and Akagi, while VB-3 "Dauntlesses" from Yorktown bombed and wrecked carrier Soryu. American submarine Nautilus (SS-168) then fired torpedoes at the burning Kaga but her torpedoes did not explode. At 1100, the one Japanese carrier that escaped destruction that morning, Hiryu, launched "Val" dive bombers that temporarily disabled Yorktown around noon. Three and a half hours later, Hiryu's "Kate" torpedo planes struck a second blow, forcing Yorktown's abandonment. In return, "Dauntlesses" from Enterprise mortally damaged Hiryu in a strike around 1700 that afternoon. The destruction of the Carrier Strike Force compelled Admiral Yamamoto to abandon his Midway invasion plans, and the Japanese Fleet began to retire westward. During the battle, Japanese destroyers had picked up three U.S. naval aviators from the water. After interrogation, however, all three Americans were murdered. One TBD pilot, Lieutenant George Gay escaped detection by the Japanese ships and was later rescued by a PBY. On 5 June, TF 16 under command of Rear Admiral Spruance pursued the Japanese fleet westward, while work continued to salvage the damaged Yorktown. Both Akagi and Hiryu, damaged the previous day, were scuttled by Japanese destroyers early on the 5th. The last air attacks of the battle took place on 6 June when dive bombers from Enterprise and Hornet bombed and sank heavy cruiser Mikuma, and damaged destroyers Asashio and Arashio,as well as the cruiser Mogami. At Admiral Spruance's expressed orders, issued because of the destruction of three torpedo squadrons on 4 June, "Devastators" from VT-6 that accompanied the strike did not attack because of the threat to them from surface antiaircraft fire. After recovering these planes, TF 16 turned eastward and broke off contact with the enemy. COMINT intercepts over the following two days documented the withdrawal of Japanese forces toward Saipan and the Home Islands. Meanwhile, on the 6th, Japanese submarine I-168 interrupted the U.S. salvage operations, torpedoing Yorktown and torpedoing and sinking destroyer USS Hammann (DD-412). Screening destroyers depth-charged I-168 but the Japanese submarine escaped destruction. Yorktown, suffering from numerous torpedo hits, finally rolled over and sank at dawn on 7 June. (Excerpt for Naval Historical Center)
Просмотров: 10423 HoustonGD
Submarine Attack Plans Of World War II Documentary
 
44:22
Best Military Tactical LED Flashlight Now On Amazon: https://amzn.to/2DNEeMY
Просмотров: 429948 History Of Wars
The Battle Of Midway (Documentary) (Part 2 of 4)
 
14:01
Do You want to start profiting from our digital funds platform investment plans today and every day from now on? Invest Now here: https://laser.online/?referrer=starfinder984 The Battle Of Midway was one of the most important naval battles of the Pacific Campaign of World War II. Between 4 and 7 June 1942, only six months after Japan's attack on Pearl Harbor, and one month after the Battle of the Coral Sea, the United States Navy decisively defeated an Imperial Japanese Navy (IJN) attack against Midway Atoll, inflicting irreparable damage on the Japanese fleet. Military historian John Keegan called it "the most stunning and decisive blow in the history of naval warfare." It was Japan's worst naval defeat in 350 years. If you like PC Games visit: http://www.freemmorpgtoplay.com/
Просмотров: 18370 Dietrolafacciata
Pearl Harbour: The 77th anniversary of the Japanese attack
 
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On the morning of December 7, 1941, 183 aircraft of Imperial Japanese Navy attacked the United States naval base at Pearl Harbour on Oahu Island, Hawaii. This attack was a preventive measure taken by Japan to keep the US Pacific Fleet away from interfering with its planned military actions in Southeast Asia against the United Kingdom, the Netherlands, and the United States. The attack killed more than 2,300 Americans and completely damaged the American battleship. A total of 12 ships sank and 9 other damaged and 160 aircraft were destroyed and 150 damaged. This attack was termed as the Hawaii Operation and Operation AI and as Operation Z during its planning and marked the entry of United States entry into World War II. President Franklin D. Roosevelt called December 7, 1941, as ‘a date which will live in infamy’. Subscribe to Times Of India's Youtube channel here: http://goo.gl/WgIatu Also Subscribe to Bombay Times Youtube Channel here: http://goo.gl/AdXcgU Social Media Links: Facebook : https://www.facebook.com/TimesofIndia Twitter : https://twitter.com/timesofindia Google + : https://plus.google.com/u/0/+timesindia/posts
Просмотров: 5119 The Times of India
(11/12) Battlefield I: The Battle of Midway Episode 4 (GDH)
 
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SUBSCRIBE TO EXCELLENT WORLD WAR II VIDEOS UPDATED WEEKLY Just after midnight on 4 June, Admiral Nimitz, based on patrol plane reports, advised Task Forces 16 and 17 of the course and speed of the Japanese "main body," also noting their distance of 574 miles from Midway. Shortly after dawn, a patrol plane spotted two Japanese carriers and their escorts, reporting "Many planes heading Midway from 320 degrees distant 150 miles!" The first attack on 4 June, however, took place when the four night-flying PBYs attacked the Japanese transports northwest of Midway with one PBY torpedoing fleet tanker Akebono Maru. Later that morning, at roughly 0630, Aichi D3A ("Val") carrier bombers and Nakajima B5N ("Kate") torpedo planes, supported by numerous fighters ("Zekes"), bombed Midway Island installations. Although defending U.S. Marine Corps Brewster F2A ("Buffalo") and Grumman F4F ("Wildcat") fighters suffered disastrous losses, losing 17 of 26 aloft, the Japanese only inflicted slight damage to the facilities on Midway. Motor Torpedo Boat PT-25 was also damaged by strafing in Midway lagoon. Over the next two hours, Japanese "Zekes" on Combat Air Patrol (CAP) and antiaircraft fire from the Japanese fleet annihilated the repeated attacks by the American aircraft from Marine Corps Douglas SBD ("Dauntless") and Vought SB2U ("Vindicator") scout bombers from VMSB-241, Navy Grumman TBF ("Avenger") torpedo bombers from VT-8 detachment, and U. S. Army Air Force torpedo-carrying Martin B-26 ("Marauder") bombers sent out to attack the Japanese carriers. Army Air Force "Flying Fortresses" likewise bombed the Japanese carrier force without success, although without losses to themselves. Between 0930 and 1030, Douglas TBD ("Devastator") torpedo bombers from VT 3, VT-6, and VT-8 on the three American carriers attacked the Japanese carriers. Although nearly wiped out by the defending Japanese fighters and antiaircraft fire, they drew off enemy fighters, leaving the skies open for dive bombers from Enterprise and Yorktown. VB-6 and VS-6 "Dauntlesses" from Enterprise bombed and fatally damaged carriers Kaga and Akagi, while VB-3 "Dauntlesses" from Yorktown bombed and wrecked carrier Soryu. American submarine Nautilus (SS-168) then fired torpedoes at the burning Kaga but her torpedoes did not explode. At 1100, the one Japanese carrier that escaped destruction that morning, Hiryu, launched "Val" dive bombers that temporarily disabled Yorktown around noon. Three and a half hours later, Hiryu's "Kate" torpedo planes struck a second blow, forcing Yorktown's abandonment. In return, "Dauntlesses" from Enterprise mortally damaged Hiryu in a strike around 1700 that afternoon. The destruction of the Carrier Strike Force compelled Admiral Yamamoto to abandon his Midway invasion plans, and the Japanese Fleet began to retire westward. During the battle, Japanese destroyers had picked up three U.S. naval aviators from the water. After interrogation, however, all three Americans were murdered. One TBD pilot, Lieutenant George Gay escaped detection by the Japanese ships and was later rescued by a PBY. On 5 June, TF 16 under command of Rear Admiral Spruance pursued the Japanese fleet westward, while work continued to salvage the damaged Yorktown. Both Akagi and Hiryu, damaged the previous day, were scuttled by Japanese destroyers early on the 5th. The last air attacks of the battle took place on 6 June when dive bombers from Enterprise and Hornet bombed and sank heavy cruiser Mikuma, and damaged destroyers Asashio and Arashio,as well as the cruiser Mogami. At Admiral Spruance's expressed orders, issued because of the destruction of three torpedo squadrons on 4 June, "Devastators" from VT-6 that accompanied the strike did not attack because of the threat to them from surface antiaircraft fire. After recovering these planes, TF 16 turned eastward and broke off contact with the enemy. COMINT intercepts over the following two days documented the withdrawal of Japanese forces toward Saipan and the Home Islands. Meanwhile, on the 6th, Japanese submarine I-168 interrupted the U.S. salvage operations, torpedoing Yorktown and torpedoing and sinking destroyer USS Hammann (DD-412). Screening destroyers depth-charged I-168 but the Japanese submarine escaped destruction. Yorktown, suffering from numerous torpedo hits, finally rolled over and sank at dawn on 7 June. (Excerpt for Naval Historical Center)
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USS YORKTOWN AT THE BATTLE OF THE CORAL SEA & RUSSIAN OFFENSIVE NEWSREEL 1942 70862
 
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This sound newsreel dates from 1942 and begins with the fighting on the Eastern Front as Russian forces defend Stalingrad. As shown in the film, they eventually force the German Sixth Army to surrender, a major turning point in the war. The second half of the film shows events in the Pacific, where a U.S. carrier task force led by "Carrier X" (actually the USS Yorktown with USS Lexington) battles Japanese planes in the Battle of the Coral Sea. (Apparently due to secrecy concerns the newsreel commentators were forbidden from actually naming the carrier shown in the film). The Battle of the Coral Sea, fought during 4–8 May 1942, was a major naval battle in the Pacific Theater of World War II between the Imperial Japanese Navy and naval and air forces from the United States and Australia. The battle was the first action in which aircraft carriers engaged each other, as well as the first in which neither side's ships sighted or fired directly upon the other. In an attempt to strengthen their defensive positioning for their empire in the South Pacific, Japanese forces decided to invade and occupy Port Moresby in New Guinea and Tulagi in the southeastern Solomon Islands. The plan to accomplish this, called Operation MO, involved several major units of Japan's Combined Fleet, including two fleet carriers and a light carrier to provide air cover for the invasion fleets, under the overall command of Japanese Admiral Shigeyoshi Inoue. The US learned of the Japanese plan through signals intelligence and sent two United States Navy carrier task forces and a joint Australian-American cruiser force, under the overall command of American Admiral Frank J. Fletcher, to oppose the Japanese offensive. On 3–4 May, Japanese forces successfully invaded and occupied Tulagi, although several of their supporting warships were surprised and sunk or damaged by aircraft from the US fleet carrier Yorktown. Now aware of the presence of US carriers in the area, the Japanese fleet carriers advanced towards the Coral Sea with the intention of finding and destroying the Allied naval forces. Beginning on 7 May, the carrier forces from the two sides exchanged airstrikes over two consecutive days. The first day, the US sank the Japanese light carrier Shōhō, while the Japanese sank a US destroyer and heavily damaged a fleet oiler (which was later scuttled). The next day, the Japanese fleet carrier Shōkaku was heavily damaged, the US fleet carrier Lexington was critically damaged (and was scuttled as a result), and the Yorktown was damaged. With both sides having suffered heavy losses in aircraft and carriers damaged or sunk, the two fleets disengaged and retired from the battle area. Because of the loss of carrier air cover, Inoue recalled the Port Moresby invasion fleet, intending to try again later. Although a tactical victory for the Japanese in terms of ships sunk, the battle would prove to be a strategic victory for the Allies for several reasons. The battle marked the first time since the start of the war that a major Japanese advance had been checked by the Allies. More importantly, the Japanese fleet carriers Shōkaku and Zuikaku – one damaged and the other with a depleted aircraft complement – were unable to participate in the Battle of Midway, which took place the following month, ensuring a rough parity in aircraft between the two adversaries and contributing significantly to the US victory in that battle. The severe losses in carriers at Midway prevented the Japanese from reattempting to invade Port Moresby from the ocean. Two months later, the Allies took advantage of Japan's resulting strategic vulnerability in the South Pacific and launched the Guadalcanal Campaign that, along with the New Guinea Campaign, eventually broke Japanese defenses in the South Pacific and was a significant contributing factor to Japan's ultimate defeat in World War II. This film is part of the Periscope Film LLC archive, one of the largest historic military, transportation, and aviation stock footage collections in the USA. Entirely film backed, this material is available for licensing in 24p HD. For more information visit http://www.PeriscopeFilm.com
Просмотров: 30327 PeriscopeFilm
Battle of Okinawa | Japanese Kamikaze Attacks on US Ships | Pacific War | US Navy Documentary | 1945
 
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● Please SUPPORT my work on Patreon: https://bit.ly/2LT6opZ ● Visit my 2ND CHANNEL: https://bit.ly/2ILbyX8 ►Facebook: https://bit.ly/2INA7yt ►Twitter: https://bit.ly/2Lz57nY ►Google+: https://bit.ly/2IPz7dl ✚ Watch my "WW2 in the Pacific" PLAYLIST: https://bit.ly/2KUw6ZY This film (originally titled as The Fleet that Came to Stay) is a 1945 U.S. Navy documentary about the naval engagements of the Okinawa Campaign in World War 2. It details the aerial and naval battles that raged during the invasion of Okinawa. The film shows the invasion from the U.S. Navy point of view and explains why the U.S. fleet had to remain at the base even under constant Japanese kamikaze attacks. Battle of Okinawa was the most devastating air-sea battle of all time. HISTORICAL BACKGROUND / CONTEXT About the Battle of Okinawa: The Battle of Okinawa (Japanese: 沖縄戦), codenamed Operation Iceberg, was a series of battles fought in the Japanese Ryukyu Islands, centered on the island of Okinawa, and included the largest amphibious assault in the Pacific War during World War 2, the 1 April 1945 invasion of Okinawa itself. The 82-day-long battle lasted from 1 April until 22 June 1945. After a long campaign of island hopping, the Allies were planning to use Okinawa, a large island only 340 mi (550 km) away from mainland Japan, as a base for air operations for the planned invasion of Honshu, the Japanese mainland. The United States created the Tenth Army, a cross-branch force consisting of the 7th, 27th, 77th, and 96th infantry divisions of the U.S. Army with the 1st and 6th divisions of the Marines Corps, to fight on the island. The Tenth was unique in that it had its own tactical air force (joint Army-Marine command), and was also supported by combined naval and amphibious forces. The battle has been referred to as the "typhoon of steel" in English, and tetsu no ame ("rain of steel") in Japanese. The nicknames refer to the ferocity of the fighting, the intensity of Japanese kamikaze attacks, and the sheer numbers of Allied ships and armored vehicles that assaulted the island. The battle was one of the most devastating in the Pacific, with an estimated total of over 82,000 direct casualties on both sides. As part of the naval operations surrounding the battle, the Japanese battleship Yamato was sunk, and both sides lost considerable numbers of ships and aircraft. After the battle, Okinawa provided a fleet anchorage, troop staging areas, and airfields in proximity to Japan in preparation for the planned invasion. The Japanese had used kamikaze tactics since the Battle of Leyte Gulf (23–26 October 1944), but for the first time, they became a major part of the defense. Between the American landing on 1 April and 25 May, seven major kamikaze attacks were attempted, involving more than 1,500 planes. While no major Allied warships were lost, several fleet carriers were severely damaged. The British Pacific Fleet, was assigned the task of neutralizing the Japanese airfields in the Sakishima Islands (part of the Ryukyu Islands), which it did successfully from 26 March to 10 April. On 10 April, its attention was shifted to airfields on northern Formosa. Several kamikaze attacks caused significant damage, but since the British used armored flight decks on their aircraft carriers, they only experienced a brief interruption to their force's objective. About the Kamikaze: Kamikaze (神風, "divine wind" or "spirit wind") were suicide attacks by military aviators from the Empire of Japan against Allied naval vessels in the closing stages of the Pacific campaign of World War 2, designed to destroy warships more effectively than was possible with conventional attacks. During World War 2, about 3,860 kamikaze pilots died, and about 19% of kamikaze attacks managed to hit a ship. Kamikaze aircraft were essentially pilot-guided explosive missiles, purpose-built or converted from conventional aircraft. Pilots would attempt to crash their aircraft into enemy ships. The tradition of death instead of defeat, capture, and perceived shame was deeply entrenched in Japanese military culture. It was one of the primary traditions in the samurai life and the Bushido code: loyalty and honour until death, as the Japanese perceived it. Battle of Okinawa | Japanese Kamikaze Attacks on US Ships | Pacific War | US Navy Documentary | 1945
Просмотров: 491121 The Best Film Archives
Battle of Savo Island 1942: America's Worst Naval Defeat
 
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(Animated Map) - WARNING: lower the volume if you are using headphones. sorry for the audio. I do not own the rights to the songs or images. This video is purely for educational purposes. Credit- No copyright intended, all Image rights go to: -Wikipedia Commons https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Savo_Island -Naval History Heritage and Command https://www.history.navy.mil/ -Portrait of Richmond K. Turner https://www.ibiblio.org/hyperwar/OnlineLibrary/photos/images/g600000/g607995.jpg -USS Jarvis http://www.navsource.org/ Images contained on this site that are donated from private sources are © copyrighted by the respective owner. Images credited to the National Archives (NA, NARA); Naval History & Heritage Command (NHHC), formerly Naval Historical Center (NHC); and U.S. Navy (USN) are believed to be in the public domain. Some images credited to the United States Naval Institute (USNI) are from © copyrighted collections, the rest are believed to be in the public domain. No copyright intended, all MUSIC rights go to: All songs by Ross Budgen https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQKGLOK2FqmVgVwYferltKQ/featured -"Welcome to Chaos” -"House Lannister Theme - Game of Thrones Season 4 (Original Composition)” -"Run" -"Parallel” Sources- Hammel, E. (2017, March 6). First Battle of Savo Island: The U.S. Navy’s Worst Defeat. Retrieved August 25, 2017, from http://warfarehistorynetwork.com/daily/wwii/first-battle-of-savo-island-the-u-s-navys-worst-defeat/ Hornfischer, J. D. (2011). Neptunes inferno: the U.S. Navy at Guadalcanal. New York: Bantam Books. Newcomb, R. F., & Newcomb, R. F. (2002). The battle of Savo Island. New York: H. Holt. Stille, M. (2013). The Naval Battles for Guadacanal 1942 (Vol. 225). Oxford, UK: Osprey Publishing. Toll, I. W. (2016). The conquering tide: war in the Pacific Islands, 1942-1944. New York: W.W. Norton & Company. USMC Casualty list taken from: https://www.ibiblio.org/hyperwar/USMC/Guadalcanal/USMC-M-Guadalcanal-A.html
Просмотров: 1412896 Montemayor
What if America Had Invaded Japan? (Operation Downfall)
 
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At the end of World War II, the U.S was ready to take down the Japanese by force. This was Operation Downfall, the alternate invasion of Japan which would have happened had Japan not surrendered. Can Humans Survive Nuclear Winter? (LifeNoggin): http://bit.ly/2hXjF59 Follow on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AltHistoryHub Music by myuuji: https://www.youtube.com/user/myuuji Opening Song by GWScores: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6nzkXxXjwxE An entire channel dedicated to the 'What If?". Using knowledge of geography, population and other historical facts I predict what could have happened had things gone differently in history. Learn about how the world would be different if, the Axis won World War II, if America lost the Revolution, or if Reagan was never president. I do pop culture videos which explored the worlds of Fallout and the Purge. Learn controversial topics such as if Christianity never existed and many other subjects.
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The Battle Of Midway (Documentary) (Part 1 of 4)
 
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Do You want to start profiting from our digital funds platform investment plans today and every day from now on? Invest Now here: https://laser.online/?referrer=starfinder984 The Battle Of Midway was one of the most important naval battles of the Pacific Campaign of World War II. Between 4 and 7 June 1942, only six months after Japan's attack on Pearl Harbor, and one month after the Battle of the Coral Sea, the United States Navy decisively defeated an Imperial Japanese Navy (IJN) attack against Midway Atoll, inflicting irreparable damage on the Japanese fleet. Military historian John Keegan called it "the most stunning and decisive blow in the history of naval warfare." It was Japan's worst naval defeat in 350 years. If you like PC Games visit: http://www.freemmorpgtoplay.com/
Просмотров: 31816 Dietrolafacciata
Doolittle Raid: "Carrier... Attack on Tokyo" 1943 US OWI United News Newsreel WWII
 
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Newsreels playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL_hX5wLdhf_LP5toWZWKBpDsi7dZYZ6Q5 World War II playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL3E5ED4749AE3CD2C more at http://quickfound.net "Carrier Revealed as Base for Attack on Tokyo": "B-25 planes take off from the carrier Hornet to bomb Japan. Gen. Doolittle directs the operation. In Chungking Chiang Kai-shek greets Doolittle." US Office of War Information United News Newsreel. Public domain film from the US National Archives, slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio corrected, and one-pass brightness-contrast-color correction & mild video noise reduction applied. The soundtrack was also processed with volume normalization, noise reduction, clipping reduction, and/or equalization (the resulting sound, though not perfect, is far less noisy than the original). https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Doolittle_Raid Wikipedia license: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ The Doolittle Raid, also known as the Tokyo Raid, on Saturday, April 18, 1942, was an air raid by the United States of America on the Japanese capital Tokyo and other places on the island of Honshu during World War II, the first air strike to strike the Japanese Home Islands. It demonstrated that Japan itself was vulnerable to American air attack, served as retaliation for the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor on Sunday, December 7, 1941, and provided an important boost to American morale. The raid was planned and led by Lieutenant Colonel James "Jimmy" Doolittle of the United States Army Air Forces. Sixteen B-25B Mitchell medium bombers were launched without fighter escort from the U.S. Navy's aircraft carrier USS Hornet (CV-8) deep in the Western Pacific Ocean, each with a crew of five men. The plan called for them to bomb military targets in Japan, and to continue westward to land in China—landing a medium bomber on Hornet was impossible. Fifteen aircraft reached China, but all crashed, while the 16th landed at Vladivostok in the Soviet Union. All but three of the 80 crew members initially survived the mission. Eight airmen were captured by the Japanese Army in China; three of those were later executed. The B-25 that landed in the Soviet Union was confiscated and its crew interned for more than a year. Fourteen complete crews, except for one crewman who was killed in action, returned either to the United States or to American forces. After the raid, the Japanese Imperial Army conducted a massive sweep through the eastern coastal provinces of China, in an operation now known as the Zhejiang-Jiangxi campaign, searching for the surviving American airmen and inflicting retribution on the Chinese who aided them, in an effort to prevent this part of China from being used again for an attack on Japan. The raid caused negligible material damage to Japan, but it achieved its goal of raising American morale and casting doubt in Japan on the ability of its military leaders to defend their home islands. It also contributed to Admiral Isoroku Yamamoto's decision to attack Midway Island in the Central Pacific—an attack that turned into a decisive strategic defeat of the Imperial Japanese Navy (IJN) by the U.S. Navy in the Battle of Midway. Doolittle, who initially believed that the loss of all his aircraft would lead to his court-martial, received the Medal of Honor and was promoted two steps to brigadier general...
Просмотров: 23738 Jeff Quitney
Japanese Navy - US Intelligence Assessments 1920-1941 #Navy Chat
 
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» HOW YOU CAN SUPPORT MILITARY HISTORY VISUALIZED « (A) You can support my channel on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/mhv (B) Alternatively, you can also buy "Spoils of War" (merchandise) in my online shop: https://www.redbubble.com/people/mhvis/shop (C) If you want to buy books that I use or recommend, here is the link to the Amazon Store: http://astore.amazon.com/ytmh-20 which has the same price for you and gives a small commission to me, thus it is a win/win. » SOCIAL MEDIA LINKS « facebook: https://www.facebook.com/milhistoryvisualized/ twitter: https://twitter.com/MilHiVisualized tumblr: http://militaryhistoryvisualized.tumblr.com/ » SOURCES & LINKS « Pyke, Justin Zachary: Blinded by the Rising Sun? American Intelligence Assessments of Japanese Air and Naval Power, 1920-1941 http://theses.ucalgary.ca/bitstream/11023/2890/1/ucalgary_2016_pyke_justin.pdf Further References Asada Sadao. From Mahan to Pearl Harbor: The Imperial Japanese Navy and the United States. Annapolis: Naval Institute Press, 2006. amazon.com (affiliate link): http://amzn.to/2fmljsD Barnhart, Michael A. Japan Prepares for Total War: The Search for Economic Security, 1919-1941. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1987. amazon.com (affiliate link): http://amzn.to/2fmjPOL Evans, David and Mark R. Peattie. Kaigun: Strategy, Tactics and Technology in the Imperial Japanese Navy, 1887-1941. Annapolis: Naval Institute Press, 2012. amazon.com (affiliate link): http://amzn.to/2fSlfVG Ferris, John. Intelligence and Strategy: Selected Essays. New York: Routledge, 2005. amazon.com (affiliate link): http://amzn.to/2fyn2eE Ford, Douglas. “A Statement of Hopes? The effectiveness of US and British naval war plans against Japan, 1920-1941.” The Mariner’s Mirror 101:1 (2015): 63-80. Ford, Douglas. The Elusive Enemy: U.S. Naval Intelligence and the Imperial Japanese Fleet. Annapolis: Naval Institute Press, 2011. amazon.com (affiliate link): http://amzn.to/2eDjGoM Ford, Douglas. “US Naval Intelligence and the Imperial Japanese Fleet during the Washington Treaty Era, c. 1922-36.” The Mariner’s Mirror 93:3 (2007): 281-306. Hone, Trent. “‘Give Them Hell’: The US Navy’s Night Combat Doctrine and the Campaign for Guadalcanal.” War in History 13:2 (2006): 171-199. Hornfischer, James D. Neptune’s Inferno: The U.S. Navy at Guadalcanal. New York: Bantam Books, 2011. amazon.com (affiliate link): http://amzn.to/2eDbDII Kuehn, John T. Agents of Innovation: The General Board and the Design of the Fleet that Defeated the Japanese Navy. Annapolis: Naval Institute Press, 2008. amazon.com (affiliate link): http://amzn.to/2eUd863 Lundgren, Robert. The World Wonder’d: What Really Happened off Samar. Ann Arbor: Nimble Books, 2014. amazon.com (affiliate link): http://amzn.to/2fSqDIg Mahnken, Thomas G. “Asymmetric Warfare at Sea: The Naval Battles off Guadalcanal, 1942-1943.” Naval War College Review 64:1 (2011): 95-121. Mahnken, Thomas G. Uncovering Ways of War: U.S. Intelligence and Foreign Military Innovation, 1918-1941. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 2002. Muir Jr., Malcolm. “Rearming in a Vacuum: United States Navy Intelligence and the Japanese Capital Ship Threat, 1936-1945.” The Journal of Military History, 54:4 (1990): 473-485. Parshall, Jonathan B. “Oil and Japanese Strategy in the Solomons: A Postulate.” In Imperial Japanese Navy Page, http://www.combinedfleet.com/guadoil1.htm (22 November 2015). Parshall, Jonathan B. and Anthony P. Tully. Shattered Sword: The Untold Story of the Battle of Midway. Washington D.C.: Potomac Books, 2005. amazon.com (affiliate link): http://amzn.to/2fDIuOe Prados, John. Combined Fleet Decoded: The Secret History of American Intelligence and the Japanese Navy in World War II. New York: Random House, 1995. amazon.com (affiliate link): http://amzn.to/2fSrg4M Tully, Anthony and Lu Yu. “A Question of Estimates: How Faulty Intelligence Drove Scouting at the Battle of Midway.” Naval War College Review 68:2 (2015): 85-99. *See the complete bibliography in the thesis itself. » CREDITS & SPECIAL THX « Song: Ethan Meixsell - Demilitarized Zone The Counter-Design is heavily inspired by Black ICE Mod for the game Hearts of Iron 3 by Paradox Interactive https://forum.paradoxplaza.com/forum/index.php?forums/blackice.467/ » DISCLAIMER « Amazon Associates Program: “Bernhard Kast is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to amazon.com.” Bernhard Kast ist Teilnehmer des Partnerprogramms von Amazon Europe S.à.r.l. und Partner des Werbeprogramms, das zur Bereitstellung eines Mediums für Websites konzipiert wurde, mittels dessen durch die Platzierung von Werbeanzeigen und Links zu amazon.de Werbekostenerstattung verdient werden können.
Просмотров: 28330 Military History Visualized
FORTRESS   True Story (Full Movie)
 
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The story of a B-17 Flying Fortress in the middle of the II World War.
Просмотров: 11967910 Dédime Campos