Home
Search results “Displaced fibula fracture and arthritis”
10 Step Cure for Ankle Sprain & or Fibula Fracture. Exercises & Rehab
 
12:13
"Famous" Physical Therapists Bob Schrupp and Brad Heineck demonstrate a 10 step program to rehab an ankle sprain and or fibula fracture. Make sure to like us on FaceBook https://www.facebook.com/Physical-Therapy-317002538489676/timeline/ Check out the Products Bob and Brad LOVE on their Amazon Channel: https://www.amazon.com/shop/physicaltherapyvideo Follow us on Twitter https://twitter.com/PtFamous Our book “Three Simple Steps To Treat Back Pain” is available on Kindle http://www.amazon.com/Three-Simple-Steps-Treat-Back-ebook/dp/B00BPU4O5G/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1444092626&sr=8-1&keywords=3+simple+steps+to+treat+back+pain WANT TO HELP TRANSLATE OUR VIDEOS? We would so love the help. http://www.youtube.com/timedtext_cs_panel?tab=2&c=UCmTe0LsfEbpkDpgrxKAWbRA
Views: 38228 physicaltherapyvideo
Ankle Fractures & X Rays - Everything You Need To Know - Dr. Nabil Ebraheim
 
05:12
Dr. Ebraheim’s educational animated video describes about fractures of the ankle X - rays, ankle fracture classification,ankle fracture dislocation, it also describes ankle fracture treatment and ankle fracture surgery and ankle fracture recovery. The Mortise view is about 15° of internal rotation. The medial clear space should be 4-5 mm or less, and it should be equal to the superior clear space which is between the talus and the distal tibia on the mortise view. If the medial clear space appears widened before surgery, then there is a deltoid injury. If the medial clear space does not appear widened, then make sure that you do not have a supination- external rotation type 4 injury. You may need to do stress view x-rays before surgery in order to prove that the deltoid ligament is or is not injured. The tiblofibular clear space should be less than 6 mm on the mortise view and it is the distance between the medial border of the fibula and the tibial Incisura notch. If the tiblofibular clear space is widened and the ankle mortise is unstable, this allows the talus to shift because the syndesmosis is unstable. 1 mm of talar shift will give a 42% decrease in tibiotalar contact area. This will cause future, accelerated arthritis. The tiblofibular overlap is about 10 mm in the AP view and you measure that from the medial border of the fibula. In the mortise view, the tibiofibular overlap should be more than 1 mm. Talo-Crural Angle I don’t use this and find not much value in this measurement except on exam questions! The lateral malleolus is longer than the medial malleolus, if the fibula is short, I can rely on two other x-ray measures that can help me: 1- Shenton’s Line: The subcondylar bone of the tibia and fibula should form a continuous line around the talus, so if the fibula is short then the spike of the fibula will too proximal. - If the fibula is long then the spike of the fibula will too distal. - Always look for the broken line from the lateral part of the articular surface of the talus to the distal fibula. 2- Dime Test - Look for the sprung mortise. - Look for the spike of the fibula to proximal. - Look for the broken Shenton’s Line. - Look for the Dime Test. - Look for medial clear space widening. - Get a lateral x-ray to see if there is a posterior malleolus fracture. - See if there is any talar subluxation. - See if there is any other associated Injuries from the talus and the calcaneous. The most important thing you will see on the lateral view x-ray of the ankle is the type of fracture: is it a Pronation - External rotation or Supination - External rotation Injury. - you will see that from the direction of the fracture. or Is the fracture comminuted? So you can say this is Pronation - Abduction Injury. Become a friend on facebook: http://www.facebook.com/drebraheim Follow me on twitter: https://twitter.com/#!/DrEbraheim_UTMC Donate to the University of Toledo Foundation Department of Orthopaedic Surgery Endowed Chair Fund: https://www.utfoundation.org/foundation/home/Give_Online.aspx?sig=29
Views: 17457 nabil ebraheim
Knee Pain Caused By Fibular Head :: WODdoc :: Project365 :: Episode 474
 
05:01
For more episodes and additional information about this post visit www.thewoddoc.com www.thewoddoc.com Subscribe Now.... New Episodes Daily Check WODdoc out on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, & SnapChat: https://www.facebook.com/thewoddoc
Views: 32103 WOD doc
Knee pain ,arthritis and Injured Cartilage  - Everything You Need To Know - Dr. Nabil Ebraheim, M.D.
 
05:56
Dr. Ebraheim’s educational animated video describing knee arthritis and knee pain . Causes of knee pain may be related to: •Sports •Trauma •Inflammation or arthritis •Osteoarthritis Cartilage is a tough and flexible connective tissue that gives shape, support and provides a cushion between bones in the joints. Unlike other connective tissue, cartilages do not have its own blood supply, instead, it is composed primarily of water, chondrocytes, collagen, and proteoglycans, which produce and maintain a structural matrix giving cartilage tissue its form and function. Proteoglycans are composed of numerous glycosaminoglycans attached to a core protein. The predominant glycosaminoglycans in cartilage are chondroitin sulfate and keratin sulfate. Within the cartilage matrix, there are numerous prototype and monomers attached by link protein to a molecule of hyaluronic acid. This is all woven with collagen to form an elastic and compressible structure. Normal articular cartilage also known as hyaline cartilage provides a smooth crystal clear gliding surface to aid in the motion of the joint. The structure of hyaline cartilage is divided into four layers; superficial, middle, deep and calcified layer with the calcified layer representing a transition from articular cartilage to bone. This cartilage is designed to achieve and maintain proper function over the majority of a person’s life. If the cartilage is subjected to excessive weight, overuse, improper alignment or injury, it begins to wear away leaving bone to rub on bone. Articular cartilage does not have the ability to heal itself, however, there are several treatment options available to aid in the repair of injured cartilage. The knee is the most common joint in the body with cartilage injury issues. The knee joint is composed of femur, tibia, and patella. There are two types of cartilage in the knee joint, the articular cartilage and the meniscus, which is a shock absorbing cartilage. There are also important ligaments within the knee joint, the anterior and the posterior cruciate ligaments. The goal of treating cartilage injury is to reduce pain and improve the function of the affected area. Anti-inflammatory medications are commonly used to combat-injured cartilage but they can potentially cause cardiovascular or gastrointestinal toxicity. Damaged cartilage can also be treated with a series of injections. Steroid injections such as cortisone are powerful anti-inflammatory drugs used in the treatment of osteoarthritis. Hyaluronic acid is a substance produced naturally in the body and is present within cartilage when isolated. Hyaluronic acid is a thick viscous solution that can be added to the natural hyaluronic acid of the knee joint. This solution uses purified Hyaluronic acid derived from either rooster combs or genetically engineered cells. Glucosamine is another option for treatment that can be injected directly into the joint. Glucosamine is a modified sugar that is formed by the human body and is used to form larger molecules involved in the formation and repair of cartilage. Other methods include gene therapy, platelet-rich plasma, growth factors, stem cells, drilling and debridement of cartilage may help with injured cartilage. Occasionally the cartilage is replaced, regrowth and implanted. When the cartilage is damaged, the choice is often simple as the patient will need a total knee replacement. Many different types of designs and materials are currently used in total knee replacement surgery. Nearly all consists of three components, a patellar component, which consists of durable plastic, a tibial component, made of a durable plastic cushion often held within a metal platform and the femoral component, which is usually made of highly polished metal. Total knee replacement is the most predictable option to treat severe arthritis of the knee joint. When the arthritis is minimal, almost all treatment methods will work, however, when the extent of arthritis is moderate, there are many different treatment options presented, but none of them are predictable. It is logical to pursue and recognize the efficacy of platelets and stem cells in cartilage regeneration, simply because it is better for the patient to be able to regenerate their own cartilages and for it to be replaced with an artificial joint.
Views: 1350321 nabil ebraheim
Ankle Fractures , Special Situations - Everything You Need To Know - Dr. Nabil Ebraheim
 
06:22
Dr. Ebraheim’s educational animated video describing fractures special situations, describing fractures of the ankle X – rays and ankle fracture classification, ankle fracture dislocation . It also describes ankle fracture treatment and ankle fracture surgery and ankle fracture recovery Ankle fractures and driving: Normal base line breaking time is about 9 weeks after surgery. For total hip is about 6 weeks. For long bone and periarticular fractures of the lower extremity, the breaking time is significantly reduced up to 6 weeks after initiation of weight bearing. Diabetes: in patients with diabetes, the first thing we have to check is if the patient have peripheral neuropathy, or Charcot- fracture. Diabetic patient has also high risk of infection, hardware failure, and delayed healing; the bone takes more time to heal. You have to do more percutaneous fixation, a lot of screws from the fibula to the tibia; it gives you more strength of the fixation because the screws are engaged into the tibia, so they are stronger than the small little screws in the fibula. Then delay weight bearing time and half more than the normal so usually you delay the weight bearing for about 3 months. Remember: surgery in displaced fracture in the ankle in diabetics is better than no surgery, but the complication rate is high. Ankle malunion: Usually the fibula is short and malreduced, and the syndesmosis is disrupted, usually you correct that by corrective osteotomy of the fibula to restore the fibular length, alignment, and rotation. You have to do anatomic reduction of the fibula and the Mortise, you have to do the plating of the fibula, and bone graft if needed, in addition to syndesmotic reconstruction. And you do ankle reconstruction to prevent arthritis by reducing the talus to the ankle mortise. Fibular fracture and unstable ankle mortise will allow the talar shift. 1mm shift of the talus will decrease the tibiotalar contact area by 42%. What are the fracture variants? - Maisonneuve fracture: it is a fracture of the proximal fibula with syndesmodic disruption, you can miss this fracture because you may think the patient has an ankle sprain, especially if the injury of the deltoid ligament is not apparent on the x-ray, you probably need to get long leg films to diagnose the fracture. So you need to fix the syndesmosis because in these patients the syndesmosis is disrupted, so you need to restore the fibular length and alignment before the insertion of the syndesmotic screws. Accurate reduction of the syndesmosis is needed. - Volkmann fracture: it is a fracture of the posterolateral aspect of the tibial attachment of the posterior inferior tibiofibular ligament. - Tillaux fracture: it is a salter type III fracture, it is a fracture of the tibial attachment of the anterior inferior tibiofibular ligament in the young. - Wagstaffe’s fracture: it is a fracture of the medial part of the fibula with that part being avulsed at the insertion of the anterior- inferior tibiofibular ligament. The anterior- inferior tibulofibular ligament remains intact. - Chaput’s Tubercle fracture: it is a fracture of the anterolateral part of the tibia in adults. It is similar to Tillaux fracture. Chaput’s tubercle fracture is different from Chaput’s fracture which is mid tarsal joint injury. So the ligament remains intact with: - Tillaux fracture - Wagstaffe’s fracture - Chaput’s Tubercle fracture The ligament is avulsed from the tibia in: - Tillaux fracture in the young - Chaput’s Tubercle fracture in adults The ligament is avulsed from the fibula in: - Wagstaffe’s fracture Bosworth fracture dislocation: rare fracture of the ankle, the fibula become trapped behind the tibia and become irreducible. The posterolateral ridge of the distal tibia will block reduction of the fibula. Become a friend on facebook: http://www.facebook.com/drebraheim Follow me on twitter: https://twitter.com/#!/DrEbraheim_UTMC Donate to the University of Toledo Foundation Department of Orthopaedic Surgery Endowed Chair Fund: https://www.utfoundation.org/foundation/home/Give_Online.aspx?sig=29
Views: 12214 nabil ebraheim
Ankle Fractures and the Syndesmosis - Everything You Need To Know - Dr. Nabil Ebraheim
 
10:35
Dr. Ebraheim’s educational animated video describing fractures of the ankle fractures - syndesmotic injury. Educational video describing fractures of the ankle X - rays. It describes ankle fracture classification, ankle fracture dislocation. It also describes ankle fracture treatment and ankle fracture surgery and ankle fracture recovery. how do we know if we have a syndesmotic injury? By getting the intra-operative stress exam, external rotation of the talus within the ankle mortise, this test determine if syndesmotic instability is present, you will do that test after fixation of the other fractures. The abduction external rotation of the talus will try to displace fibula from the incisura fibularis, the talus will move laterally and displaces the fibula. The ankle will show a valgus talar tilt or increase in the medial clear space. Before you do syndesmotic reduction and fixation, it is important to restore the length and rotation of the fibula. When instability is present, you have to do syndesmotic screw fixation. How do you know if there is instability? Always have a high index of suspicion. Syndesmotic fixation is more required when the fibular fracture is high and there is a deltoid ligament injury. Be skeptical about some of the statements such as fixation is not typically required when the fibular fracture is within 4.5 cm from the joint because that is not true. Just remember: Weber C is commonly associated with syndesmotic injury. So we get the stress views and look at certain measurements to determine if the syndesmosis is injured or not. At 1 cm above the joint we will measure the tibulofibular overlap which will be decreased if there is a syndesmotic injury. We also measure the tibiofibular clear space which will be more than 5 mm if there is a syndesmotic injury. Then we look at the medial clear space which will be increased, normally it should be less than 4 mm. Some people believe that the instability of the ankle appears more in the AP plain. The medial clear space can be increased preoperatively due to injury to the deltoid ligament. This is used to differentiate between supination – external rotation stage II and stage IV injuries. The medial clear space can be helpful intraoperatively after fixation of the fibula to diagnose syndesmotic injury on stress view radiographs. Syndesmosis fixation techniques: - You must restore the length and rotation of the fibula, which is not good enough by itself. - An Accurate reduction of the syndesmosis is required and direct inspection of the syndesmotic reduction is helpful, and this should be supported by x-rays. - Check for widening. - Check for the chenton’s line, dime sign, and that will be done after reduction and after using the reduction clamp. - This is the time to get an AP view and lateral view radiographs, and you assess before you place your screws. Try to use multiple techniques to check on the syndesmosis injury, one of them is the external rotation view the intraoperative one. The other one is the cotton test, get a hook and pull on the fibula and see the movement. The third one is direct inspection of the syndesmosis, make sure the crural fascia may be intact and covering a major syndesmotic injury. After that we go to the technique: 1- You dorsiflex the ankle. 2- Directly inspect and reduce the fibula. 3- Use reduction clamp. 4- Get x-rays to prove that the syndesmosis is reduced and then you put the screws, about 2-4 cm above the joint, with an angle of 20° to 30° posteriorly to anteriorly. Do not use lag screws and do not over compress the syndesmosis with the position of the talus in planter flexion, although a lot of people think it is not possible. Screws are really controversial ad no consensus about them. But there are a few important points about the screws: 1- The 4.5 mm are not used a lot nowadays. 2- When the widening is bad you are going to use more screws and more cortices, the more the better. 3- When you put the screws proximally and you don’t aim anteriorly you may miss the tibia. 4- Make sure when you go from cortex 1 to 2 and 3 in the tibia that you don’t miss cortex number 3 in the tibia. 5- Try to elevate the ankle a little bit so your hand will be allowed to do some anterior direction of the screws, so the screws will be angled a little bit. 6- Occasionally I cross the screws, so will be one direct straight forward and the other one will be oblique. 7- Screw removal: it’s controversial but you will not remove the screws before 3 months. What are the problems with the syndesmosis? • Missing the injury: Reading the x-ray, I use the 5 mm for reading the x-rays, whatever it is in the medial clear space or tibiofibular clear space as my mark, 5 mm is abnormal. • Malreduction of the syndesmosis: I want to make sure the fibula is anatomically reduced to the incisura before inserting the syndesmotic screws; I want to make sure and get an x-ray to check the talus both in the AP and lateral planes.
Views: 15661 nabil ebraheim
Big Toe Pain - Everything You Need To Know - Dr. Nabil Ebraheim
 
04:26
Dr. Ebraheim’s educational animated video describes painful conditions of the big toe. Big toe pain is fairly common, since the feet are constantly exposed to stress, overuse and injury from waling and running such as with sports activity. Arthritis When the big toes has limited movement, it is often associated with arthritis of the big toe. Degenerative arthritis of the big toe is painful stiffness and swelling of the first metatarsophalangeal joint. The patient may need fusion of the joint. Hallux Rigidus Arthritis of the big toe joint may be present with large dorsal bone spurs. This is referred to as hallux rigidus. The condition restricts dorsiflexion of the big toe with swelling. There will be some cartilage remaining within the joint space and there will be bone spurring around the joint. The condition is treated by dorsal cheilectomy. Remove 25% of the dorsal aspect of the tarsal head including the dorsal osteophytes. The procedure is contraindicated if the pain is located in the mid-range of joint motion (advanced arthritis need fusion). Hallux Valgus (Bunion Deformity) The condition is more common in women than in men. Once a bunion gets to be painful and shoe wear is uncomfortable, surgery may be needed. Gout The first metatarsal joint is the most common joint in the body to be affected by gout. Recurrent pain in the big toe occur from gout. Gout is caused by the build up of uric acid that looks like needles and the deposit of uric acid crystals inside the joint are negative. Gout may resemble infection. Sometimes there is white tophus or cloudy aspiration. Aspiration and analysis of the joint fluid is the best method for diagnosis. Xrays will show punched out periarticular lesions. Most people with high levels of uric acid do not have a gouty attack. Turf toe Turf toe is the common term used to describe an injury to the plantar plate and sesamoid complex of the MTP of the big toe. It is an injury to the joint at the base of the big toe caused by hyperextension of the big toe. Occurs in contact sports. The injury is seen more from playing on artificial turf since it is harder surface than grass with little “give” when force is placed on it. Xray may show fracture or displacement of the sesamoid. MRI may show disruption of the volar plate. Sesamoiditis There are two sesamoid bones, one tibular and one fibular. The sesamoiditis bones act like pulleys for the flexor tendons and are embedded into the tendons of the flexor hallucis brevis muscle. Sesamoiditis is generalized big toe pain at the bottom of the big toe. Sesamoids are important to the big toe region by absorbing weight-bearing pressure and reducing friction on the metatarsal head and they protect the flexor hallucis longus tendon as it glides between the two sesamoid bones. Any chronic sesamoid condition that is unresponsive to conservative treatment may require surgery. Become a friend on facebook: http://www.facebook.com/drebraheim Follow me on twitter: https://twitter.com/#!/DrEbraheim_UTMC
Views: 188071 nabil ebraheim
Signs your foot or ankle injury is serious
 
05:54
http://challenge.drdavidgeier.com/ds/906ca4c8 I want to help you! Please take a few seconds to share the biggest challenge or struggle you’re facing with your injury! Click here! http://www.drdavidgeier.com/signs-foot-ankle-injury-serious Click the link above for more information about serious foot and ankle injuries and other resources for your sports or exercise injury. Get The Serious Injury Checklist FREE! How can you know if your injury should get better in a few days or if it's more serious? This checklist can help you plan your next step to recover quickly and safely. http://www.sportsmedicinesimplified.com Please note: I don't respond to questions and requests for specific medical advice left in the comments to my videos. I receive too many to keep up (several hundred per week), and legally I can't offer specific medical advice to people who aren't my patients (see below). If you want to ask a question about a specific injury you have, leave it in the comments below, and I might answer it in an upcoming Ask Dr. Geier video. If you need more detailed information on your injury, go to my Resources page: https://www.drdavidgeier.com/resources/ The content of this YouTube Channel, https://www.youtube.com/user/drdavidgeier (“Channel”) is for INFORMATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY. The Channel may offer health, fitness, nutritional and other such information, but such information is intended for educational and informational purposes only. This content should not be used to self-diagnose or self-treat any health, medical, or physical condition. The content does not and is not intended to convey medical advice and does not constitute the practice of medicine. YOU SHOULD NOT RELY ON THIS INFORMATION AS A SUBSTITUTE FOR, NOR DOES IT REPLACE, PROFESSIONAL MEDICAL ADVICE, DIAGNOSIS, OR TREATMENT. You should consult with your healthcare professional before doing anything contained on this Channel. You agree that Dr. Geier is not responsible for any actions or inaction on your part based on the information that is presented on the Channel. Dr. David Geier Enterprises, LLC makes no representations about the accuracy or suitability of the content. USE OF THE CONTENT IS AT YOUR OWN RISK. Foot and ankle injuries are among the most common injuries active people suffer playing sports and exercising regularly. Fortunately, most of these injuries don’t require surgery. If you suffer an injury to one of your feet or an ankle, how can you know if it is serious? How can you tell if it’s worth seeing your doctor or an orthopaedic surgeon? This list is far from comprehensive, but here are three signs you have a foot or ankle injury that might require surgery or an extended absence from physical activity. Your pain is getting worse as you proceed through the workout. It might not be a big problem if you have soreness in your foot, or maybe your ankle, that stays at the same intensity through your exercise. If your pain keeps getting worse and worse as you keep going, it could be a sign that you have a more serious problem. You can’t walk without limping. Whether you suffer a traumatic event that started your foot or ankle pain, or if it developed over time with no specific injury, limping can be a bad sign. If you cannot walk with a normal gait and have to limp, it could be a sign that you should get it checked out. You really hurt the next day. If you exercise or play sports one day and find yourself to be miserable the next day, you might have a serious ankle or foot injury. It could just be pain, or you might have difficulty standing or putting weight on your foot. If you are that uncomfortable, you might consider seeing your doctor or an orthopaedic surgeon. Again, this list is not comprehensive, so it should not replace the advice of your doctor. If anything, I hope you would consider seeing your doctor or an orthopaedic surgeon soon after an injury if you have any of these complaints. Please remember, while I appreciate your questions, I cannot and will not offer specific medical advice by email, online, on my show, or in the comments at the end of these posts. My responses are meant to provide general medical information and education. Please consult your physician or health care provider for your specific medical concerns.
Views: 156981 Dr. David Geier
The worst Tibial Plateax Fracture
 
06:38
Information on cause of injury, x-rays, photos and a short video of a movement lesson soon after surgery. Introduction to 'Practitioner Heal Thyself ' series of video's on Rehabilitation Process.
Views: 4503 Kim Wise
Should you have your plate and screws removed after your ankle fracture heals?
 
04:59
http://challenge.drdavidgeier.com/ds/906ca4c8 I want to help you! Please take a few seconds to share the biggest challenge or struggle you’re facing with your injury! Click here! http://www.drdavidgeier.com/ask-dr-geier-ankle-fracture-hardware Click the link above for more information about plates and screws and other resources for your sports or exercise injury. Get The Serious Injury Checklist FREE! How can you know if your injury should get better in a few days or if it's more serious? This checklist can help you plan your next step to recover quickly and safely. http://www.sportsmedicinesimplified.com Please note: I don't respond to questions and requests for specific medical advice left in the comments to my videos. I receive too many to keep up (several hundred per week), and legally I can't offer specific medical advice to people who aren't my patients (see below). If you want to ask a question about a specific injury you have, leave it in the comments below, and I might answer it in an upcoming Ask Dr. Geier video. If you need more detailed information on your injury, go to my Resources page: https://www.drdavidgeier.com/resources/ The content of this YouTube Channel, https://www.youtube.com/user/drdavidgeier (“Channel”) is for INFORMATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY. The Channel may offer health, fitness, nutritional and other such information, but such information is intended for educational and informational purposes only. This content should not be used to self-diagnose or self-treat any health, medical, or physical condition. The content does not and is not intended to convey medical advice and does not constitute the practice of medicine. YOU SHOULD NOT RELY ON THIS INFORMATION AS A SUBSTITUTE FOR, NOR DOES IT REPLACE, PROFESSIONAL MEDICAL ADVICE, DIAGNOSIS, OR TREATMENT. You should consult with your healthcare professional before doing anything contained on this Channel. You agree that Dr. Geier is not responsible for any actions or inaction on your part based on the information that is presented on the Channel. Dr. David Geier Enterprises, LLC makes no representations about the accuracy or suitability of the content. USE OF THE CONTENT IS AT YOUR OWN RISK. Many of the surgeries we perform as orthopaedic surgeons involve placing implants, whether they are screws, plates, nails, or suture anchors. In this Ask Dr. Geier video, I discuss whether the hardware should be removed routinely after a very common orthopaedic surgery – surgery to fix an ankle fracture. Vikas writes: I broke my right ankle a year ago while playing football. Can I play football while there’s a plate still in? Or should I remove it and then play? After most surgeries, the hardware causes little trouble to the patient. Because people have little fat or muscle over the bones around the ankle, many people can feel the screws there with sports and exercise. If you do have discomfort, removing the screws or plate and screws can relieve that pain. It does take time to recover from the second surgery and return to play. There are situations where orthopaedic surgeons do remove the hardware. Complications such as infection or nonunion (the fracture doesn’t heal) that we would likely remove the hardware from the ankle. Please remember, while I appreciate your questions, I cannot and will not offer specific medical advice by email, online, on my show, or in the comments at the end of these posts. My responses are meant to provide general medical information and education. Please consult your physician or health care provider for your specific medical concerns.
Views: 34578 Dr. David Geier
Ankle  fracture / Fractures and its repair- Everything You Need To Know - Dr. Nabil Ebraheim
 
05:21
Dr. Ebraheim’s educational animated video describing the anatomy the injury the diagnosis and treatment of ankle fracture. Surgical tactics and strategy. The goal of surgery is to reduce the talus in an anatomical position under the tibia. Once the fractures have been fixed then stress views can be used to rule out a syndesmotic injury. The most effective method utilized to rule out the presence of syndesmotic injury is the use of stress view examinations. Rule out syndesmotic injury using intraoperative stress views which is the most relieable method. Check medial clear space which is the distance between the lateral border of the medial malleolus and the medial border of the talus, measured at the level of the talar dome. Check tibiofibular clear space. Direct inspection of the syndesmosis: excessive movement of the fibula with the use of a bone hook is another diagnostic method for syndesmotic injury. Excessive movement is abnormal. How do you do the intraoperative stress views? •Place ankle into neutral position. •Apply external rotation stress. •Get mortise view radiograph. Syndesmotic injury fixation •Reduction •Screw fixation
Views: 343856 nabil ebraheim
How to rehab an injured ankle
 
09:00
Everything you need to know about fixing football's most common injury How to get a scan: 0:29 How to test range of movement: 2:56 Functional assessment tests: 4:00 Rehab exercises: 5:30 SUBSCRIBE: http://fft.sm/6lZeN3 WEBSITE: http://fft.sm/XLBtaK Follow FourFourTwo Performance on: Instagram: http://fft.sm/TfnkQl Facebook: http://fft.sm/UXATZS Twitter: http://fft.sm/HcBNn9 Follow FourFourTwo on: Twitter: http://fft.sm/IVvx5C Facebook: http://fft.sm/8h27Gv Google+: http://fft.sm/tBDyjD Snapchat: FourFourTwoUK
Views: 218862 FourFourTwo
Self Ankle Massage ~ For Pain and Injury!
 
05:15
Here's a quick and effective self massage routine for your ankles! They can take a beating and are prone to rolling/twisting so so I hope this helps to ease some pain. Thanks for watching, sorry you have to look at my feet XD Follow me elsewhere: Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/OfficialHMM/ Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/hm_massage/?hl=en Music: www.incompetech.com Jim Yosef - Canary (NCS Release) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=52R3Xy82nFc Jim Yosef • https://soundcloud.com/jim-yosef • https://www.facebook.com/jimyosefmusic • https://www.youtube.com/c/JimYosef • https://twitter.com/jimyosef
Views: 54264 HM Massage
Fractures Of The Calcaneus - Everything You Need To Know - Dr. Nabil Ebraheim
 
12:26
Dr. Ebraheim’s educational animated video describes fracture of the calcaneus - heel bone. Fractures of the calcaneus could be open or closed. Open fractures can be a big problem. The primary fracture line is caused by an axial load injury. The primary fracture line goes from anterolateral to posteromedial. The primary fracture line divides the calcaneus into two main fragments. Superomedial fragment: •Constant fragment. •Also called sustentacular fragment Superolateral fragment •Tuberosity fragment Superomedial fragment includes the sustentaculum tali and it is stabilized to the talus by ligaments. Talus is attached to constant fragment. The flexor hallucis longus tendon lies underneath the sustentaculum and if screw placement to the sustentacular fragment is too long, this could affect the flexor hallucis longus tendon, causing fixed flexion of the big toe. Type I-- Nondisplaced/Non-operative treatment Type II--Two-part fracture of the posterior facet. Type III--Three-part fracture of the posterior facet. Sander’s type II & type III calcaneal fractures will benefit from surgery of reduction and fixation. Type III usually gets more arthritis because it has more fracture fragments and may end by fusion. Type VI •Highly comminuted •May require primary subtalar arthrodesis. Calcaneal avulsion fracture is an important topic. Calcaneal avulsion fractures need urgent reduction and internal fixation to prevent skin complications. Avulsion fracture of the calcaneus is an emergency. Do not wait, do emergency surgery. For joint depression fracture, wait for swelling to go down before surgery. Open reduction and internal fixation of the calcaneus is generally delayed for 1-2 weeks to allow for improvement of the soft tissue swelling, except with fractures of the posterior tuberosity (avulsion fracture) which can cause skin tenting and urgent reduction is recommended. Associated conditions •Spine fractures-10% •Compartment syndrome of the foot -10% : if neglected will lead to claw toe due to contracture of the intrinsic flexor muscles. •Calcaneocuboid joint fractures-60% •Bilateral fractures of calcaneus -10% •Peroneal tendon subluxation: may be detected on axial CT scan. May be seen as an avulsion fracture of the fibula on x-rays. Complication rate is high. Factors associated with poor outcome are: •Age (older than 50 years) •Smoking •Early surgery •History of a fall •Heavy manual labor •Obesity •Males •Bilateral injury •Workman’s compensation •Peripheral vascular disease. Men do worse with calcaneal fractures than women. Calcaneal fractures are better if the patient is a female. •Young females less than 40 years of age. •Patient has a simple fracture pattern. Man with calcaneal fracture: •Workman’s compensation •Heavy labor •0-degree Bohler angle: measured on lateral x-ray (Harris view and axial view) •Probably will need subtalar fusion. Bohler angle is formed by a line drawn from the highest point of the anterior process of the calcaneus to the highest point of the posterior facet and a line drawn tangential to the superior edge of the tuberosity. A decrease in this angle indicates the collapse of the posterior facet. Stress fracture of the calcaneus may be misdiagnosed as plantar fasciitis. •Occurs in female runners. •Swelling •Tenderness with medial and lateral compression of the hindfoot. •A compression test or squeeze test. Positive squeeze test could mean there is a stress fracture of the calcaneus. •Get an MRI if x-ray is negative •Will see a fracture in T1 as a linear streak or a band of low signal intensity in the posterior calcaneal tuberosity. •T2 will find an increased signal. Complications 1-Wound-related complications are the most common complications (20%). Occurs more in smokers, diabetics and in patients with open fractures. 2-Open fractures of the calcaneus--May lead to amputation & there is a high risk of infection. 3-Malunion of the calcaneus 4-Peroneal tendon irritation and impingement from the lateral wall. Surgery decreases the risk of post-traumatic arthritis. Tongue-type fracture may benefit from closed reduction and percutaneous fixation or open reduction and internal fixation. Joint depression type usually needs open reduction. Some surgeons advocate conservative treatment of the calcaneus. Subtalar distraction arthrodesis plus insertion of a bony block and rigid internal fixation The lateral calcaneal artery provides blood supply to the lateral flap associated with the calcaneal extensile approach. Be aware that the sural nerve is in the vicinity of the surgical area. The extensile approach has delayed wound healing in about 20% of cases. Become a friend on facebook: http://www.facebook.com/drebraheim Follow me on twitter: https://twitter.com/#!/DrEbraheim_UTMC
Views: 10092 nabil ebraheim
FIBULAR HEAD AND KNEE PAIN Part I
 
05:12
Jerry demonstrates treatment for knee pain that is actually related to the joint located below the knee. At one end of the fibula is the ankle joint, and the top end is just below the knee joint but is not part of the knee joint. On rare occasions, dysfunction in this joint is misdiagnosed and mis-treated as "knee joint injury". Dr. Jerry Hesch, MHS, PT, DPT lives in Aurora Colorado and additional information can be found at www.HeschInstitute.com
Views: 60989 Jerry Hesch
Best Ankle Rehabilitation Exercises For Those Recovering From Ankle Injury
 
11:34
Ankle Rehab As someone who has engaged in exercise and athletic activity for most of my life, I've put quite a few miles on my feet. I'm sure I'm not alone when saying that decades of pounding and abuse have added up to more than a few ankle injuries. The same mantra I'm given by doctors and physical therapists is 'make sure you continue to do your exercises.’ However, what normally happens is people give it a day or two, the ankle feels a bit better, so they don’t continue with their rehab. As we grow older, and the ankles don't recover as quickly as they used to, it’s important to realize now the absolute importance of actually performing those rehab exercises. Chronic discomfort and stiffness in the ankle can certainly be alleviated (nearly eliminated) by following a regular schedule of ankle strengthening activities. Not only will strength and balance return, but flexibility will also begin to improve. The crux is this: strengthening exercises for the ankle joints are not just for injury recovery. Make the exercise routine listed below a part of a regular schedule -- maybe every morning while watching the news, maybe every night before bed, maybe both! The point is to always make sure the ankles are at their strongest, their most balanced, and most flexible. Doing so will prevent most issues that lead to injury.
Views: 1049527 FlexWell
Knee Dislocations - Everything You Need To Know - Dr. Nabil Ebraheim
 
05:24
Educational video describing the types and treatment available for knee dislocations and possible vascular or nerve injuries. The knee joint allows for flexion and extension. These functions allow the body to perform activities like walking, running and sitting. Knee dislocations occur as a result of violent trauma. The femur and tibia are not articulating with each other. The bones of the knee are held together by strong ligaments. For a knee dislocation to occur, 3 out of 4 of these ligaments have to become ruptured. Types of knee joint dislocations: •Anterior •Posterior •Medial-lateral •Rotary: usually posterolateral. The medial femoral condyle can button-hole through the medial soft tissues resulting in a “dimple sign”. It is often irreducible. Posterior dislocation/ dashboard injury Most common mechanism of injury includes exaggerated hyperextension of the knee and dashboard injuries. Posteriorly directed force with the knee flexed in 90 degrees. The peroneal nerve is tethered at the fibular neck. The incidence of nerve injury ranges from 14% to 35%. Arterial injury •Vascular damage is most common in anterior and posterior dislocations in approximately 40% of the cases. Arterial damage in approximately 20-40% of all knee dislocations. Knee dislocation is associated with a high incidence of popliteal artery injury. •With an established popliteal artery and resultant ischemia, blood flow must be restored within 6 hours. •Posterior tibial and dorsalis pedis pulses should be carefully evaluated and compared to the other side in any patient with a knee dislocation. •Look for any evidence of ischemia, diminished blood flow, or compartment syndrome. •Urgent reduction of the knee dislocation is mandatory •Be aware of spontaneously reduced knee dislocations and its associated pathology. •Reevaluate circulation after reduction, if pulses are normal, serial follow-up up to 48 hours with clinical examination and non-invasive studies (ABI). If ABI is 0.9 or more, then the patient will not have an arterial injury. If pulses are abnormal or different, do arteriography. If no pulses then do an immediate exploration in the OR. Treatment •Arterial injury is treated with excision of the damaged segment and reanastmosis with a reverse saphenous vein graft and prophylactic fasciotomy. •Early surgery if ligament avulsion is present- important ligament to reconstruct is the PCL- if posterolateral corner disruption. •After reduction, the patient is placed into a knee immobilizer or external fixator. •Delayed elective reconstruction of the knee ligaments is usually done at a later date. •The PCL is an important ligament to reconstruct.
Views: 72723 nabil ebraheim
Ankle Fractures
 
03:03
An animated description of the anatomy and treatment of ankle fractures.
Views: 104103 sagaciousStudios
Fibula Head Mobilisation for ankle and knee pain
 
02:07
Mobilise the head of the fibula to improve ankle mobility and reduce lateral knee pain
Views: 27058 Andrew Tully
Ankle Pain, ankle ligaments sprain - Everything You Need To Know - Dr. Nabil Ebraheim
 
06:39
Dr. Ebraheim’s educational animated video describes conditions and treatment methods associated with pain of the ankle. High ankle sprain •A high ankle sprain is a sprain of the syndesmotic ligaments that connect the tibia and fibula at the ankle. •Diagnosis of syndesmotic injury is usually done by the use of external rotation stress view examination or CT scan. This patient may require surgery. Anterolateral impingment •Painful limitation of full range of ankle motion due to soft tissue or osseous (bony) pathology. •Soft tissue thickeneing commonly seen in athletes with prior trauama that extends into the ankle jint. •Arthroscopy of the ankle may be helpful . •Tibisl bone spur impinging on the talus can become a source of chronic ankle pain and limitation of ankle motion in athletes. Osseous (bony) spur on the anterior lip of tibia contacting the talus during dorsiflexion. The patient may need debridment of the spur. Ankle sprain •Pain that is anterior and around the fibula can usually be attributed to a ligament sprain. •Sprains result from the stretching and tearing (partial or complete) of small ligaments that can become damaged when the ankle is forced into an unnatural position. •Treatment includes immobilization, ice therapy, physical therapy and rarely surgery. •With ankle sprain, the patient will be able to walk, but it will be painful. With a fracture, the patient will be unable to walk. Pain that is posterior to the fibula can usually be attributed to an injury of the peroneal tendons. Lateral ankle pain •Patients with peroneal tendon problemes usually describe pain in the outer part of the ankle or just behind the lateral malleolus. •Problems mainly occus in the area where the tendons of the two muscles glide within a fibrous tunnel . Peroneal inflammation/ tendonitis •Tendons are subject to excessive repetitive forces causing pain and swelling. •Peroneal tendon subluxation •Usually occurs secondary to an ankle sprain with retinaculum injury. •Occurs with dorsiflexion and usually eversion of the ankle. Posterior anle pain Achilles tendonitis •Irritation and inflammation due to overuse. •Pain, swelling and tears within the tendon. •Achilles tendon can become prone to injury or rupture with age, lack of use or by aggressive exercises. •The Thompson test is performed to determine the presence of an Achilles tendon rupture. A positive result for the thompson’s test is determined by no movement of the ankle while squeezing of the calf muscles. Posterior ankle impingment •Os trigonum or large posterior process of talus (stieda syndrome) •Common among athletes such as ballet dancers. •May be seen in association with flexor hallucis longus tenosynovitis. Tarsal tunnel syndrome •Compression or squeezing on the posterior tibial nerve that produces symptoms of pain and numbness on the medial area of the ankle. •When conservative treatment methods fail, surgical treatment or tarsal tunnel release surgery may be needed. Posterior tibial tendon tears are one of the leading causes of failing arches (flatfoot) in adults. •Too many toes sign •Loss of medial arch height •Pain on the medial ankle with weight bearing Arthritis of the ankle joint •Commonly the result of a prior injury or inflammation to the ankle joint. •Can usually be easily diagnosed with an examination and x-ray. Osteochondral lesion of the talus •Arthroscopic debridment may be necessary. Please go to the following link and support the artist Johnny Widmer in his art contest - Sign to Facebook and click LIKE https://www.facebook.com/marlinmag/photos/a.10153261748858040.1073741838.134227843039/10153261754338040/?type=3&theater Thank you! https://www.facebook.com/JohnnyWidmerArt?fref=ts http://www.johnnywidmer.com/
Views: 561057 nabil ebraheim
How does a plate and screws help a broken bone heal?
 
05:32
http://challenge.drdavidgeier.com/ds/906ca4c8 I want to help you! Please take a few seconds to share the biggest challenge or struggle you’re facing with your injury! Click here! http://www.drdavidgeier.com/ask-dr-geier-plates-screws Click the link above for more information about a fracture and surgery to fix it and other resources for your sports or exercise injury. Get The Serious Injury Checklist FREE! How can you know if your injury should get better in a few days or if it's more serious? This checklist can help you plan your next step to recover quickly and safely. http://www.sportsmedicinesimplified.com Please note: I don't respond to questions and requests for specific medical advice left in the comments to my videos. I receive too many to keep up (several hundred per week), and legally I can't offer specific medical advice to people who aren't my patients (see below). If you want to ask a question about a specific injury you have, leave it in the comments below, and I might answer it in an upcoming Ask Dr. Geier video. If you need more detailed information on your injury, go to my Resources page: https://www.drdavidgeier.com/resources/ The content of this YouTube Channel, https://www.youtube.com/user/drdavidgeier (“Channel”) is for INFORMATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY. The Channel may offer health, fitness, nutritional and other such information, but such information is intended for educational and informational purposes only. This content should not be used to self-diagnose or self-treat any health, medical, or physical condition. The content does not and is not intended to convey medical advice and does not constitute the practice of medicine. YOU SHOULD NOT RELY ON THIS INFORMATION AS A SUBSTITUTE FOR, NOR DOES IT REPLACE, PROFESSIONAL MEDICAL ADVICE, DIAGNOSIS, OR TREATMENT. You should consult with your healthcare professional before doing anything contained on this Channel. You agree that Dr. Geier is not responsible for any actions or inaction on your part based on the information that is presented on the Channel. Dr. David Geier Enterprises, LLC makes no representations about the accuracy or suitability of the content. USE OF THE CONTENT IS AT YOUR OWN RISK. Putting a broken bone back in place and holding it with plates and screws is one of the most common types of surgery we do as orthopedic surgeons. Why do we use plates and screws, though? In this Ask Dr. Geier column, I discuss that question from a reader concerned about what the hardware does to the bone. Jorge asks: I don’t understand how drilling your bone to put a plate and screws helps a fracture heal. Are you not messing it up more by doing this? When we perform open reduction and internal fixation (the formal term for the surgery) of a fracture, we are essentially opening the skin to get down to the bone, putting it back in the proper position, and using hardware to keep it in that position. Yes, doing so requires drilling holes in the bone that the screws fill up. But we do that because often just putting the bone back in place won’t hold it in good position until your body heals the fracture. In this video, I explain why orthopedic surgeons use metal plates and screws instead of other options as well as how a fracture actually heals in the first place. You will better understand why some fractures need surgery and if and when plates and screws are removed. Please remember, while I appreciate your questions, I cannot and will not offer specific medical advice by email, online, on my show, or in the comments at the end of these posts. My responses are meant to provide general medical information and education. Please consult your physician or health care provider for your specific medical concerns.
Views: 32346 Dr. David Geier
Low Back & Hip Pain? Is it Nerve, Muscle, or Joint? How to Tell.
 
12:09
"Famous" Physical Therapists Bob Schrupp and Brad Heineck present different tests to tell if your low back and hip pain is being caused by nerve, muscle, or joint. Make sure to like us on FaceBook https://www.facebook.com/Physical-Therapy-317002538489676/timeline/ Check out the Products Bob and Brad LOVE on their Amazon Channel: https://www.amazon.com/shop/physicaltherapyvideo Follow us on Twitter https://twitter.com/PtFamous Our book “Three Simple Steps To Treat Back Pain” is available on Kindle http://www.amazon.com/Three-Simple-Steps-Treat-Back-ebook/dp/B00BPU4O5G/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1444092626&sr=8-1&keywords=3+simple+steps+to+treat+back+pain WANT TO HELP TRANSLATE OUR VIDEOS? We would so love the help. http://www.youtube.com/timedtext_cs_panel?tab=2&c=UCmTe0LsfEbpkDpgrxKAWbRA
Views: 377120 physicaltherapyvideo
Knee Pain: Symptoms, Treatment, and Prevention
 
04:33
What is this pain in my knee? Treatment and prevention tips for Runner's Knee, IT Band Syndrome, Arthritis of the Knee and Chondromalcia. Shop Now: http://goo.gl/u8RnLB Subscribe: http://www.youtube.com/user/footsmart
Views: 1293526 FootSmart
Amazing Chiropractor In India Fixing Ankle Sprains : Traditional Bone-Settler In Indian Village
 
09:33
संपर्क राकेश पहलवान , अजमेर, राजस्थान - 9414252695 # contact Rakesh pehalwan, ajmer -9414252695 , Rajasthan , निम्नलिखित बिमारियों का इलाज़ न्यूरोथेरेपी ट्रीटमेंट द्वारा - Back Pain, Knee Pain, Neck Pain, Cervical, Depression, Insomnia, Acidity, Gas, Calf Muscles Pain,एवं सर दर्द में तुरंत राहत के लिए | सेंटर पर अन्य सफल ट्रीटमेंट हें Constipation, Asthma, Arthritis, Slip Disc, Spondylitis, Skin Problems, Cold and Cough, Colitis, Dandruff, Diabetes, Epilepsy, Cancer, Mensuration Disorder, Paralysis, Piles, Sciatica, Seizures, Sinuosity, Varicose Veins. ================================================= Amazing Traditional bone setting method (Chiropractic ) is quite popular in India. Traditional bone setters (TBS) are one of the largest specialist groups practicing traditional medicine in Rajasthan, India. These are the indigenous specialists who have never been to any medical college but are able to treat and cure many orthopedic problems effectively. Many people in Rajasthan still find 'pehalwan ' an inexpensive and effective alternative to heal broken bones.These professionals are called as ‘Pehalwan ’ in local parlance and these healers have inherited such method of treatment from their forefathers. The technique neither uses X-Rays nor painkillers. ये वैध चोट-मोच फ्रैक्चर का देशी जडी-बूटी से इलाज़ करते हैं | Moreover he cured sciatic nerve pain of my wife.He uses twisting bone technique, heating, herbal techniques to relief patients from back pain and other nerves related problems . Amazing India: Ancient Indian Orthopedics Still Survives! | Art of Living ( hueseros )Traditional Bone-Settler In Indian Village Of Rajasthan : Chiropractor In India : Health & Treatment
Views: 1114115 SANJEEV KUMAR GUPTA
Tibial Plateau Fractures
 
12:00
More lectures on www.orthopaedicprinciples.com
Views: 80978 Lakshmisree T
Big Toe Pain  - Everything You Need To Know - Dr. Nabil Ebraheim
 
06:33
Dr. Ebraheim’s educational animated video describes painful conditions of the big toe. Big toe pain is fairly common, since the feet are constantly exposed to stress, overuse and injury from waling and running such as with sports activity. Arthritis When the big toes has limited movement, it is often associated with arthritis of the big toe. Degenerative arthritis of the big toe is painful stiffness and swelling of the first metatarsophalangeal joint. The patient may need fusion of the joint. Hallux Rigidus Arthritis of the big toe joint may be present with large dorsal bone spurs. This is referred to as hallux rigidus. The condition restricts dorsiflexion of the big toe with swelling. There will be some cartilage remaining within the joint space and there will be bone spurring around the joint. The condition is treated by dorsal cheilectomy. Remove 25% of the dorsal aspect of the tarsal head including the dorsal osteophytes. The procedure is contraindicated if the pain is located in the mid-range of joint motion (advanced arthritis need fusion). Hallux Valgus (Bunion Deformity) The condition is more common in women than in men. Once a bunion gets to be painful and shoe wear is uncomfortable, surgery may be needed. Gout The first metatarsal joint is the most common joint in the body to be affected by gout. Recurrent pain in the big toe occur from gout. Gout is caused by the build up of uric acid that looks like needles and the deposit of uric acid crystals inside the joint are negative. Gout may resemble infection. Sometimes there is white tophus or cloudy aspiration. Aspiration and analysis of the joint fluid is the best method for diagnosis. Xrays will show punched out periarticular lesions. Most people with high levels of uric acid do not have a gouty attack. Turf toe Turf toe is the common term used to describe an injury to the plantar plate and sesamoid complex of the MTP of the big toe. It is an injury to the joint at the base of the big toe caused by hyperextension of the big toe. Occurs in contact sports. The injury is seen more from playing on artificial turf since it is harder surface than grass with little “give” when force is placed on it. Xray may show fracture or displacement of the sesamoid. MRI may show disruption of the volar plate. Sesamoiditis There are two sesamoid bones, one tibular and one fibular. The sesamoiditis bones act like pulleys for the flexor tendons and are embedded into the tendons of the flexor hallucis brevis muscle. Sesamoiditis is generalized big toe pain at the bottom of the big toe. Sesamoids are important to the big toe region by absorbing weight-bearing pressure and reducing friction on the metatarsal head and they protect the flexor hallucis longus tendon as it glides between the two sesamoid bones. Any chronic sesamoid condition that is unresponsive to conservative treatment may require surgery. Become a friend on facebook: http://www.facebook.com/drebraheim Follow me on twitter: https://twitter.com/#!/DrEbraheim_UTMC
Views: 3893 nabil ebraheim
What you need to know about Popping Peroneal Syndrome, Ankle Popping / instability by Dr. Kevin Lam
 
05:09
www.NaplesPodiatrist.com talks about a common cause of ankle instability and popping about the ankle joint. Popping is really a tendon dislocating in this instance. Dr. Kevin Lam discussing and doing clinical tests to confirm diagnosis. An MRI will be helpful in these cases. For the 25 dislikers as of today 7.28.2015 what am I missing in here that you want to learn about? 239 430 3668
How to Regenerate Joints
 
16:46
How to Regenerate Joints Joints can regenerate IF you give them 3 things. 1) Proper nutrition/hydration (a dry joint is a malfunctioning joint) 2) Nerve Connection (if the brain can't get the right "perception" of a joint, then it won't move correctly) 3) Movement (PROPER movement of a joint keeps it nourished and strong) At http://bergmanchiropractic.com and http://Owners-Guide.com we strive to educate people on natural solutions to health. http://www.theArthritisReversalSystem.com is my online video course with 21 videos, 3 manuals and an online forum! http://SkypePackage.com for online consults. SUBSCRIBE at http://www.youtube.com/user/johnbchiro CALL TOLL FREE 1-855-712-0012 to get bonus materials not on YouTube or text your first name and email plus 89869 to 1-817-591-2905.
Views: 438818 Dr. John Bergman
Knee Pain, Meniscal Tear Diagnosis & MRI - Everything You Need To Know - Dr. Nabil Ebraheim
 
09:19
Dr. Ebraheim’s educational animated video describes knee pain and its indications. The patient will come to you with a history of a twisting injury and pain around the knee. The patient may give you a history of mechanical symptoms, such as: locking, clicking, or some swelling. You examine the patient and you’ll find there is joint line tenderness, maybe some effusion, and mcmurray’s test may be positive; Painful click is obtained at the knee is brought by flexion to extension with internal or external rotation. This maneuver also helps you to differentiate if the meniscus tear is on the medial or lateral side. Treatment: • NSAIDS • Physical Therapy • Injections • If there is no improvement, get an MRI. • You get the MRI early if patient has locked knee, means: you don’t have full extension of the knee, or if there is blood in the knee, so when you aspirate the knee because there is an effusion you get blood and you suspect ACL, you get an MRI. • In this situation you will suspect lateral meniscal tear. • It is usually a vertical tear of the posterior horn of the lateral meniscus and it is the commonly missed tear on an MRI. • Get x-ray first before you get an MRI to check if there is a fracture, arthritis, or any other problems in the knee. Why do you get an MRI? Because the clinical diagnosis accuracy is about 70%, and because there are other issues on the knee that can give you the same symptoms like the meniscal tear. These things may be intra articular or extra articular, and the symptoms will mimic meniscal tear, so we get the MRI, and it is the most sensitive test. You need to know these facts: • The lateral meniscus has twice the excursion of the medial meniscus, that’s why the medial meniscal tear is three times more often to occur than the lateral meniscus, so look for a tear of the medial meniscus because it is more common than the lateral meniscus. • Also the lateral meniscus will have most of the meniscal cyst. • On an MRI, how do you know which is the lateral meniscus? Check the position of the fibula, the lateral meniscus is on the same side as the fibula, also note that the fibula is posterior. • MRI is the best study to diagnose or to confirm meniscal pathology. • What do you see on the MRI? A normal meniscus will be dark; in the video we can see how we make these cuts in the MRI of the meniscus. The globular intrasubstance signal: • This increased signal intensity is within the meniscus, but it doesn’t extend to the surface of the meniscus in the grade I tear. • In grade II tear: you will have a linear area increased signal intensity, its inside the meniscus, and it does not go to the surface of the meniscus. • In grade III tear: you can see that the tear extends to the articular surface. What are the MRI signs of the meniscal tear? • Grade III signal, extend to the surface of the meniscus, among other things., example: may be horizontal, vertical, radial, oblique, complex, could be degenerative, displaced or missing a fragment, it can be in different forms and types, but there are a few important things in the MRI worth mentioning, this material frequently comes in the examinations, and they are: 1- The double PCL sign, the bucket handle tear of the medial meniscus, it is seen on the sagittal MRI, when a torn meniscal fragment is flipped and displaced into the notch, it’s a 100% specific for a flip bucket handle medial meniscal tear. 2- On the other hand bucket handle tear of the lateral meniscus where the posterior horn of the lateral meniscus flips anteriorly you will see the double anterior horn sign. What are the false positives in the MRI? 1- There’s a ligament called the transverse meniscal ligament, which attaches to the anterior horn of the lateral meniscus, and this one mimics the meniscal tear. 2- There is also a meniscofemoral ligament, attaches to the superior horn of the lateral meniscus, and this one also mimics meniscal tear. It is the humphrey or the wrisberg ligament. 3- Also if you have fluid tracking onto the sheath of the popliteal tendon, it will mimic posterior horn lateral meniscal tear. 4- Discoid meniscus: it is common in the lateral meniscus, patient will have a history of clicking or locking, or history of lack of full knee extension, patient will have more than 2 bowties, and the meniscus will extend beyond the half-way point of the condyle. 5- Parameniscal cysts: if you see it, you could have meniscal tear, especially with lateral meniscus horizontal tear, for this condition you will do partial meniscectomy and decompression of the cyst, the differential diagnosis will be: ganglion cyst and bursitis. 6- Baker’s cyst: you could have a combination of meniscal tear and baker’s cyst, it does not mean you have a meniscal tear,
Views: 31178 nabil ebraheim
Ankle Fracture , Stress View Radiographs - Everything You Need To Know - Dr. Nabil Ebraheim
 
05:53
Dr. Ebraheim’s educational animated video describing fractures of the ankle - external rotation stress view radiographs. Educational video describing fractures of the ankle X - rays. It describes ankle fracture classification, ankle fracture dislocation. It also describes ankle fracture treatment and ankle fracture surgery and ankle fracture recovery. You will do the stress view of the ankle before surgery to check the medial clear space. Check to see if the medial clear space is greater than 5mm which is a sign of a deltoid ligament injury. The injury is supination external rotation type IV and not type II, and this one will need surgery. The truth is, an isolated femoral fracture without talar displacement is a difficult problem, ans clinical examination is unreliable in predicting medial injury. Swelling, tenderness or ecchymosis is of limited value in predicting ankle instability. So we do 1 of 2 things, either: (both of them are more sensitive in predicting ankle instability): 1- external rotation stress radiograph: do external rotation of the foot with the ankle in dorsiflexion. Check the ankle in the mortise view. I personally like to inject the ankle with numbing medicine in order to make this less painful for the patient. The whole idea with abduction and external rotation of the talus is to attempt to displace the fibula from the incisura fibularis. When the talus moves laterally, freely because the deltoid is injured and it displaces the fibular fracture that will cause an increase in the medial clear space. 2- gravity stress test: support the leg with pillow and allow the ankle to rotate with gravity. Occasionally I get a CT scan of the syndesmosis and compare both sides. Magnify the view and measure it by the computer. So the most predictive factor of the medial side ankle injury is the presence of a high fibular fracture at or above the joint level. If you have a stress radiograph showing the medial clear space 4-5 mm or 1mm greater than the superior joint space. That means there is a deltoid ligament incompetence, & the talus is free, and it is probably a supination- external rotation injury type IV not II. Also look for any talar subluxation, it means that the ankle is unstable. The most important point in assessing ankle for surgery is the position of the talus within the mortise. The deltoid ligament is the primary stabilizer of the ankle point under physiological loading conditions. During surgery, you can use the stress views or cotton test. You want to make sure you don’t have syndesmotic injury, and you can use the criteria that decrease tibiofibular overlap or decrease in the medial clear space which should be less than 4mm. Or increase in the tibulofibular clear space more than 5 mm, which you will measure 1 cm above the joint. You do stress view after fixing the malleoli, just remember: you will need more syndesmotic screws in weber c, especially if the deltoid itself is injured. I have never seen an exam that doesn’t have something about assessing the stability by abduction, external rotation, stress view of the ankle, either before surgery or during surgery. Become a friend on facebook: http://www.facebook.com/drebraheim Follow me on twitter: https://twitter.com/#!/DrEbraheim_UTMC Donate to the University of Toledo Foundation Department of Orthopaedic Surgery Endowed Chair Fund: https://www.utfoundation.org/foundation/home/Give_Online.aspx?sig=29
Views: 6589 nabil ebraheim
Best Knee Rehab Exercises and Bends for Injury Recovery and Strengthening - Wellki
 
07:21
In today's video, I will be going through key knee exercises that will help restrengthen your knee if you have gone through a bad injury. Whether it's from a twisted knee or knee replacement, I've put together the 10 best rehab exercises for your knee joint recovery! Make sure you always consult your doctor or physician before performing any exercises. Especially after a recent injury. Make sure you subscribe and get all of the best diet, nutrition, fitness, workout and health tips! Let's get started! For each exercise: 2-5 repetitions 2-3 times per day Do the early recovery exercises as its own routine first. Then, once strength and mobility increases, add on the rehab maintenance exercises. Workout breakdown: BEST EARLY RECOVERY EXERCISES 0:23 Straight leg lifts While lying on your back, lift the leg up of the ground (roughly 6 inches), and hold for 5-10 seconds. Slowly return your leg back to the ground. 1:18 Knee Straightening Performing thigh squeezes is a good way to work the knee-extension muscles, which are very important for balance. While lying on your back, pull your toes towards your head, and gently try to push the back of your knee towards the ground, hold for 5-10 seconds. You have the option to use a towel underneath your knee, if that is more comfortable for you to do. The other option is to be seated, placing your heel on the ground. 2:03 Laying or Sitting Knee Bends The most important aspect of the knee is its ability to flex at the joint. To perform this exercise while laying, prop yourself up with a pillow, then slowly (and carefully) bend your knee by sliding your heel towards your body. Hold the position for 5-10 seconds. Another way to do this is to sit in a chair, and perform the exact same movement. While lying down, you have the option to use a towel underneath the thigh to assist in bending. You may also wrap the other leg in front of the affected leg, in order to assist in the knee bend. If closely following injury or surgery, make sure to not push it too far. 2:52 Sitting Knee Straightening The next level of knee extension exercises involves the use of gravity, and working your muscles against it. While seated in a chair, scoot back to keep the thigh on the chair. Comfortably and carefully straighten the affected leg towards full extension. Once again, don't force it too much, as it's important not to push it too far in the beginning rehabilitation stages BEST REHAB MAINTENANCE EXERCISES 3:30 Active Knee Bending It's called active knee bending because you are providing all of the work yourself, rather than shuffling your heel on the ground. Lay down on your stomach, and bring the heels towards your body, helping to bend the knee towards 90 degrees. Hold the position for 5-10 seconds. As with the early stage knee bends, you have the option to use your healthy leg to help bend the rehab leg. If possible at this point, and comfortable to do, you may bend past 90 degrees. Again, never push past your physical limits. 4:16 Step Up Lunges It's very important to start mimicking the movements you'll be making in real life, such as walking and climbing steps. Start this exercise by placing the affect leg up on a step, at a comfortable elevation (roughly 6-12 inches). Holding the position carefully by placing a hand on a support, slowly bend the knee down into a lunge. Complete 5-10 lunges. Only go down as far as is comfortable. If desired, hold for 5-10 seconds in the lunge position 5:07 Weight Transfer Movements These movements involve rocking your weight either side to side, or front to back. Begin by placing your feet apart at a comfortable distance, then shift your weight from side to side (or, front to back). Complete 5-10 reps per side, or front to back. Based on your comfort level, feel free to start lifting the feet up in the weight shifts. Advanced-level weight transfers include a slight hop, or jump 6:09 1/4 Squats This will help to regain balance, and begin to build strength around the knee joint. While standing upright with feet planted on the floor, slowly and comfortably bend at the knees, hanging on to a support if necessary. Only go down part ways into the squat, then return to the standing position. Option to hold at the bottom of the 1/4 squat for 5 seconds, then press back up to a standing position To get a detailed summary of these workouts, be sure to click on the link below! http://www.wellki.com/fitness/fitness-trends/4341-best-knee-exercises-for-injury-recovery P.S. - Make sure you share this video with your friends! -Jeff
KT Tape: Ankle Stability
 
04:49
This application can be used for a variety of ankle issues including ankle sprains, stretched ligaments, inflamed tendons, or general ankle weakness. The added support will give you the confidence and support during the rehabilitation phase of an injury as well as the stability and pain relief during activity. Ankle injuries can happen a number of different ways. They can occur during an acute injury, or a sudden rolling or twisting of the ankle. These types of injuries generally involve great pain and swelling. Typically acute injuries are inversion ankle sprains wherein the foot rolls to the inside while stepping on an uneven surface such as a curb, hole, or root. The first strip applied will help to keep the foot everted and decrease your tendency to suffer another sprain. The second and third strips provide excellent proprioceptive stability. Overuse or chronic ankle injuries occur overtime and are often the result of over training or training in poor conditions such as inappropriate footwear, uneven or dense surfaces, or simply too much too soon. These injuries are characterized by inflammation and are generally the result of other injuries. The stability provided by this application allows these inflamed tendons and ligaments to rest and avoid further injury. Ankle instability or weakness can lead to chronic sprains and tearing of ligaments and tendons and lead to other injuries. Unlike traditional ankle braces, KT Tape provides support that is very comfortable and allows you to have a greater range of motion. This application also helps to provide support without limiting your range of motion or decreasing your blood flow. For additional resources, please visit the KT Tape website at www.kttape.com.
Views: 3287930 KT Tape
Physical Therapy - Walking after Broken Leg
 
05:53
Physical Therapy - Walking after a Broken Leg. This is not medical advise. The cast is off, 50% weight on the leg is past and now I am allowed to put 100% weight on the broken leg, well broken ankle and leg really. It has been tough going, but lately every day sees improvements. Walking is now possible, for short distance, without crutches! This is nice. Not only can I walk a bit, I am also now driving again short distances. Now this is freedom! Learning to walk again is complicated by the fact that by foot get's still red and swollen when I stand up. The calf muscles are still quite tight and the toes, foot and ankle need more exercising. The knee on the broken leg is certainly weak and needs to get stronger as well. This said, it is all progressing nicely. Walking after a broken leg and surgery takes time, 4 months - but I am doing it again, or at least starting! I do start to feel the titanium plate or surgical implant and get some pain at the top of the plate in my leg (shin bone). Not sure if it is the muscle or the bone, but this only happens after heavy taxing of the leg. My Physical Therapist in South Holland is de Fysiotherapeut Pijnacker-Zuid: http://www.defysiotherapeutpz.nl/ in de Kroon Gezondheidscentrum http://www.gcdekroon.nl Physical Therapy for a Broken Leg: "Physical therapy following a leg fracture is important to reduce the incidence of long-term complications. For patients that have significant leg fractures, surgical correction or casting provides treatment but may still result in difficulties with walking or changes in gait long after the fracture has occurred. Early physical therapy, followed by continual rehabilitation is important to reduce the risk of problems with walking, such as unsteady gait, lack of endurance, stiffness and weakness. Some other types of complications that can develop with a lack of physical therapy include muscle atrophy, arthritis in the leg joints, delayed healing and infection." Source: http://www.livestrong.com/article/473644-acute-physical-therapy-for-a-broken-leg/ Physical Therapy after a Broken Leg - https://www.healthtap.com/topics/physical-therapy-after-broken-leg This is not medical advice. Get proper advise from your physical therapists or doctors, of course! Physical Therapy - Broken Leg - walking again!
Views: 138173 pijnacker01
How Long Does It Take To Heal From A Broken Ankle?
 
00:45
The long term goal of repairing a broken ankle is to decrease the chances arthritis in it can take up year after surgery for some patients regain full function. Ankle fractures (broken ankle) orthoinfo aaos. W long does it take a broken ankle to heal? Broken bones forum surgery how recover? Dailyhealthwire. It typically takes between six and 12 weeks to heal. The cast or boot is worn until the fracture fully healed, which usually takes two to 30 jan 2017 a broken (fractured) ankle needs be treated as soon possible. Leave your name and phone we will get to you as soon canphone lounging around on the couch waiting for broken ankle heal might seem like a dream. Crutches after ankle fracture aftercare medlineplus medical encyclopedia. This is typically done more often during the first 6 weeks if surgery not chosen explore best mobility devices to use broken ankle recovery. How to tell what do 2 may 201222 feb 2012 broken ankle experience part 4 of 5 includes topics such as when can you drive? long does it take get back normal? Muscles and tendons that worked just fine for the last 51 years all a sudden are totally this not include time soft tissues heal be rehabilitated. If your doctor didn't already tell you how long ankle needs to heal, note don't want do serious damage body while attempting hurry the main goal of surgery is get joint heal with a normal shape. Tips for recovering from a broken or dislocated ankle fracture (broken ankle) recovery time, treatment kneewalkercentral time and to surgery aofasbroken nhs choices. Recovery from a broken left ankle youtube. Ankle surgery how long does it take to recover? Youtube. It often takes patients as much a year before they know 22 feb 2014 if bone has been broken and needs to be repaired, more than just standard casting, we would ankle injury how long is the recovery? Treat ankle? How does it take heal quora. Treat a broken ankle? How long does it take to heal quora. Fractured my ankle 3 months ago but keeps swelling and is one step at a time diary of broken saga. 10 dec 2015 symptoms of a broken ankle include swelling, pain, bruising, bleeding, what do the bones and ligaments of the ankle look like (picture)? What severe fractures such as those requiring surgery will take more time to heal 23 oct 2014 i broke my ankle in 3 places just over 2 weeks ago, it was operated on only 2 hi, how long did it take your bones to heal with the screws and 9 jun 2015 after breaking her ankle, dilys morgan kept a diary over her twelve months of recovery 'i can't do anything spontaneously; Everything will involve my walking isn't perfect yet, but it's not far off and i feel at long last that 31 mar 2016 make the best health decisions by reading 7 tips for recovering from a broken or dislocated ankle at healthgrades, america's leading a fractured ankle can range from a simple break in one bone, which may not some minor ankle fractures do not require a splint or cast. A url? Q orthoinfo. Broken ankle experience part 4
Views: 467 Duck the Question
5 Steps to Ankle Pain Relief
 
03:12
Dr Saran's 5 Steps to Ankle Pain Relief Ankle is an intricate network of bones, ligaments, tendons and muscles. Strong enough to bear your body weight, your ankle can be prone to injury and pain. You may feel ankle pain on the inside or outside of your ankle or along the Achilles tendon, which connects the muscles in your lower leg to your heel bone. Although mild ankle pain often responds well to home treatments, it can take time to resolve. Severe ankle pain should be evaluated by your doctor, especially if it follows an injury. Here are 5 steps to pain relief. Keep training Dr Saranjeet Singh drsaranjeet@gmail.com
Views: 1105046 Saranjeet Singh
HIP PAIN ,COMMON CAUSES- Everything You Need To Know - Dr. Nabil Ebraheim
 
04:57
Dr. Ebraheim’s educational animated video describing conditions and treatment methods associated with pain of the hip. Pain can arise from structures that are within the hip joint or from structures surrounding the hip. The hip joint is a weight-bearing joint. The joint consists of two main parts: 1.Ball (femoral head) 2.Socket (acetabulum of the pelvis) Anterior hip pain (deep groin pain) 1-Arthritis of the hip Treatment •Conservative treatment: physical therapy, anti-inflammatory medication, injections •Surgical treatment: total hip replacement. 2-Labral tear •Diagnosis by MRI. •Conservative treatment: physical therapy, anti-inflammatory medication, injections •Surgical treatment: debridement or repair. 3-Stress fracture •Diagnosis usually by MRI. •Surgical treatment: usually fixation of the fracture is performed. Early diagnosis is important. 4-Avascular necrosis Treatment •Conservative cases: diagnosis by MRI. Early stages treatment includes decompression and stem cell injection. •Severe cases: usually diagnosed by X-ray. Severe cases treatment includes total hip replacement. •Intermediate cases: intermediate treatment includes vascularized fibular graft. Lateral hip pain Trochanteric bursitis Treatment •Conservative treatment:physical therapy, anti-inflammatory medication, injections. •Surgical treatment: excision of the bursa rarely utilized. Posterior hip pain Piriformis syndrome Conservative treatment •Physical therapy & stretching •Anti-inflammatory medication •Injections Surgical treatment in rare cases with release of the piriformis tendon. Far posterior pain (SI joint and lower spine conditions) •Injection of the SI joint is the only method to diagnose pain of the SI joint.
Views: 778961 nabil ebraheim
Swami Baba Ramdev Yoga Tips Arthritis (Part 1) | Knee Pain Cure
 
22:06
YOGA CURE FOR ARTHRITIS during winter. Watch Swami Ramdevs Yoga Tips on this website for 22 minutes on how to cure arthritis, joint pain, gout and osteoporosis. Swami recommends several exercises and medicines. Just click Play Video button above SUBSCRIBE to India TV Here: http://goo.gl/fcdXM0 Follow India TV on Social Media: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/indiatvnews Twitter: https://twitter.com/indiatvnews Download India TV Andriod App here: http://goo.gl/kOQvVB For More Videos Visit Here: http://www.indiatvnews.com/video/
Views: 1706837 IndiaTV
KT Tape: Full Knee Support
 
03:25
CHECK OUT THE NEW VERSION: http://bit.ly/xbCG1H. The knee is made up of joints that combine your upper leg (the femur) with the lower leg bones (tibia and fibula). The kneecap (patella) facilitates knee extension and tracks along the upper surface of this joint. The knee has two major ligaments - one on the outside of the knee and one on the inside. There are also three tendons in the inner part of the knee that help hold the knee in place. Crucial cartilage, nerves, and vascular structures also exist in the knee. There are many ways that the knee may become instable. If any tendons or ligaments are damaged, stretched, or inflamed, stability issues will arise. Overuse resulting in pain, trauma and injury, and degenerative conditions such as arthritis are common causes of stability problems. Treatment options include rest and ice as well as physical therapy or surgery in the case of tears or breaks. Bracing provides a temporary option to immobilize a serious injury, but in most cases is less than ideal when freedom of movement is needed to facilitate healing. This application should be used when pain or weakness of the knee become severe enough that activity is limited and the movement of the body is being changed to deal with pain. Injury, post-injury recovery, wincing pain, and poor physiology are all reason to use the full support application. For slight pain or weakness, or simply to add some confidence to your stride, use the light knee support application. The many applications of KT Tape for knee instability issues allow for support of the weakened anatomy, as well as provide positive signaling to the area for blood flow and lymphatic draining. The properties of the tape allow for this support to be provided while retaining range of motion. This allows for proper and promoted healing. As with most applications, the pain relief is very important as to not cause further injuries while compensating for existing pain.
Views: 1325514 KT Tape
Supramalleolar Osteotomy in Patients with Varus Ankle Osteoarthritis
 
08:27
Full video article: https://jbjs.org/reader.php?source=JBJS_Essential_Surgical_Techniques/1/3/e13/fulltext&id=29296&rsuite_id=858459#figures Supramalleolar osteotomies have been reported to be effective in the treatment of moderate primary and traumatic osteoarthritis of the ankle joint The osteotomy is designed to shift the weight-bearing axis to the lateral side of the ankle joint and unload the medial side of the joint. However, Tanaka et al. reported that the joint space cannot be restored to normal in ankles with greater than 10° of talar tilt. In our experience, a supramalleolar osteotomy has been effective clinically and radiographically in the treatment of moderate ankle osteoarthritis with a small amount of preoperative talar tilt and varus or normal heel alignment. The reconstruction occurs in five stages.
Views: 226 JBJSmedia
Ankle Fractures , Anatomical Considerations - Everything You Need To Know - Dr. Nabil Ebraheim
 
07:42
Dr. Ebraheim’s educational animated video describing fractures of the ankle, anatomical considerations, this video also explains fractures of the ankle X-rays. It describes ankle fracture classification, ankle fracture dislocation. It also describes ankle fracture treatment, ankle fracture surgery, and ankle fracture recovery. The talus is wider anteriorly than posteriorly. When the ankle dorsiflexes, the fibula rotates externally through the syndesmosis to accommodate the wider anterior part of the talus. The fibula is connected to the tibia by the interosseous membrane proximally, and then around the ankle you have ligaments: - The anterior inferior tibiofibular ligament - Posterior inferior tibiofibular ligament - Interosseous ligament These are the ligaments that are involved in the stability of the syndesmosis, responsible for stability of the ankle in external rotation, and they are different from the lateral collateral ligament. The lateral collateral ligaments that are involved in ankle sprains are: - Anterior talofibular ligament - Posterior talofibular ligament - Calcaneofibular ligament These are restrains to the inversion of the ankle and anterior translation of the talus. Then you have the medial malleolus with a groove for the posterior tibial tendon. So when posterior collicular fracture occurs, this tendon of the tibialis muscle supports the fracture so the fracture doesn’t displace. The medial malleolus has 2 collicular parts: • Anterior colliculus: is about 5mm longer than the posterior colliculus • Posterior colliculus The anterior and posterior collicular parts are separated by the intercollicular groove. The deltoid ligament supplies the medial support to the ankle. It’s composed of 2 parts: • The superficial deltoid: arises from the anterior colliculus. • Deep deltoid: arises from the posterior colliculus and intercollicular groove. It is an intra-articular ligament that can’t be repaired but we can debride it. When a fracture in the medial malleolus occurs, it can be one of these types: • The Supracollicular fracture: above both of the anterior and posterior colliculus, plus the deep deltoid ligament. • Anterior collicular fracture When fracture of the medial malleolus occurs, it can be one of these types: • The supracollicular fracture: above both the anterior and posterior colliculus • Anterior collicular fracture: involves anterior colliculus alone, or involves anterior colliculus plus the deep deltoid ligament. • Posterior colliculus fracture: needs an external rotation to see, it’s an AP external rotation view which is different from the posterior malleolus fracture which you get lateral external rotation view. If you have a vertical fracture of the medial malleolus which is supination and adduction, make sure you don’t have anterior medial marginal impaction. Make sure you put the screws parallel to the joint or use anti-glide plate. If you have an anterior intercollicular fracture, the fragment may be too small to fix with screws and you may want to use tension band technique. If it is posterior collicular, it’s probably stable, you may not need to fix. If it is supracollicular you probably need to use the screws that you use routinely, which is perpendicular to the fracture, and make sure they are not being placed inside the joint by getting an AP view of the ankle itself. The Nerves around the ankle: 1- The Saphenous nerve: is at risk of injury when you fix the medial malleolus, its usually superior and anterior to the tip of the medial malleolus. 2- The Superficial Peroneal nerve: it crosses from the lateral to the anterior compartment and this crossing may vary, and its vulnerable to injury during lateral plating of the fibula, it crosses the ankle anterior to the fibula and it is usually about 10 cm from the fibula tip, and it runs above the extensor retinaculum. 3- The Sural nerve: it’s vulnerable to injury distally, especially when you do posterolateral plating or posterior plating of the fibula, and the superior peroneal retinaculum also could be injured when you do posterior plating of the fibula. Become a friend on facebook: http://www.facebook.com/drebraheim Follow me on twitter: https://twitter.com/#!/DrEbraheim_UTMC Donate to the University of Toledo Foundation Department of Orthopaedic Surgery Endowed Chair Fund: https://www.utfoundation.org/foundation/home/Give_Online.aspx?sig=29
Views: 8044 nabil ebraheim
How Long Does It Take To Recover From A Broken Ankle?
 
00:45
How to tell what do 22 feb 2014 does ankle surgery involve? If a bone has been broken and needs be repaired, more than just standard casting, we would make an lounging around on the couch waiting for your heal might seem like dream. Broken ankle surgery, treatment and recovery. This does not include the time it take soft tissues to heal and be rehabilitated. A minor chip off the fibula (the lateral malleolus, or outside protrusion at ankle) may need casting fo 31 mar 2016 make best health decisions by reading 7 tips for recovering from a broken dislocated ankle healthgrades, america's leading 23 oct 2014 i broke my in 3 places just over 2 weeks ago, it was operated on only hi, how long did take your bones to heal with screws and 10 dec 2015 symptoms of include swelling, pain, bruising, bleeding, what do ligaments look like (picture)? What severe fractures such as those requiring surgery will more time 9 jun after breaking her ankle, dilys morgan kept diary twelve months recovery time, detailing huge impact break 'i can't anything spontaneously; Everything involve suppose it'll adjusting this heavy weight that goes everywhere me. How to treat a broken ankle? long does it take heal quora. The long term goal of repairing a broken ankle is to decrease the chances arthritis in it can take up year after surgery for some patients regain full function. This is typically done more often during the first 6 weeks if surgery not chosen 17 apr 2016 read patient information from medlineplus ankle fracture aftercarehow to take care of your cast or splint putting weight on too soon may mean bones do heal properly. Broken ankle surgery recovery time ekneewalker. Sprain symptoms and recovery time. Most people do not have problems with the plate and screws 10 jan 2013. Treat a broken ankle? How long does it take to heal quora ankle surgery, treatment and recovery. Sprained ankles, fractured what's the big deal? What can you do when you're not allowed to walk? . Kneewalkercentral broken ankle recovery time and tips to how long does it take a heal? Knee walker fibula needs patience fracture surgery aofas. Crutches after ankle fractures (broken ankle) orthoinfo aaos. Explore the best mobility devices to use during broken ankle recovery. Ankle surgery how long does it take to recover? Youtube. Crutches after iwalk free injury resource center broken ankle url? Q webcache. It may take longer for the involved ligaments and tendons to heal. The long christmas break 30 jan 2017 a broken (fractured) ankle needs to be treated as soon possible. Ankle fracture aftercare medlineplus medical encyclopedia. Googleusercontent search. As mentioned above, your doctor will most likely monitor the bone healing with repeated x rays. W long does it take a broken ankle to heal? Broken bones forum fracture (broken ankle) recovery time, treatment advice on and after an. The severity of the fracture will directly impact recovery time. You may breaking any one or more of those three bones c
Views: 163 Duck the Question
Dislocations Of The Talus - Everything You Need To Know - Dr. Nabil Ebraheim
 
02:56
Dr. Ebraheim’s educational animated video describes the Dislocation of the Talus Bone, which can be either Total or Subtalar, Subtalar could be Lateral or Medial. Dislocations of the talus can be a total dislocation or a subtalar dislocation. Types of dislocation Total dislocation of the talus which is not accompanied by a fracture is a very rare injury. Most of the injuries are open. Urgent care is necessary to avoid soft tissue complication. High risk of avascular necrosis of the talus, arthritis and soft tissue infection. Subtalar (the foot is lateral or medial ). Subtalar dislocation of the talus is a rare injury that results from excessive pronation. It involves simultaneous dislocation of the distal articulations of the talus at the talocalcaneal and talonavicular joints. Lateral subtalar dislocation/ tibialis posterior tendon entrapment It is often a result of high energy trauma. Worse long-term prognosis. Irreducible lateral dislocation due to interposed tibialis posterior tendon. Could be unstable and may sublux. May need CT scan to check for fractures. Medial subtalar dislocation 85% of the dislocations are medial and often result from low energy trauma. Irreducible medial dislocation due to interposed extensor digitorum brevis or extensor retinaculum. The direction of subtalar dislocation has important effects with respect to management and outcome. Complications of subtalar dislocation may include stiffness and subtalar arthritis. Treatment •Stable- closed reduction with 3-4 weeks of immobilization followed by physical therapy. •Unstable- after closed reduction internal fixation may be required. The anteromedial incision is used for medial dislocation. Lateral approach is used for lateral dislocation.
Views: 21685 nabil ebraheim
What Happens In Scenarios Of Tibial Plateau Fractures In Personal Injury Cases? | (219) 874-4878
 
03:19
http://www.michigancityinjurylaw.com Pejic & DiMartino, P.C. 1000 Washington Street Michigan City, IN 46360 (219) 874-4878 Personal injury defense attorney Guy DiMartino explains the scenario of tibial plateau fractures in car accident incidents in Michigan City, Indiana. For More Information about Personal Injury Please Visit http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Personal_injury For More Videos Of Attorney Guy S. DiMartino Please Subscribe https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCPQC0ZtxpmZQX_--zMyTrWw Related Videos https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eydwnXxJArs https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pTmwpZGpqRc https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rGKc9ZUxm08 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ubv2LqFhToM https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M8l1e3S0V3g
Views: 10609 Pejic & DiMartino, PC
Patella Fracture Repair
 
01:40
The OrthoIllustrated® animation for patella fracture repair is an educational tool to help patients better understand the diagnosis and treatment of this orthopedic condition.
Views: 93407 OrthoIllustrated
What Is The Tibial Plateau?
 
00:46
https://goo.gl/6U6t22 - Subscribe For more Videos ! For more Health Tips | Like | Comment | Share : ▷ CONNECT with us!! #HealthDiaries ► YOUTUBE - https://goo.gl/6U6t22 ► Facebook - https://goo.gl/uTP7zG ► Twitter - https://twitter.com/JuliyaLucy ► G+ Community - https://goo.gl/AfUDpR ► Google + - https://goo.gl/3rcniv ► Visit us - http://healthaware.in/ ► Blogger - https://juliyalucy.blogspot.in/ Watch for more Health Videos: ► How To Avoid Unwanted Pregnancy Naturally: https://goo.gl/hRy93e ► Period Hacks || How To Stop Your Periods Early: https://goo.gl/dSmFgi ► Cold and Flu Home Remedies: https://goo.gl/biPp8b ► Homemade Facial Packs: https://goo.gl/NwV5zj ► How To Lose Belly Fat In 7 Days: https://goo.gl/EHN879 ► Powerfull Foods for Control #Diabetes: https://goo.gl/9SdaLY ► Natural Hand Care Tips At Home That Work: https://goo.gl/YF3Exa ► How to Tighten #SaggingBreast: https://goo.gl/ENnb6b ► Natural Face Pack For Instant Glowing Skin: https://goo.gl/gvd5mM ► Get Rid of Stretch Marks Fast & Permanently: https://goo.gl/ZVYvQZ ► Eating Bananas with Black Spots: https://goo.gl/gXuri6 ► Drink this Juice every day to Cure #Thyroid in 3 Days: https://goo.gl/L3537H ► How Garlic Improves Sexual Stamina? https://goo.gl/GNcbYU ► Benefits of using Egg Shells: https://goo.gl/hAUyUS ► Home Remedies to Gain Weight Fast: https://goo.gl/jBVVQh ► Amazing Benefits of Olive Oil for Health: https://goo.gl/R3583v ► Rapid Relief of Chest Pain (Angina): https://goo.gl/idAFZR ► Home Remedies for Joint & Arthritis Pains Relief: https://goo.gl/jRbNkh ► SHOCKING TRICKs For #Diabetes Control: https://goo.gl/ATDDsV ► Doctors Are Shocked! #Diabetics: https://goo.gl/ZeQddJ ► Home Remedies for Gastric Troubles: https://goo.gl/72VR1b ► Juice for #Diabetics Type 2: https://goo.gl/3vDMqR --------- A tibial plateau fracture is a bone fracture or break in the continuity of the bone occurring in the proximal part of the tibia or shinbone called the tibial plateau; affecting the knee joint, stability and motion. Standard tibial plateau fractures involve cortical interruption or depression displacement the schatzker classification system for is widely used by orthopedic surgeons to assess initial injury, plan manage ment, and predict prognosis. Fifty one patients were treated by internal fixation, five combined and external fixation seven non operatively. 10 jul 2017 the tibial plateau is one of the most critical loadbearing areas in the human body; Fractures of the plateau affect knee alignment, stability, and motion 10 jul 2017 shown is an intra articular fracture of the medial condyle of the tibial plateau. Classification useful for 1) true fracture dislocations 2) patterns that do not fit into the schatzker classification (10lateral spiltlateral meniscus can be incarcerated in fracture2often seen young patients with high energy injuriestibial plateau joint depression 2 split ctlateral 31 may 2016 these fractures usually have associated soft tissue lesions will affect their treatment. Symptoms include pain, swelling, and a decreased ability to move the knee. Type iv, rim compression fracture. Watt suffered a tibial plateau fracture on sunday night, but if you don't know what that is you're not alone definition description. Schatzker classification of tibial plateau fractures use ct and schatzker rsna what is a fracture? Fansidedtibial everything you need to know dr. Complication may include injury to the artery or nerve, arthritis, and compartment syndrome. Nabil insufficiency fractures of the tibial plateau ajrmerriam webster medical dictionary. Type ii, entire condylar fracture. Although certain injury patterns may suggest a predominantly osseous to the knee, others significant soft tissue. Vail, denver tibial plateau fracture fractures of the proximal tibia (shinbone) orthoinfo aaos. The cause is fractures of the tibial plateau are considered quite serious as this upper surface bone contains structures which critical to knees functioning. 29 aug 2005 we assessed the functional outcome following fracture of the tibial plateau in 63 consecutive patients. Hence, fractures of the tibial plateau are often associated with injuries to anterior cruciate ligament, collateral ligaments (mcl or lcl), menisci and articular cartilage type i, coronal split fracture. Measurements of joint movement and muscle function were made using a the top surface tibia (the tibial plateau) is cancellous bone, which has 'honeycombed' appearance softer than thicker bone lower in. Shown is a schatzker type v fracture, with displaced and depressed medial tibial plateau fracture break of the upper part tibia (shinbone) that involves knee joint. The tibial plateau is one of the most critical load bearing areas in human body. Googleusercontent search. Treatment strategy fo
Views: 23 Ramona Ippolito
meniscus tear  , knee injury ,lateral meniscus    - Everything You Need To Know - Dr. Nabil Ebraheim
 
06:00
Dr. Ebraheim’s educational animated video describes knee pain examination of the meniscus. Knee pain diagnosis and knee pain treatment .It describes knee injury meniscus tear, meniscus pain, meniscus tear symptoms .it also describes meniscus tear tests and meniscus tear surgery and recovery. The meniscus is a cushion that distributes the load and reduces the stress being placed on the knee joint. These menisci protect the hyaline cartilage and prevent arthritis of the knee joint. There are two menisci; the lateral and the medial. We are going to discuss the lateral meniscus because the lateral meniscus has very special features that make it appealing for exam questions. The lateral meniscus is circular in shape. The anterior and posterior horns of the lateral meniscus are close together. The lateral meniscus covers about 70% of the lateral tibial plateau. The medial meniscus is “C” shaped and covers about 50% of the medial tibial plateau. The lateral meniscus has less peripheral soft tissue attachment, therefore it has twice the excursion of the medial meniscus (lateral meniscus is more mobile). The medial meniscus is less mobile and has three times the incidence of injury. The lateral meniscus is not injured as often as the medial meniscus. The lateral meniscus is involved with acute ACL tear. Tear of the ACL is usually peripheral and can be missed on MRI. In tibial plateau fractures, the lateral meniscal tear is more common than medial meniscal tears. The lateral meniscal tear is usually associated with a Schatzker Type II fracture, which is a split depression fracture. If you see a depression or widening greater than 5 mm in the tibial plateau, then it is probably associated with a lateral meniscal tear. The lateral meniscus has the hiatus for the popliteus tendon. The fibula identifies the lateral meniscus on MRI. The fibular is lateral and posterior. The lateral meniscus can be involved with multiple tear types. There are some special conditions that we need to be aware of: • Tear Type • Pathological condition of the meniscus. • Bucket handle tear of the lateral meniscus - Will give you the double anterior horn sign of the lateral meniscus on sagittal view MRI. • Meniscal Cyst - Usually occurs from a horizontal tear of the lateral meniscus. • Discoid meniscus - Occurs more on the lateral meniscus. • Meniscal repair on the lateral side can injury the peroneal nerve and popliteal vessels - The popliteal vessels are behind the posterior horn of the lateral meniscus. - Keep the approach and the dissection anterior to the biceps femoris tendon. • Tears of the peripheral 25% of the lateral meniscus (red zone) - This area is vascular and will heal if we repair/suture the meniscal tear. - There is a risk associated with suturing the peripheral tear. - The success rate associated with lateral meniscus repair increased with simultaneous ACL reconstruction. McMurray’s Test • Classic test that helps in the diagnosis of meniscal tears. • With tear of the lateral meniscus, you will have a positive McMurray’s test with internal rotation of the knee. Some structures may mimic a tear of the lateral meniscus (false positive MRI). • Meniscofemoral Ligament - Connects the meniscus into the PCL - Arises from the posterior horn of the lateral meniscus and it has two parts (Humphrey is anterior and the Wrisberg is posterior to the PCL). • Transverse Meniscofemoral Ligament - Connected to the lateral meniscus anteriorly • Fluid around the sheath of the popliteus tendon may mimic a tear Become a friend on facebook: http://www.facebook.com/drebraheim Follow me on twitter: https://twitter.com/#!/DrEbraheim_UTMC Donate to the University of Toledo Foundation Department of Orthopaedic Surgery Endowed Chair Fund: https://www.utfoundation.org/foundation/home/Give_Online.aspx?sig=29
Views: 27645 nabil ebraheim
Tibial Plateau Fracture with Metal Plate Fixation
 
05:59
Open reduction and internal fixation of tibial plateau fracture. Side plate and multiple screws used to hold fracture fragments together. Fracture lines run into the knee joint and, once healed, can develop into an abrasive opposing surface for the femoral condyles. This situation can eventually result in joint arthrosis and possible total knee replacement.
Views: 331403 trialfx .com
Ankle Bimalleolar Fracture Surgery by Dr.Mir Jawad Zar Khan Patient Testimonial
 
02:37
Elderly man with fracture of ankle bimalleolar fracture operated by Dr.Mir Jawad Zar Khan
Basic Anatomy Of The Patella - Everything You Need To Know - Dr. Nabil Ebraheim
 
05:38
Dr. Ebraheim's animated educational video describing the basic anatomy of the patella. The patella is the largest sesamoid bone in the body. The patellar tendon attaches the patella to the top of the tibia. The quadriceps muscle is attached superiorly to the patella. A small part of the quadriceps tendon then continues over the front of the patella to become the patellar tendon. The apex of the patella, which is the distal part is nonarticular. This area does give attachment to the patellar tendon. Several bursae is seen around the patella: 1-Suprapatellar 2-Prepatellar 3-Infrapatellar The thickness of the patella is about 2.5 cm. The cartilage thickness is about 5 mm in the middle portion (probably the largest thickness of cartilage in the body). The patella has two articular facets: a-Medial facet: •Proper •Odd: the odd facet articulates with deep flexion of the knee and it is located in the distal medial portion of the patella. b-Lateral facet: the lateral facet is longer wider, larger and broader. The two facets are separated by a vertical ridge. The medial facet is smaller (probably half the size of the lateral facet) The patellar tendon works with the quadriceps to straighten the leg. Diagram showing forces and constraints applied to the patella during its function.the patella increases the moment arm of the quadriceps by moving the muscle insertion away from the joint axis. This will increase the ability of the quadriceps muscle to produce torque around the knee joint. The patella is fully engaged at 40-45 of flexion and the forces at the patellofemoral joint is about 3-5 times the body weight. When the patient has a displaced patellar fracture or when the patellar tendon or the quadriceps tendon is torn, the patient will not be able to do active extension of the knee. When the patellar tendon is ruptured, the quadriceps tendon will pull the patella upwards. if the quadriceps tendon is ruptured, the patellar tendon will pull the patella downward. A complete tear of the quadriceps tendon or the patellar tendon can be identified clinically, however it may show on x-ray. MRI may be helpful. Rupture of the patella tendon causes patella Alta. Rupture of the quadriceps tendon causes patella Baja (patella infera). The most common problem after a patella fracture fixation is a painful hardware. The medial patellofemoral ligament inserts at the medial patella at the upper half and it is a restraint to lateral patellofemoral subluxation. Lateral dislocation or subluxation of the patella can be seen in the “sunrise” view. The specific bony bruise pattern may be seen on the medial aspect of the patella and on the lateral femoral condyle (seen on MRI). Follow me on twitter: https://twitter.com/#!/DrEbraheim_UTMC Donate to the University of Toledo Foundation Department of Orthopaedic Surgery Endowed Chair Fund: https://www.utfoundation.org/foundation/home/Give_Online.aspx?sig=29
Views: 13506 nabil ebraheim