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run for the pierogies
 
00:47
Runners and walkers gather to raise money for American Cancer Society Parma Area Relay for Life.
Просмотров: 38 News 5 Cleveland
Parma Run for the Pieogies
 
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Third annual Run for the Pierogies in Parma raises money for American Cancer Society and All Faiths Pantry.
Просмотров: 42 News 5 Cleveland
Joy of Christmas on Call-Back.mov
 
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Segment featuring "The Joy of Christmas" by Ric Valentine as seen on "Call-Back" (www.geoff-callback.blogspot.com) GREENBRIER RETIREMENT COMMUNITY RESIDENT AND COMPOSER FINALLY SEES DREAM PRODUCTION REALIZED ON CASSIDY STAGE TO BENEFIT CANCER SOCIETY Parma Heights, Ohio Communicares Greenbrier Senior Living Community will produce an original holiday musical on the Cox Stage at the Cassidy Theatre. The Joy of Christmas, written and composed by Greenbrier resident, Richard Valentine, 89, will have one performance only at 7:30 p.m. Sunday Dec. 7 at Cassidy Theatre, 6200 Pearl Rd. Parma Hts. Tickets are on sale now for a $5 donation and can be purchased at Greenbrier Retirement Center, 6457 Pearl Rd. in Parma Heights between the hours of 9:30 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. All proceeds will benefit the American Cancer Society. Valentine, a retired music teacher, who taught music in schools in Sandusky, Elyria, Avon Lake and others, began writing the book, music and lyrics to The Joy of Christmas 5 years ago. The musical is based on inspiration he had some years earlier while watching an awe-inspiring sunrise in Arizona. In 2007, Valentine moved to Greenbrier Retirement Community. He often entertains fellow residents by playing the piano and eventually he mentioned to an administrator that he had written an original Christmas musical. Greenbrier sponsors the Cassidy Theatres outreach performing group Cassidy On-Tour. Now the two organizations have partnered to bring Valentines composition to the stage this holiday season. The Joy of Christmas tells the story of a young boy and his world-weary parents who are not in the holiday spirit. Despite their reluctance, the boy convinces them to attend a holiday church service where the family is reminded of the joy, peace and love the holidays really can bring. Valentine wanted the production to benefit the American Cancer Society in honor of his late wife who lost her battle with the disease. Now, the composer himself battles cancer as well. The Joy of Christmas is sponsored by Communicares Greenbrier Senior Living Community and the Cassidy Theatre and stars
Просмотров: 275 Geoffrey Short
Cleveland Police surprise 80-year-old woman with dog
 
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A generous gesture brought new meaning to community policing on Sunday. ◂ WEWS NewsChannel5 is On Your Side with breaking news & weather updates -- NewsChannel 5 brings you the latest trusted news and information from Cleveland to Akron and throughout all of northeast Ohio. WEWS NewsChannel5 is the leading television station in Northeast Ohio. A proud affiliate of the ABC network, WEWS was the first television station in Ohio. iPhone: http://bit.ly/iOS-wews Android: http://bit.ly/wews-android
Просмотров: 4826 News 5 Cleveland
Cervical Cancer Misdiagnosis Lawyer Parma, OH 1-800-TEAM-LAW Ohio Lawsuit
 
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Cervical Cancer Misdiagnosis Lawyer Parma, OH 1-800-TEAM-LAW Ohio Lawsuit Call us toll free: (800) TEAM-LAW If you or a loved one now has advanced Cervical Cancer, despite having had regular pap smear testing, it is very likely that your pap smear slides were mistakenly read as negative or that your doctor accidentally overlooked the report or failed to react appropriately to the report of an abnormality. These mistakes may have deprived you of the benefits of early detection, including a higher likelihood of survival. Our team of skilled experts will fully investigate and uncover whether or not avoidable mistakes were made. Coming forward and holding healthcare practitioners accountable for their negligence is a brave and honorable thing to do. You could be saving many others from having to go through the same things that you are now going through. Call us today and schedule a free consultation, and learn more about how we can help. In these types of cases there's never any fee unless we recover money for you. We look forward to your call. Hiring an experienced Cervical Cancer attorney is your best chance to succeed.
Просмотров: 1 cervicalcancerLawyer
NC man who blamed cough syrup in wife's killing gets life sentence
 
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NC man who blamed cough syrup in wife's killing gets life sentence
Просмотров: 99 WSPA 7News
Rebecca E. Plude Memorial
 
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All music in this video was written and performed by Keldon Plude Copyright (c) 2011. Rebecca Elizabeth Plude né Kiehl of Davis, CA left this world on October 9, 2007 at Sutter Memorial Hospital after being diagnosed a year before with the rare autoimmune disease Scleroderma. She died of complications due to this and recently diagnosed cancer. Becky was born February 26, 1958 in Cleveland, Ohio. She spent her childhood and youth in Parma, Ohio. As a teen she served as lifeguard and participated in synchronized swimming at the Parma City pools. She also worked as a camp leader for mentally challenged children, instilling in her a lifelong desire to help other people. Her participation in junior high and high school choir would lead to a permanent love of music. She graduated with honors from Parma Senior High School in 1976. Becky attended Cleveland State University, graduating with honors with a degree in physical therapy in 1980. She paid her own way through college, working as many as three jobs at a time. After college, she lived in Michigan and had two children, Phillip Alex (b. 1985) and Keldon Robert (b. 1987) with her first husband. From 1980 through 1989 she held various director positions in acute care, physical therapy facilities and Community Mental Health programs. She moved back to Ohio with her children in 1989. As a single mother, she raised and home-schooled her two sons as a member of the Ohio Home-school Educators Network (OHEN). In addition, she attended seminars at the Institutes for the Achievement of Human Potential (IHAP) in order to optimize the life of her older son who was born with special needs. In 1990 she met her future second husband, Bryan Plude, at West Shore Unitarian Universalist Church in Rocky River, Ohio. Bryan and Rebecca were married on March 21, 1992 and continued to home-school Alex and Keldon. She returned to school to obtain a masters degree in education from Cleveland State University, also receiving a supplementary teaching certificate from the Association Montessori International (AMI). In 1996 Becky's third child, Miakoda Alexandra, was born in their loving home in Cleveland, Ohio. Shortly thereafter the family moved to California where Becky continued to work as a physical therapist. Even with three children, Becky still had much more love in her heart to give; She and Bryan decided to become foster parents. Jeanine Marie (b. 1999) became a Plude when she was adopted in 2001. Becky's love and devotion to all of her family members has been one of her most outstanding qualities throughout her entire life. Rebecca had a deep love for people and for justice, and from those came a strong passion for education, especially for children and young adults who typically fall through the cracks. She has spent much of her life working to realize her vision of an educational paradigm that truly teaches racial and environmental justice, health, and wholeness. A trained Montessori teacher, she worked hard for Yocha-de-he Prep School, carefully crafting an infant toddler program and a preschool program for Native American children. Her latest dream of a paradigm shift for education is a private preschool and elementary school slated to open in August of 2008 in West Sacramento. Having worked countless hours over the last year developing the plans for the Children's Village School, Rebecca most recently held focus groups and recruited and trained the Board of Directors. People were drawn to her the moment she began to weave her beautiful word pictures depicting her image of this school. Overflowing with the promise of her powerful vision, CVS will use Montessori pedagogy in a bilingual setting, offering an exploration of the world's cultures and faiths to children of all ability levels. The realization of this institution will be one of the many marks she leaves on the world. Rebecca's untimely death represents a significant loss for countless children and families who would have continued to benefit from her thirst for equality and justice and dedication to an educational paradigm of wholeness. Becky is survived by her husband Bryan Plude, children Alex, Keldon, Miakoda, and Jeanine, Mother Sandra Kiehl of Dayton, OH, Father Robert Kiehl Sr. of Fort Meyers, FL, siblings and their spouses Robert Jr. and Lyn, Thomas and Jeanette, Michael and Charlene, and Nancy Kiehl and Frank Wylie. The family has requested in lieu of flowers that donations be made to The Scleroderma Foundation at www.sclerodermafoundation.org.
Просмотров: 699 kplude
First Person: Even Zoo Animals Get Hot
 
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Keepers at the Columbus Zoo in Ohio talk about strategies for keeping animals under their care cool in withering summer heat. (July 8)
Просмотров: 1238 Associated Press
Proposed Ban on Tanning Beds Being Debated
 
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OHIO -- A new push to keep teens out of the tanning beds is now being debated by a Senate House Committee.The bill would ban teens under 18 from the tanning salons all together, something Jennifer Thomas agrees with.I have skin cancer in my family, and I know tanning causes skin cancer, she said.Thomas is grateful her mother is alive.She had melanoma on her face, and they had to remove all of the skin from her nose and they had to cut out a triangle from her forehead, she said, And flipped that down and sewed it to her nose and squeezed her forehead back together.No picture to show, but she says you can't even tell what happened.But the pain and grief her and her family went through was bad enough.It took a long time to heal, and it's not something I would want to go through, said Thomas.And she doesn't want anyone else to go through it either, which is why she supports Senate Bill 113.At this moment, all teens have to do is have a parent sign a waiver saying they can tan.If the bill would pass, teens under 18 would be banned from the tanning salons all together.Well the science has become more conclusive about the link between tanning beds and the link between cancer and melanoma, said Jeff Stephens, American Cancer Society.Lawmakers backing the bill, and those fighting for it say it's all about keeping teens alive.The pressure to be cute and tan for prom and those kind of event is really strong as a teenager so I think it's a really great idea, said Thomas.Senate Bill 113 got its second hearing in front of the committee Wednesday.It still has to pass the full House and Senate.
Просмотров: 66 WKEFandWRGT
Concrete Parma OH | 216.362.0900 | Commercial Concrete Contractor Parma Ohio
 
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http://21stcenturyconcrete.com Need concrete for your commercial project in the Parma Ohio area? We've got you covered! 21st Century Concrete provides concrete for municipal buildings, arenas, healthcare facilities, shopping centers, restaurants, manufacturing facilities, warehouses, parking garages and office buildings. Our services include pre-stressed, multilevel buildings, foundations, structural-engineered designs. We are ODOT certified and in addition to concrete work we now do electrical signalization and infrastructure projects. Our satisfied clients include: NASA, Cleveland Clinic, University Hospitals, ODOT, Cuyahoga Community College, Cleveland State University and RTA. No concrete job is too big or too small for 21st Century Concrete Construction Contractors. Call us at 216-362-0900 today.
Просмотров: 363 GreenGorillaVideo3
Justin Zabor & Kurt Zabor on ABC's News Channel 5, www.JustinZabor.com
 
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http://www.JustinZabor.com, Justin & Kurt Zabor of The Zabor Funeral Home in Cleveland/Parma OH, being interviewed about the "Men of Mortuaries" national breast cancer charity calendar.
Просмотров: 336 Justin Zabor
Teen kicking cancer pays it forward
 
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Beating cancer is tough enough for a teen. But Jane Finley of Bay Village also turned that diagnosis around to See The Possible for other kids with cancer. WKYC Channel 3's Dawn Kendrick brings us this "Good Stuff" update.
Просмотров: 65 WKYC Channel 3
Renato Zanelli - Esultate!
 
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Renato Zanelli (1892-1935) was a Chilean tenor who made his mark on the international opera scene during his all too brief career. Born Renato Zanelli Morales in Valparaiso to an Italian father and Chilean mother, he received his education in Europe after his family relocated to Italy in 1894. After returning to his birthplace at the age of 19, Zanelli began studying voice with tenor Angelo Querzé, with whom he worked for the next three years. His debut occurred in Santiago in 1916 as Valentin in Gounod’s Faust. It was as a baritone that Zanelli would build his resume for the next several years. After a successful season in Montevideo, Zanelli moved to New York and auditioned for the Metropolitan Opera. General Manager Giulio Gatti-Casazza offered the young singer a contract and Zanelli made his Met debut in 1919 as Amonasro in Aïda. Sadly, he made little impression (most of the reviews didn’t even bother to mention him) and was soon disenchanted with what the company had to offer him. Zanelli sang seventeen performances of five roles…Amonasro in Aïda, Don Carlo in La Forza del Destino, di Luna in Il Trovatore, Tonio in Pagliacci, Valentin in Faust and Dodon in Le Coq d’Or…as well as fourteen Sunday Night Concerts. After four seasons…bookended by Amonasros…Zanelli decided to call it quits at the Met. Before leaving New York, however, he sang one final baritone role. In a performance of excerpts from Otello in Central Park during the spring of 1923, Zanelli sang Iago to the Moor of Antonio Paoli. He then journeyed to Italy for further vocal study. Following a year and a half of intensive work with famed vocal coach Dante Lari (teacher of Giovanni Brevario and Gino Vanelli, among others) and conductor Fernando Tanara, Zanelli reemerged as a tenor. His first role in this new fach was Alfredo in La Traviata at the Politeama Giacosa in Naples in October of 1924. The following month, he took on a much more formidable task, Raoul in Gli Ugonotti at the Teatro San Carlo. In a very short time, Zanelli established himself as a dramatic tenor of the first rate with appearances in the major theaters of Venice, Milan, Florence, Bari, Naples, Turin, Parma, Bologna, Fiume, Lisbon, London, Cairo, Buenos Aires and Rio de Janeiro. His repertoire included the leads in La Fanciulla del West, Tosca, Il Trovatore, La Forza del Destino, Aïda, Andrea Chénier, Mefistofele, L’Africana, Carmen, Norma, Nerone, Pagliacci, Tristan und Isolde, Die Walküre, Lohengrin and his greatest achievement, Verdi’s Otello. In 1930, he created the title role in the world premiere of Pizzetti’s Lo Straniero at the Teatro dell’Opera in Rome and sang Otello to the Iago of his brother, Carlo Morelli (1897-1970) at the Teatro dal Verme that same year. In 1933, Zanelli returned to South America for a series of performances in Santiago and Buenos Aires. The tenor’s career was in full swing and he was at the peak of his vocal powers. Heralded as one of the greatest singing actors of his day, Zanelli seemed destined for a lengthy career. Sadly, things did not turn out that way… During much of 1933, Zanelli admitted to feeling poorly, but ignored his symptoms and pushed himself forward to meet the demands of his busy schedule. In October, he managed two performances of Otello in Santiago and a concert in Osorno. These would prove to be the tenor’s final public appearances. In the early part of 1934, Zanelli was back in the U.S. for a string of opera and concert appearances but was forced to cancel when he realized that he was simply too ill to perform. He had lost a tremendous amount of weight and was in such great pain that he finally sought the advice of doctors. Their diagnosis was grim; advanced cancer of the kidney. The tenor fought valiantly against the disease for much of the following year, but lost the battle in the end. Zanelli returned to Chile and died in Santiago on March 25, 1935, just a week shy of his 43rd birthday. Renato Zanelli made a lasting impression on the operatic world during his tragically brief life. In a career as a tenor that lasted only nine years, he established himself as a preeminent dramatic tenor and one of the leading Italianate Wagnerians of his generation. Unfortunately, his recorded legacy is pitifully lacking. Only a handful of recordings, made for Victor (as a baritone) and H.M.V. (as a tenor), exist to preserve the artistry of this great singing actor. These discs reveal a burly, masculine tenor, with an obvious baritonal foundation and rather muscular top notes. Zanelli uses his voice to great effect and his very theatrical interpretations give us some idea of his work on the opera stage. In this recording, Zanelli sings "Esultate!" from the beginning of Verdi's Otello. Also heard in thie performance are tenor Nello Palai as Cassio (and Roderigo), bass Guglielmo Masini as Montano, and baritone Enrico Roggio as Iago. This was recorded in Milan for H.M.V. on June 24, 1929.
Просмотров: 1213 Dead Tenors' Society
OEC, Parma Heights, Cleveland Heights, and Cleveland
 
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OEC-Diesel: In the Consent Decree between the United States, State of Ohio, and Premcor, Lima Refinery agreed to give the Ohio Environmental Council $50,000 for the installation of diesel retrofit technologies to reduce particle pollution and ozone precursors from municipal trucks and/or buses. This Consent Decree is a result of the US EPA and Ohio EPA identifying violations of certain provisions of the Clean Air Act, its implementing regulations, and the relevant provisions of the Ohio State Implementation Plan. Part of the settlement is this SEP. OEC has targeted the cities of Cleveland, Cleveland Heights, and Parma Heights which are all in Cuyahoga County which is failing air quality standards. These cities are in the process of purchasing diesel retrofits to reduce diesel emissions which have been linked to heart and lung disease, cancer, and preventable death.
Просмотров: 272 OECDiesel
Bodycam Shows Officer Give Ticket To Cancer Survivor
 
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A skin cancer survivor is baffled after she was ticketed for tinted windows, despite telling the officer the tint was for health reasons, and she said the city would not work with her on a solution. Parma Heights resident Shannon Coughlin said she was running an errand in Brooklyn on Sept. 14 when she was pulled over by a police officer. Bodycam footage shows the exchange between Coughlin and the officer. “The reason I stopped you [is] your windows are too dark,” the officer can be heard saying in the video. Later in the video, Coughlin explained why she had to have the tint installed – she used to have skin cancer. She showed us pictures from her past surgery. “I told him I had the tint put on there because I was diagnosed a couple years ago with skin cancer, and the doctor had said that I should take any precautions that I could,” she said. “I’m just trying to avoid getting another scar on my neck.” The officer told her she would need to keep a note from her doctor in her car while driving. She didn’t know. “[I was] shocked,” she said. “Beyond shocked.” He also told her if she had documentation, she could bring it to court. Later that month, her doctor wrote her a note that said, in part, the “tint is considered medically necessary.”
Просмотров: 1211 The Bodycam Channel
Patch Adams (6/10) Movie CLIP - To Be a Great Doctor (1998) HD
 
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Patch Adams movie clips: http://j.mp/1uuZQn3 BUY THE MOVIE: http://amzn.to/uhjb7y Don't miss the HOTTEST NEW TRAILERS: http://bit.ly/1u2y6pr CLIP DESCRIPTION: When Patch (Robin Williams) confronts Mitch (Philip Seymour Hoffman) about telling the Dean that he cheated, an argument ensues. FILM DESCRIPTION: The fact-based story of an unconventional physician who attempted to heal patients with laughter, based on his own book and mixing equal doses of scatological humor and pathos. Robin Williams stars as Hunter Adams, a troubled young man who commits himself to a mental institution in the late 1960s. His experiences there convince Adams to become a doctor, and he enrolls in medical school, where he is appalled at the cold, clinical professionalism that alienates patients from their caregivers. Determined to provide emotional and spiritual relief as well as medicine, Adams clowns around for his patients, getting to know them personally. Although his efforts seem to work wonders and the hospital nursing staff is grateful for the levity Adams provides, his methods alienate his uptight roommate Mitch (Philip Seymour Hoffman) as well as the staff and faculty of his school. Adams perseveres, however, even starting his own low-cost rural clinic called the Gesundheit Institute, and wooing a pretty fellow student, Carin (Monica Potter). Tragedy strikes, and Adams' career is put in jeopardy, forcing him to defend his style and philosophy before a board of jurists determined to bar him from practicing medicine. Patch Adams (1998) was produced by former M*A*S*H (1972-83) star Mike Farrell, who met the real-life Adams when the offbeat doctor served as an advisor to the actor's popular TV series. CREDITS: TM & © Universal (1998) Cast: Philip Seymour Hoffman, Robin Williams Director: Tom Shadyac Producers: Allegra Clegg, Alan B. Curtiss, Barry Kemp, Marvin Minoff, Devorah Moos-Hankin, Charles Newirth, Steve Oedekerk, Tom Shadyac, Marsha Garces Williams, Mike Farrell Screenwriters: Patch Adams, Maureen Mylander, Steve Oedekerk WHO ARE WE? The MOVIECLIPS channel is the largest collection of licensed movie clips on the web. Here you will find unforgettable moments, scenes and lines from all your favorite films. Made by movie fans, for movie fans. SUBSCRIBE TO OUR MOVIE CHANNELS: MOVIECLIPS: http://bit.ly/1u2yaWd ComingSoon: http://bit.ly/1DVpgtR Indie & Film Festivals: http://bit.ly/1wbkfYg Hero Central: http://bit.ly/1AMUZwv Extras: http://bit.ly/1u431fr Classic Trailers: http://bit.ly/1u43jDe Pop-Up Trailers: http://bit.ly/1z7EtZR Movie News: http://bit.ly/1C3Ncd2 Movie Games: http://bit.ly/1ygDV13 Fandango: http://bit.ly/1Bl79ye Fandango FrontRunners: http://bit.ly/1CggQfC HIT US UP: Facebook: http://on.fb.me/1y8M8ax Twitter: http://bit.ly/1ghOWmt Pinterest: http://bit.ly/14wL9De Tumblr: http://bit.ly/1vUwhH7
Просмотров: 617856 Movieclips
5am: Body found in Parma apartment
 
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A dead body found inside a Parma apartment Saturday night is now being investigated as a homicide.
Просмотров: 110 News 5 Cleveland
Poland's president visits Cleveland Clinic
 
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Poland's president visits Cleveland Clinic
Просмотров: 66 News 5 Cleveland
Johns Hopkins Pediatric Oncology - You're Beautiful
 
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Patients, families and staff at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center's Division of Pediatric Oncology sing along to the song, "What Makes You Beautiful" by British band One Direction. Learn about pediatric cancer: http://youtu.be/kEWwFqNhFHs Support childhood cancer research: http://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/kimmel_cancer_center/centers/pediatric_oncology/make_a_gift/
Просмотров: 441615 Johns Hopkins Kimmel
Donating Your Car to Charity: Car Expert Lauren Fix
 
01:34
It sounds so simple: donate your used vehicle or boat to charity, avoid the hassles associated with selling it and score a tax deduction at the same time. Before you hand one of your biggest assets over to anyone, be sure you're making the right moves: Avoid middlemen. Numerous for-profit intermediary organizations that advertise aggressively on TV, billboards and elsewhere, offering to help you donate your vehicle to charity. These organizations typically keep about 50 percent to 90 percent of the vehicle's value for themselves. Check directly with charities you admire and find out whether they accept car or boat donations. Find a worthy charity. If the charities you normally support aren't equipped to accept such donations, do some homework until you find a reputable charity. You can research charities track records online at the Better Business Bureau site and through Charity Navigator. Check the math. If you still feel compelled to use an intermediary organization, at least ask the organization how much of the car or boat's value will go to charity. If the organization simply gives charities flat fees, say, $100 for a used vehicle regardless of its value, or $2,000 a month, your donation may not be eligible for a tax deduction. Know the status of your recipient. In order for you to qualify for a deduction, the charity that gets your donation must be an IRS-approved 501(c)(3) organization. Do the delivery yourself. Once you've identified a worthy charity, recognize that it will have to pay someone to pick up your car or boat for you. To help the charity maximize the benefit of your donation, drop the car or boat off yourself. Transfer the vehicle with care. Eliminate all risks of running up parking tickets and other violations after you've said goodbye to your donated vehicle? You should formally re-title the vehicle to the charity, and report the transfer to your state's Department of Motor Vehicles or licensing. Never agree to leave the ownership space on the charity donation papers blank. Your estimate of the donation's value probably won't cut it. If your car or boat is worth more than $500, the IRS is going to want to see evidence of how much the charity got for it. You'll need to get a receipt from the charity revealing exactly how much money it made. Know when you can report the fair market value. Get a value from listings like Kelley Blue Book or similar sources. Keep a thorough paper trail. If your donation is worth more than $500, you'll have to attach IRS Form 8283 to your tax return. If it's worth more than $5,000, your documentation must include an outside appraisal. Be detail-oriented. This may be one of the biggest charitable donations you ever make. Details will make the difference on your tax returns. By taking the time to do this, you can make sure that the charity gets the most benefit and you get the biggest possible deduction. Courtesy of YNN/Time Warner Cable Aired: 6/21/2011
Просмотров: 3646 Car Coach Reports
Renato Zanelli - Prologue (Pagliacci)
 
05:26
Renato Zanelli (1892-1935) was a Chilean tenor who made his mark on the international opera scene during his all too brief career. Born Renato Zanelli Morales in Valparaiso to an Italian father and Chilean mother, he received his education in Europe after his family relocated to Italy in 1894. After returning to his birthplace at the age of 19, Zanelli began studying voice with tenor Angelo Querzé, with whom he worked for the next three years. His debut occurred in Santiago in 1916 as Valentin in Gounod’s Faust. It was as a baritone that Zanelli would build his resume for the next several years. After a successful season in Montevideo, Zanelli moved to New York and auditioned for the Metropolitan Opera. General Manager Giulio Gatti-Casazza offered the young singer a contract and Zanelli made his Met debut in 1919 as Amonasro in Aïda. Sadly, he made little impression (most of the reviews didn’t even bother to mention him) and was soon disenchanted with what the company had to offer him. Zanelli sang seventeen performances of five roles…Amonasro in Aïda, Don Carlo in La Forza del Destino, di Luna in Il Trovatore, Tonio in Pagliacci, Valentin in Faust and Dodon in Le Coq d’Or…as well as fourteen Sunday Night Concerts. After four seasons…bookended by Amonasros…Zanelli decided to call it quits at the Met. Before leaving New York, however, he sang one final baritone role. In a performance of excerpts from Otello in Central Park during the spring of 1923, Zanelli sang Jago to the Moor of Antonio Paoli. He then journeyed to Italy for further vocal study. Following a year and a half of intensive work with famed vocal coach Dante Lari (teacher of Giovanni Brevario and Gino Vanelli, among others) and conductor Fernando Tanara, Zanelli reemerged as a tenor. His first role in this new fach was Alfredo in La Traviata at the Politeama Giacosa in Naples in October of 1924. The following month, he took on a much more formidable task, Raoul in Gli Ugonotti at the Teatro San Carlo. In a very short time, Zanelli established himself as a dramatic tenor of the first rate with appearances in the major theaters of Venice, Milan, Florence, Bari, Naples, Turin, Parma, Bologna, Fiume, Lisbon, London, Cairo, Buenos Aires and Rio de Janeiro. His repertoire included the leads in La Fanciulla del West, Tosca, Il Trovatore, La Forza del Destino, Aïda, Andrea Chénier, Mefistofele, L’Africana, Carmen, Norma, Nerone, Pagliacci, Tristan und Isolde, Die Walküre, Lohengrin and his greatest achievement, Verdi’s Otello. In 1930, he created the title role in the world premiere of Pizzetti’s Lo Straniero at the Teatro dell’Opera in Rome and sang Otello to the Iago of his brother, Carlo Morelli (1897-1970) at the Teatro dal Verme that same year. In 1933, Zanelli returned to South America for a series of performances in Santiago and Buenos Aires. The tenor’s career was in full swing and he was at the peak of his vocal powers. Heralded as one of the greatest singing actors of his day, Zanelli seemed destined for a lengthy career. Sadly, things did not turn out that way… During much of 1933, Zanelli admitted to feeling poorly, but ignored his symptoms and pushed himself forward to meet the demands of his busy schedule. In October, he managed two performances of Otello in Santiago and a concert in Osorno. These would prove to be the tenor’s final public appearances. In the early part of 1934, Zanelli was back in the U.S. for a string of opera and concert appearances but was forced to cancel when he realized that he was simply too ill to perform. He had lost a tremendous amount of weight and was in such great pain that he finally sought the advice of doctors. Their diagnosis was grim; advanced cancer of the kidney. The tenor fought valiantly against the disease for much of the following year, but lost the battle in the end. Zanelli returned to Chile and died in Santiago on March 25, 1935, just a week shy of his 43rd birthday. Renato Zanelli made a lasting impression on the operatic world during his tragically brief life. In a career as a tenor that lasted only nine years, he established himself as a preeminent dramatic tenor and one of the leading Italianate Wagnerians of his generation. Unfortunately, his recorded legacy is pitifully lacking. Only a handful of recordings, made for Victor (as a baritone) and H.M.V. (as a tenor), exist to preserve the artistry of this great singing actor. These discs reveal a burly, masculine tenor, with an obvious baritonal foundation and rather muscular top notes. Zanelli uses his voice to great effect and his very theatrical interpretations give us some idea of his work on the opera stage. As a request, here is a fine representation of Zanelli as a baritone...the famous Prologue to Leoncavallo's Pagliacci. This recording was made on two separate discs for the Victor label in Camden, NJ on October 7, 1919.
Просмотров: 534 Dead Tenors' Society
Kids in America are Being Poisoned! Say no to GMOs!
 
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Idaho William is taking a stand against GMOs, and has a message for all kids, he also has a message for marketers and Monsanto. Say no to GMOs!
Просмотров: 1683 Idaho William
Dr. John Moore on Cosmetic Dental Associates San Antonio, TX Dental Practice
 
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Dr. John Moore of Cosmetic Dental Associates welcomes you to visit his dental practice and also showed all the latest dental equipment that they us to help patients relieve from dental problems or cosmetic dental problems within the day you visit the practice. Want more informational videos from top San Antonio, TX dentist Dr. John Moore? Checkout testimonial videos from our dental patients who has had Invisalign treatment, cosmetic dental procedure, dental implants, veneers and many more. Visit our YouTube channel at https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCfWmBnLUO6dksEfLSeN3PfA Like us on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/33smile Follow us on Twitter: http://twitter.com/33_smile Pin, save and share photos with us on Pinterest https://www.pinterest.com/33smilecom/ Instagram https://www.instagram.com/drjamsmiles/ Snapchat us on https://www.snapchat.com/add/drjamsmilesf Dr. John Moore, DDS San Antonio, TX Cosmetic Dentist 5837 Babcock Road San Antonio, TX 78240 (210) 951-4444
Просмотров: 5064 Cosmetic Dental Associates
Lakewood Ohio Fire Department apartment fire on Hopkins Avenue
 
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Apartment fire on Hopkins Avenue Lakewood Ohio
Просмотров: 83 William Pearce
Renato Zanelli - O Primavera
 
02:26
Renato Zanelli (1892-1935) was a Chilean tenor who made his mark on the international opera scene during his all too brief career. Born Renato Zanelli Morales in Valparaiso to an Italian father and Chilean mother, he received his education in Europe after his family relocated to Italy in 1894. After returning to his birthplace at the age of 19, Zanelli began studying voice with tenor Angelo Querzé, with whom he worked for the next three years. His debut occurred in Santiago in 1916 as Valentin in Gounod’s Faust. It was as a baritone that Zanelli would build his resume for the next several years. After a successful season in Montevideo, Zanelli moved to New York and auditioned for the Metropolitan Opera. General Manager Giulio Gatti-Casazza offered the young singer a contract and Zanelli made his Met debut in 1919 as Amonasro in Aïda. Sadly, he made little impression (most of the reviews didn’t even bother to mention him) and was soon disenchanted with what the company had to offer him. Zanelli sang seventeen performances of five roles…Amonasro in Aïda, Don Carlo in La Forza del Destino, di Luna in Il Trovatore, Tonio in Pagliacci, Valentin in Faust and Dodon in Le Coq d’Or…as well as fourteen Sunday Night Concerts. After four seasons…bookended by Amonasros…Zanelli decided to call it quits at the Met. Before leaving New York, however, he sang one final baritone role. In a performance of excerpts from Otello in Central Park during the spring of 1923, Zanelli sang Jago to the Moor of Antonio Paoli. He then journeyed to Italy for further vocal study. Following a year and a half of intensive work with famed vocal coach Dante Lari (teacher of Giovanni Brevario and Gino Vanelli, among others) and conductor Fernando Tanara, Zanelli reemerged as a tenor. His first role in this new fach was Alfredo in La Traviata at the Politeama Giacosa in Naples in October of 1924. The following month, he took on a much more formidable task, Raoul in Gli Ugonotti at the Teatro San Carlo. In a very short time, Zanelli established himself as a dramatic tenor of the first rate with appearances in the major theaters of Venice, Milan, Florence, Bari, Naples, Turin, Parma, Bologna, Fiume, Lisbon, London, Cairo, Buenos Aires and Rio de Janeiro. His repertoire included the leads in La Fanciulla del West, Tosca, Il Trovatore, La Forza del Destino, Aïda, Andrea Chénier, Mefistofele, L’Africana, Carmen, Norma, Nerone, Pagliacci, Tristan und Isolde, Die Walküre, Lohengrin and his greatest achievement, Verdi’s Otello. In 1930, he created the title role in the world premiere of Pizzetti’s Lo Straniero at the Teatro dell’Opera in Rome and sang Otello to the Iago of his brother, Carlo Morelli (1897-1970) at the Teatro dal Verme that same year. In 1933, Zanelli returned to South America for a series of performances in Santiago and Buenos Aires. The tenor’s career was in full swing and he was at the peak of his vocal powers. Heralded as one of the greatest singing actors of his day, Zanelli seemed destined for a lengthy career. Sadly, things did not turn out that way… During much of 1933, Zanelli admitted to feeling poorly, but ignored his symptoms and pushed himself forward to meet the demands of his busy schedule. In October, he managed two performances of Otello in Santiago and a concert in Osorno. These would prove to be the tenor’s final public appearances. In the early part of 1934, Zanelli was back in the U.S. for a string of opera and concert appearances but was forced to cancel when he realized that he was simply too ill to perform. He had lost a tremendous amount of weight and was in such great pain that he finally sought the advice of doctors. Their diagnosis was grim; advanced cancer of the kidney. The tenor fought valiantly against the disease for much of the following year, but lost the battle in the end. Zanelli returned to Chile and died in Santiago on March 25, 1935, just a week shy of his 43rd birthday. Renato Zanelli made a lasting impression on the operatic world during his tragically brief life. In a career as a tenor that lasted only nine years, he established himself as a preeminent dramatic tenor and one of the leading Italianate Wagnerians of his generation. Unfortunately, his recorded legacy is pitifully lacking. Only a handful of recordings, made for Victor (as a baritone) and H.M.V. (as a tenor), exist to preserve the artistry of this great singing actor. These discs reveal a burly, masculine tenor, with an obvious baritonal foundation and rather muscular top notes. Zanelli uses his voice to great effect and his very theatrical interpretations give us some idea of his work on the opera stage. In this recording, Zanelli sings Tirindelli's delightful song, "O Primavera". This recording, dating from Zanelli's baritone days, was made for the Victor label in Camden, New Jersey on November 29, 1920.
Просмотров: 367 Dead Tenors' Society
Naloxone: experience and perspectives
 
05:52
The use of naloxone as a life-saving treatment for overdose is critical in reducing the harms associated with prescription and illicit opioids. Penington Institute, with the support of the Stepping Up Consortium, has developed two videos to educate needle and syringe programs; alcohol and drug treatment services; opioid pharmacotherapy program providers; primary health care providers and those at risk of opioid overdose on a range of topics, including: • How naloxone works • Recognising the signs of overdose • How to respond to an overdose • How and where to access naloxone • Safe administration of naloxone • The COPE program and accessing support Naloxone: experience and perspectives – is for frontline workers and people who are at risk of overdose. In the video, police, ambulance officers, doctors and health workers speak about the lifesaving capacity of naloxone, and their support for its use in a community setting.
Просмотров: 1016 Penington Institute
Stronger | Seattle Childrens Hospital
 
03:35
http://www.indiegogo.com/rumblecancer?c=home&a=774465 The hemoncology floor of Seattle Children's Hospital performs Kelly Clarkson's song "Stronger" NEW! Check out a quick behind the scenes clip of how the video was made http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b4w1beZg8mM
Просмотров: 4155957 Christopher R
Renato Zanelli - Dio!  Mi potevi scagliar
 
04:12
Renato Zanelli (1892-1935) was a Chilean tenor who made his mark on the international opera scene during his all too brief career. Born Renato Zanelli Morales in Valparaiso to an Italian father and Chilean mother, he received his education in Europe after his family relocated to Italy in 1894. After returning to his birthplace at the age of 19, Zanelli began studying voice with tenor Angelo Querzé, with whom he worked for the next three years. His debut occurred in Santiago in 1916 as Valentin in Gounod’s Faust. It was as a baritone that Zanelli would build his resume for the next several years. After a successful season in Montevideo, Zanelli moved to New York and auditioned for the Metropolitan Opera. General Manager Giulio Gatti-Casazza offered the young singer a contract and Zanelli made his Met debut in 1919 as Amonasro in Aïda. Sadly, he made little impression (most of the reviews didn’t even bother to mention him) and was soon disenchanted with what the company had to offer him. Zanelli sang seventeen performances of five roles…Amonasro in Aïda, Don Carlo in La Forza del Destino, di Luna in Il Trovatore, Tonio in Pagliacci, Valentin in Faust and Dodon in Le Coq d’Or…as well as fourteen Sunday Night Concerts. After four seasons…bookended by Amonasros…Zanelli decided to call it quits at the Met. Before leaving New York, however, he sang one final baritone role. In a performance of excerpts from Otello in Central Park during the spring of 1923, Zanelli sang Iago to the Moor of Antonio Paoli. He then journeyed to Italy for further vocal study. Following a year and a half of intensive work with famed vocal coach Dante Lari (teacher of Giovanni Brevario and Gino Vanelli, among others) and conductor Fernando Tanara, Zanelli reemerged as a tenor. His first role in this new fach was Alfredo in La Traviata at the Politeama Giacosa in Naples in October of 1924. The following month, he took on a much more formidable task, Raoul in Gli Ugonotti at the Teatro San Carlo. In a very short time, Zanelli established himself as a dramatic tenor of the first rate with appearances in the major theaters of Venice, Milan, Florence, Bari, Naples, Turin, Parma, Bologna, Fiume, Lisbon, London, Cairo, Buenos Aires and Rio de Janeiro. His repertoire included the leads in La Fanciulla del West, Tosca, Il Trovatore, La Forza del Destino, Aïda, Andrea Chénier, Mefistofele, L’Africana, Carmen, Norma, Nerone, Pagliacci, Tristan und Isolde, Die Walküre, Lohengrin and his greatest achievement, Verdi’s Otello. In 1930, he created the title role in the world premiere of Pizzetti’s Lo Straniero at the Teatro dell’Opera in Rome and sang Otello to the Iago of his brother, Carlo Morelli (1897-1970) at the Teatro dal Verme that same year. In 1933, Zanelli returned to South America for a series of performances in Santiago and Buenos Aires. The tenor’s career was in full swing and he was at the peak of his vocal powers. Heralded as one of the greatest singing actors of his day, Zanelli seemed destined for a lengthy career. Sadly, things did not turn out that way… During much of 1933, Zanelli admitted to feeling poorly, but ignored his symptoms and pushed himself forward to meet the demands of his busy schedule. In October, he managed two performances of Otello in Santiago and a concert in Osorno. These would prove to be the tenor’s final public appearances. In the early part of 1934, Zanelli was back in the U.S. for a string of opera and concert appearances but was forced to cancel when he realized that he was simply too ill to perform. He had lost a tremendous amount of weight and was in such great pain that he finally sought the advice of doctors. Their diagnosis was grim; advanced cancer of the kidney. The tenor fought valiantly against the disease for much of the following year, but lost the battle in the end. Zanelli returned to Chile and died in Santiago on March 25, 1935, just a week shy of his 43rd birthday. Renato Zanelli made a lasting impression on the operatic world during his tragically brief life. In a career as a tenor that lasted only nine years, he established himself as a preeminent dramatic tenor and one of the leading Italianate Wagnerians of his generation. Unfortunately, his recorded legacy is pitifully lacking. Only a handful of recordings, made for Victor (as a baritone) and H.M.V. (as a tenor), exist to preserve the artistry of this great singing actor. These discs reveal a burly, masculine tenor, with an obvious baritonal foundation and rather muscular top notes. Zanelli uses his voice to great effect and his very theatrical interpretations give us some idea of his work on the opera stage. In this recording, Zanelli sings the third act monologue, "Dio! Mi potevi scagliar" from Verdi's Otello. Also heard briefly is baritone Enrico Roggio (1883-1973) as Iago. This was recorded in Milan for H.M.V. on June 22, 1929.
Просмотров: 641 Dead Tenors' Society
Mansfield Fatal Accident
 
01:45
A Good Samaritan is killed while helping a woman hit by a car. ◂ WEWS NewsChannel5 is On Your Side with breaking news & weather updates -- NewsChannel 5 brings you the latest trusted news and information from Cleveland to Akron and throughout all of northeast Ohio. WEWS NewsChannel5 is the leading television station in Northeast Ohio. A proud affiliate of the ABC network, WEWS was the first television station in Ohio. iPhone: http://bit.ly/iOS-wews Android: http://bit.ly/wews-android
Просмотров: 319 News 5 Cleveland
Lakewood Fire Department Ice Rescue Training
 
00:26
Lakewood Fire Department Ice Rescue Training ◂ WEWS NewsChannel5 is On Your Side with breaking news & weather updates -- NewsChannel 5 brings you the latest trusted news and information from Cleveland to Akron and throughout all of northeast Ohio. WEWS NewsChannel5 is the leading television station in Northeast Ohio. A proud affiliate of the ABC network, WEWS was the first television station in Ohio. iPhone: http://bit.ly/iOS-wews Android: http://bit.ly/wews-android
Просмотров: 284 News 5 Cleveland
MetroHealth 175th Anniversary Employee Video (Cleveland, Ohio)
 
05:06
MetroHealth's story wouldn't be complete without highlighting the many contributions of our more than 6,000 employees. To mark our 175th anniversary, we take a look back at our staff's achievements, from delivering more than 200,000 babies since we were founded in 1837 to serving enough patients in 2011 to fill Progressive Field 19 times! We are one of the biggest employers in the region, and are proud of the talented staff that help make MetroHealth such a great place to work.
Просмотров: 984 metrohealthCLE
Joe Biden Campaigns for Hillary Clinton in Parma, Ohio 9/1/16
 
23:21
Vice President Biden Campaign Appearance in Parma, Ohio Vice President Joe Biden campaigned for Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton at an event in pARMA, Ohio, Joe Biden coolly responded to an protester at a Hillary Clinton campaign event earlier tonight who talked about a friend who died in the . When the crowd first tried to drown out the protester, Biden said it’s okay and engaged with him on his objections. And when the man again shouted to Biden “My friend died!”, Biden responded, “So did my son.” Beau Biden served in the my for a number of years and passed away last year after his battle with brain cancer.
Просмотров: 14189 LesGrossman News
Problem Potholes in Painesville
 
02:18
City responds to your complaints ◂ WEWS NewsChannel5 is On Your Side with breaking news & weather updates -- NewsChannel 5 brings you the latest trusted news and information from Cleveland to Akron and throughout all of northeast Ohio. WEWS NewsChannel5 is the leading television station in Northeast Ohio. A proud affiliate of the ABC network, WEWS was the first television station in Ohio. iPhone: http://bit.ly/iOS-wews Android: http://bit.ly/wews-android
Просмотров: 74 News 5 Cleveland
Joe Biden addresses NY Dems
 
55:46
Former Vice President Joe Biden addresses New York Democratic Convention
Просмотров: 167 Eyewitness News ABC7NY
National Alliance for Targeted Parents
 
01:04
This video is about National Alliance for Targeted Parents
Просмотров: 1291 Kay Johnson
Miss Relay 2013 Elyria Ohio
 
02:45
Просмотров: 93 78ninabean
Renato Zanelli & Gianna Pederzini - Carmen finale
 
08:52
Renato Zanelli (1892-1935) was a Chilean tenor who made his mark on the international opera scene during his all too brief career. Born Renato Zanelli Morales in Valparaiso to an Italian father and Chilean mother, he received his education in Europe after his family relocated to Italy in 1894. After returning to his birthplace at the age of 19, Zanelli began studying voice with tenor Angelo Querzé, with whom he worked for the next three years. His debut occurred in Santiago in 1916 as Valentin in Gounod’s Faust. It was as a baritone that Zanelli would build his resume for the next several years. After a successful season in Montevideo, Zanelli moved to New York and auditioned for the Metropolitan Opera. General Manager Giulio Gatti-Casazza offered the young singer a contract and Zanelli made his Met debut in 1919 as Amonasro in Aïda. Sadly, he made little impression (most of the reviews didn’t even bother to mention him) and was soon disenchanted with what the company had to offer him. Zanelli sang seventeen performances of five roles…Amonasro in Aïda, Don Carlo in La Forza del Destino, di Luna in Il Trovatore, Tonio in Pagliacci, Valentin in Faust and Dodon in Le Coq d’Or…as well as fourteen Sunday Night Concerts. After four seasons…bookended by Amonasros…Zanelli decided to call it quits at the Met. Before leaving New York, however, he sang one final baritone role. In a performance of excerpts from Otello in Central Park during the spring of 1923, Zanelli sang Iago to the Moor of Antonio Paoli. He then journeyed to Italy for further vocal study. Following a year and a half of intensive work with famed vocal coach Dante Lari (teacher of Giovanni Brevario and Gino Vanelli, among others) and conductor Fernando Tanara, Zanelli reemerged as a tenor. His first role in this new fach was Alfredo in La Traviata at the Politeama Giacosa in Naples in October of 1924. The following month, he took on a much more formidable task, Raoul in Gli Ugonotti at the Teatro San Carlo. In a very short time, Zanelli established himself as a dramatic tenor of the first rate with appearances in the major theaters of Venice, Milan, Florence, Bari, Naples, Turin, Parma, Bologna, Fiume, Lisbon, London, Cairo, Buenos Aires and Rio de Janeiro. His repertoire included the leads in La Fanciulla del West, Tosca, Il Trovatore, La Forza del Destino, Aïda, Andrea Chénier, Mefistofele, L’Africana, Carmen, Norma, Nerone, Pagliacci, Tristan und Isolde, Die Walküre, Lohengrin and his greatest achievement, Verdi’s Otello. In 1930, he created the title role in the world premiere of Pizzetti’s Lo Straniero at the Teatro dell’Opera in Rome and sang Otello to the Iago of his brother, Carlo Morelli (1897-1970) at the Teatro dal Verme that same year. In 1933, Zanelli returned to South America for a series of performances in Santiago and Buenos Aires. The tenor’s career was in full swing and he was at the peak of his vocal powers. Heralded as one of the greatest singing actors of his day, Zanelli seemed destined for a lengthy career. Sadly, things did not turn out that way… During much of 1933, Zanelli admitted to feeling poorly, but ignored his symptoms and pushed himself forward to meet the demands of his busy schedule. In October, he managed two performances of Otello in Santiago and a concert in Osorno. These would prove to be the tenor’s final public appearances. In the early part of 1934, Zanelli was back in the U.S. for a string of opera and concert appearances but was forced to cancel when he realized that he was simply too ill to perform. He had lost a tremendous amount of weight and was in such great pain that he finally sought the advice of doctors. Their diagnosis was grim; advanced cancer of the kidney. The tenor fought valiantly against the disease for much of the following year, but lost the battle in the end. Zanelli returned to Chile and died in Santiago on March 25, 1935, just a week shy of his 43rd birthday. Renato Zanelli made a lasting impression on the operatic world during his tragically brief life. In a career as a tenor that lasted only nine years, he established himself as a preeminent dramatic tenor and one of the leading Italianate Wagnerians of his generation. Unfortunately, his recorded legacy is pitifully lacking. Only a handful of recordings, made for Victor (as a baritone) and H.M.V. (as a tenor), exist to preserve the artistry of this great singing actor. These discs reveal a burly, masculine tenor, with an obvious baritonal foundation and rather muscular top notes. Zanelli uses his voice to great effect and his very theatrical interpretations give us some idea of his work on the opera stage. Here, Zanelli joins forces with Gianna Pederzini (1900-1988) for the finale to Bizet's Carmen, sung in Italian. This remarkable performance was recorded at two separate sessions (on December 11, 1929 and May 24, 1931, respectively) for H.M.V. in Milan.
Просмотров: 364 Dead Tenors' Society
Bisphenol A:  EFSA consults on its assessment of human health risks
 
05:46
EFSA has launched a public consultation on its draft assessment of health risks from exposure to bisphenol A (BPA). This includes a re-evaluation of the tolerable daily intake (TDI) for BPA in the light of all the available evidence. It is also the Authority's first evaluation of the health risks for all population groups -- including fetuses, infants, young children and adults -- resulting from exposure to BPA from both dietary and non-dietary sources. In line with EFSA's policy on openness and transparency, all stakeholders and interested parties are invited to comment on the document through an online public consultation that runs until 13 March 2014.
Просмотров: 3566 EFSAchannel
Heart Health Tips from Cardiologist Dr. Lawrence Phillips
 
01:17
In honor of American Heart Month, Dr. Lawrence Phillips, Director of Nuclear Cardiology at NYU Langone Medical Center, talks about simple tips for maintaining and improving your heart health throughout the year. These include visiting your doctor to have your blood pressure and cholesterol checked, eating healthy, and exercising. Subscribe to NYU Langone's YouTube channel: http://www.youtube.com/nyulmc. Stay up to date by following us on: http://www.facebook.com/NYULangone http://www.twitter.com/nyulmc http://www.instagram.com/NYULangone
Просмотров: 989 NYU Langone Health
A Legacy of Philanthropy at University Hospitals
 
02:03
Philanthropy has been very important at University Hospitals since 1866. Crucial to all the individual hospitals that make up University Hospitals is the ongoing support from the community. Growth of UH over the last 150 years can be directly tied to the volunteer leadership and financial gifts contributed by many Northeast Ohioans. Learn more about the history of University Hospitals at, http://www.uh150.org/
Просмотров: 389 University Hospitals
Video: CAIR Releases 2nd Arabic Appeal on 'Innocence of Muslims'
 
00:40
(WASHINGTON, D.C., 9/27/12) -- The Council on American-Islamic Relations (CAIR) today released a second video appeal in Arabic to those protesting an anti-Islam film "Innocence of Muslims." [NOTE: This is the third in a planned series of such videos in various languages to be released by CAIR.] In the CAIR video, Imam Dr. Syed Abu Abdullah of the Islamic Center of Cleveland tells Arabic-speaking viewers that the U.S. government does not support and did not authorize the film. The imam also says that Muslims should not fall into the "trap" set by the film's producers. (NOTE: The appeal was produced for CAIR by Take1Media of Cleveland, Ohio.) Earlier this month, CAIR released a similar video appeal in Arabic. In it, CAIR National Executive Director Nihad Awad tells viewers in the Middle East that ordinary Americans and the U.S. government should not be blamed for the religious hatred expressed in the film. CAIR also released a video appeal in Yoruba, a language spoken by more than 20 million people, to those protesting the anti-Islam film in Nigeria and other parts of West Africa. Video: CAIR Re-Releases Arabic Appeal on 'Innocence of Muslims' https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2K3tZILaLTs Video: CAIR Releases Yoruba Appeal on 'Innocence of Muslims' Protests http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NJ3WPKCwVrI In a news conference with national American Muslim leaders, CAIR condemned the killings of American diplomats in Libya and said that extremists must not be allowed to control the political and religious discourse worldwide. Video: U.S. Muslim Leaders Condemn Killings of American Diplomats http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_dI844aC1qU CAIR had previously called on Muslims in the Middle East to ignore the distribution of the "trashy" anti-Islam film that resulted in the attacks in Libya, Egypt and other nations throughout the Muslim world. SEE: CAIR Asks Mideast Muslims to Ignore 'Trashy' Anti-Islam Film http://tinyurl.com/9z66a44 CAIR is America's largest Muslim civil liberties and advocacy organization. Its mission is to enhance the understanding of Islam, encourage dialogue, protect civil liberties, empower American Muslims, and build coalitions that promote justice and mutual understanding. Become a Fan of CAIR on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/CAIRNational Subscribe to CAIR's E-Mail List http://tinyurl.com/cairsubscribe Subscribe to CAIR's Twitter Feed http://twitter.com/cairnational Subscribe to CAIR's YouTube Channel http://www.youtube.com/cairtv - END - CONTACT: CAIR National Communications Director Ibrahim Hooper, 202-744-7726, E-Mail: ihooper@cair.com
Просмотров: 601 CAIRtv
Inside The Nation's Most Advanced Cancer Hospital
 
01:54
Next-generation hospital opens as cancer is set to become leading cause of death (COLUMBUS, Ohio) – The newest and one of the largest cancer hospitals in the nation is set to open its doors and usher in a new era in the battle against cancer. By 2030 cancer is expected to overtake heart disease as the nation’s number one cause of death, but state-of-the-art facilities like the new James Cancer Hospital and Solove Research Institute at Ohio State are helping doctors and researchers in their efforts to stay one step ahead. The 21-story hospital is more than a million square feet and is among the first to feature patient rooms, education centers and research labs all on the same floor. “I think this kind of integration, having research right alongside patient care on the same floor, is really the future of cancer care,” said Dr. Michael Caligiuri, director of The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center and chief executive officer of the James Cancer Hospital and Solove Research Institute. “Our hope is that the interactions between our patients, doctors and researchers will lead to real inspiration,” said Caliguiri.
Surrogate Mother Cincinnati OH | Call (513) 795-1240
 
00:39
Surrogate Mother Cincinnati OH | Call (513) 795-1240 Today! Ohio Surrogate Agency | Surrogacy Ohio | Surrogate Mother Ohio | Surrogacy Agency Ohio -- CLICK HERE -- http://surrogatemotherohio.com Surrogate Mothers and Intended Parents Call Us Today! (513) 795-1240 Surrogate Mother Ohio is an online surrogacy agency that specializes in matching intended parents with qualified surrogate mothers both here in the US and internationally. Our years of expertise and experience with fertility and surrogacy enable us to find the best surrogate mothers for our intended parents. We Match Intended Parents And Surrogate Mothers Everyday! Do you want to become a Surrogate Mother? Apply Today: http://surrogatemotherohio.com/surrogates-apply-now For more information on our surrogacy services please visit our website: http://surrogatemotherohio.com Call Us Today! (513) 795-1240 CLIENT SATISFACTION: Our years of experience in online services, fertility and surrogacy enable us to help intended parents and surrogates. We ensure that our clients enjoy the best possible surrogacy journey. Surrogate Mother Ohio (513) 795-1240 https://www.facebook.com/SurrogateMotherOhio https://twitter.com/SurrogateOhio https://plus.google.com/u/0/106434331645114452147/about Service Areas: Columbus OH, Cleveland OH, Cincinnati OH, Toledo OH, Akron OH, Dayton OH, Parma OH, Canton OH, Youngstown OH, Lorain OH Call Us Today! (513) 795-1240 Related Services: Surrogate, Surrogate Mother, Surrogates, Surrogate Mothers, Surrogacy Agency, Surrogate Agency, Ohio Surrogate Agency, Surrogate Agency in Ohio, Ohio Surrogate, Ohio Surrogate Mother, Surrogate Mother in Ohio, Ohio Surrogacy, Ohio Surrogacy Agency, Be a Surrogate in Ohio, Be a Surrogate, Become a Surrogate, Become a Surrogate Mother, Surrogates, Surrogate Mom, Surrogate Moms, Surrogate Mommy, Surrogate Mommies, Surrogate Agencies, Surrogacy Agencies, Gestational Carrier, Gestational Surrogate, Gestational Surrogate Mom, Gestational Surrogate Mother, Gestational Surrogate Mom, Gestational Surrogate Mommy, How to Become a Surrogate, Gestational Carriers, Gestational Surrogates
Просмотров: 9 Surrogate Mother Ohio
POLICE STATE - 5 Year Old Boy Suspended From Kindergarten For Getting A "Disruptive" Mohawk
 
00:42
PARMA, OH - A mother in Ohio is outraged after being told her son can't return to school unless he gets rid of his mohawk. The 5-year-old was sent home from kindergarten last week over the hair style and has not been back since. She said keeping him out of class is too severe a punishment. "I'm going to have to take him to go get it shaved because obviously he has to go to school," Keshia Castle said. "I'm already going to a mediation because he's missed a few days of school." The school district told her that his hair caused a disturbance in class because teachers couldn't keep the attention of the other students. My channel https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCfz2_xv38l_AHqWahpUJxDg
Просмотров: 99 Science & Tech
Renato Zanelli - Improvviso
 
04:16
Renato Zanelli (1892-1935) was a Chilean tenor who made his mark on the international opera scene during his all too brief career. Born Renato Zanelli Morales in Valparaiso to an Italian father and Chilean mother, he received his education in Europe after his family relocated to Italy in 1894. After returning to his birthplace at the age of 19, Zanelli began studying voice with tenor Angelo Querzé, with whom he worked for the next three years. His debut occurred in Santiago in 1916 as Valentin in Gounod’s Faust. It was as a baritone that Zanelli would build his resume for the next several years. After a successful season in Montevideo, Zanelli moved to New York and auditioned for the Metropolitan Opera. General Manager Giulio Gatti-Casazza offered the young singer a contract and Zanelli made his Met debut in 1919 as Amonasro in Aïda. Sadly, he made little impression (most of the reviews didn’t even bother to mention him) and was soon disenchanted with what the company had to offer him. Zanelli sang seventeen performances of five roles…Amonasro in Aïda, Don Carlo in La Forza del Destino, di Luna in Il Trovatore, Tonio in Pagliacci, Valentin in Faust and Dodon in Le Coq d’Or…as well as fourteen Sunday Night Concerts. After four seasons…bookended by Amonasros…Zanelli decided to call it quits at the Met. Before leaving New York, however, he sang one final baritone role. In a performance of excerpts from Otello in Central Park during the spring of 1923, Zanelli sang Iago to the Moor of Antonio Paoli. He then journeyed to Italy for further vocal study. Following a year and a half of intensive work with famed vocal coach Dante Lari (teacher of Giovanni Brevario and Gino Vanelli, among others) and conductor Fernando Tanara, Zanelli reemerged as a tenor. His first role in this new fach was Alfredo in La Traviata at the Politeama Giacosa in Naples in October of 1924. The following month, he took on a much more formidable task, Raoul in Gli Ugonotti at the Teatro San Carlo. In a very short time, Zanelli established himself as a dramatic tenor of the first rate with appearances in the major theaters of Venice, Milan, Florence, Bari, Naples, Turin, Parma, Bologna, Fiume, Lisbon, London, Cairo, Buenos Aires and Rio de Janeiro. His repertoire included the leads in La Fanciulla del West, Tosca, Il Trovatore, La Forza del Destino, Aïda, Andrea Chénier, Mefistofele, L’Africana, Carmen, Norma, Nerone, Pagliacci, Tristan und Isolde, Die Walküre, Lohengrin and his greatest achievement, Verdi’s Otello. In 1930, he created the title role in the world premiere of Pizzetti’s Lo Straniero at the Teatro dell’Opera in Rome and sang Otello to the Iago of his brother, Carlo Morelli (1897-1970) at the Teatro dal Verme that same year. In 1933, Zanelli returned to South America for a series of performances in Santiago and Buenos Aires. The tenor’s career was in full swing and he was at the peak of his vocal powers. Heralded as one of the greatest singing actors of his day, Zanelli seemed destined for a lengthy career. Sadly, things did not turn out that way… During much of 1933, Zanelli admitted to feeling poorly, but ignored his symptoms and pushed himself forward to meet the demands of his busy schedule. In October, he managed two performances of Otello in Santiago and a concert in Osorno. These would prove to be the tenor’s final public appearances. In the early part of 1934, Zanelli was back in the U.S. for a string of opera and concert appearances but was forced to cancel when he realized that he was simply too ill to perform. He had lost a tremendous amount of weight and was in such great pain that he finally sought the advice of doctors. Their diagnosis was grim; advanced cancer of the kidney. The tenor fought valiantly against the disease for much of the following year, but lost the battle in the end. Zanelli returned to Chile and died in Santiago on March 25, 1935, just a week shy of his 43rd birthday. Renato Zanelli made a lasting impression on the operatic world during his tragically brief life. In a career as a tenor that lasted only nine years, he established himself as a preeminent dramatic tenor and one of the leading Italianate Wagnerians of his generation. Unfortunately, his recorded legacy is pitifully lacking. Only a handful of recordings, made for Victor (as a baritone) and H.M.V. (as a tenor), exist to preserve the artistry of this great singing actor. These discs reveal a burly, masculine tenor, with an obvious baritonal foundation and rather muscular top notes. Zanelli uses his voice to great effect and his very theatrical interpretations give us some idea of his work on the opera stage. Here, Zanelli sings "Un dì all'azzurro spazio" from Andrea Chénier. This recording was made in Milan for H.M.V. on June 25, 1929.
Просмотров: 585 Dead Tenors' Society
Renato Zanelli - Niun mi tema
 
04:43
Renato Zanelli (1892-1935) was a Chilean tenor who made his mark on the international opera scene during his all too brief career. Born Renato Zanelli Morales in Valparaiso to an Italian father and Chilean mother, he received his education in Europe after his family relocated to Italy in 1894. After returning to his birthplace at the age of 19, Zanelli began studying voice with tenor Angelo Querzé, with whom he worked for the next three years. His debut occurred in Santiago in 1916 as Valentin in Gounod’s Faust. It was as a baritone that Zanelli would build his resume for the next several years. After a successful season in Montevideo, Zanelli moved to New York and auditioned for the Metropolitan Opera. General Manager Giulio Gatti-Casazza offered the young singer a contract and Zanelli made his Met debut in 1919 as Amonasro in Aïda. Sadly, he made little impression (most of the reviews didn’t even bother to mention him) and was soon disenchanted with what the company had to offer him. Zanelli sang seventeen performances of five roles…Amonasro in Aïda, Don Carlo in La Forza del Destino, di Luna in Il Trovatore, Tonio in Pagliacci, Valentin in Faust and Dodon in Le Coq d’Or…as well as fourteen Sunday Night Concerts. After four seasons…bookended by Amonasros…Zanelli decided to call it quits at the Met. Before leaving New York, however, he sang one final baritone role. In a performance of excerpts from Otello in Central Park during the spring of 1923, Zanelli sang Iago to the Moor of Antonio Paoli. He then journeyed to Italy for further vocal study. Following a year and a half of intensive work with famed vocal coach Dante Lari (teacher of Giovanni Brevario and Gino Vanelli, among others) and conductor Fernando Tanara, Zanelli reemerged as a tenor. His first role in this new fach was Alfredo in La Traviata at the Politeama Giacosa in Naples in October of 1924. The following month, he took on a much more formidable task, Raoul in Gli Ugonotti at the Teatro San Carlo. In a very short time, Zanelli established himself as a dramatic tenor of the first rate with appearances in the major theaters of Venice, Milan, Florence, Bari, Naples, Turin, Parma, Bologna, Fiume, Lisbon, London, Cairo, Buenos Aires and Rio de Janeiro. His repertoire included the leads in La Fanciulla del West, Tosca, Il Trovatore, La Forza del Destino, Aïda, Andrea Chénier, Mefistofele, L’Africana, Carmen, Norma, Nerone, Pagliacci, Tristan und Isolde, Die Walküre, Lohengrin and his greatest achievement, Verdi’s Otello. In 1930, he created the title role in the world premiere of Pizzetti’s Lo Straniero at the Teatro dell’Opera in Rome and sang Otello to the Iago of his brother, Carlo Morelli (1897-1970) at the Teatro dal Verme that same year. In 1933, Zanelli returned to South America for a series of performances in Santiago and Buenos Aires. The tenor’s career was in full swing and he was at the peak of his vocal powers. Heralded as one of the greatest singing actors of his day, Zanelli seemed destined for a lengthy career. Sadly, things did not turn out that way… During much of 1933, Zanelli admitted to feeling poorly, but ignored his symptoms and pushed himself forward to meet the demands of his busy schedule. In October, he managed two performances of Otello in Santiago and a concert in Osorno. These would prove to be the tenor’s final public appearances. In the early part of 1934, Zanelli was back in the U.S. for a string of opera and concert appearances but was forced to cancel when he realized that he was simply too ill to perform. He had lost a tremendous amount of weight and was in such great pain that he finally sought the advice of doctors. Their diagnosis was grim; advanced cancer of the kidney. The tenor fought valiantly against the disease for much of the following year, but lost the battle in the end. Zanelli returned to Chile and died in Santiago on March 25, 1935, just a week shy of his 43rd birthday. Renato Zanelli made a lasting impression on the operatic world during his tragically brief life. In a career as a tenor that lasted only nine years, he established himself as a preeminent dramatic tenor and one of the leading Italianate Wagnerians of his generation. Unfortunately, his recorded legacy is pitifully lacking. Only a handful of recordings, made for Victor (as a baritone) and H.M.V. (as a tenor), exist to preserve the artistry of this great singing actor. These discs reveal a burly, masculine tenor, with an obvious baritonal foundation and rather muscular top notes. Zanelli uses his voice to great effect and his very theatrical interpretations give us some idea of his work on the opera stage. In this recording, Zanelli sings "Niun mi tema" from Verdi's Otello. Also heard briefly are tenor Nello Palai as Cassio and bass Guglielmo Masini as Montano. This was recorded in Milan for H.M.V. on June 22, 1929.
Просмотров: 348 Dead Tenors' Society
Firefighter and nurse deliver their own baby in car
 
02:45
MONFORT HEIGHTS, Ohio (Rich Jaffe) - It was a wild ride Monday, Feb. 15, for a young couple as they raced mother nature, trying to get to the hospital before their baby was born. While they didn't make it, everyone was fine! Early Monday morning a very pregnant Kaitlin Hursong told her husband it was time to go, "So he was waking up the baby and started to get her in the car and I told him at that point, 'I don't think we're gonna make it to the hospital.' I could kind of tell." Katy said moments later, her water didn't break it exploded, but the Hursong's were prepared. "Leaving the house, knowing we weren't going to make it to the hospital that was instinct. It was also being a nurse, because they say when you feel the urge to push it's probably going to happen. Then I've done it once before so..." Katy laughed. Dad, Rob Hursong Junior, is a firefighter paramedic working for Harrison. He started driving for Mercy West with Katy on all fours in the front seat. Before hitting the road at 5:30 a.m. Robbie called his dad, Harrison Fire Chief Rob Hursong Senior. The Chief said, "15 minutes later phone rings again. Thinking he forgot something, wanting me to go to the house, says your grandson's here. I said you're joking. I said some other things, said, 'You're joking.' 'No I'm serious. We just delivered in the front seat of the car.'" While the Hursong's had every intention of having a perfectly normal delivery at the hospital, the baby evidently has a mind of his own and decided he wanted to be born right there on U.S.-50 between Lawrenceburg High School and I-275. Never stopping, Rob made an amazingly calm call to dispatch. "Fire dispatcher Thomas...Uhh this is Rob. Off duty right now, my wife just delivered our baby in our front seat." Rob explained, "I mean the same thing would have happened if we'd been in the back of an ambulance; deliver, wait for the cord to stop pulsating before we clamp and cut it. She actually tried to suction his nose and mouth with her mouth because we didn't have anything so." Clearly, for this family, a family emergency is just another day at the office. Huxley Caston Hursong weighed in at 8 pounds 10 ounces. He's 21 inches long and is doing fine. Katy's dad is also a Cincinnati firefighter and her mom said Katy was a second child as well. She too was a surprise delivery at home while dad was on duty!
Просмотров: 675 LOCAL 12
Renato Zanelli - Ora e per sempre addio
 
02:11
Renato Zanelli (1892-1935) was a Chilean tenor who made his mark on the international opera scene during his all too brief career. Born Renato Zanelli Morales in Valparaiso to an Italian father and Chilean mother, he received his education in Europe after his family relocated to Italy in 1894. After returning to his birthplace at the age of 19, Zanelli began studying voice with tenor Angelo Querzé, with whom he worked for the next three years. His debut occurred in Santiago in 1916 as Valentin in Gounod’s Faust. It was as a baritone that Zanelli would build his resume for the next several years. After a successful season in Montevideo, Zanelli moved to New York and auditioned for the Metropolitan Opera. General Manager Giulio Gatti-Casazza offered the young singer a contract and Zanelli made his Met debut in 1919 as Amonasro in Aïda. Sadly, he made little impression (most of the reviews didn’t even bother to mention him) and was soon disenchanted with what the company had to offer him. Zanelli sang seventeen performances of five roles…Amonasro in Aïda, Don Carlo in La Forza del Destino, di Luna in Il Trovatore, Tonio in Pagliacci, Valentin in Faust and Dodon in Le Coq d’Or…as well as fourteen Sunday Night Concerts. After four seasons…bookended by Amonasros…Zanelli decided to call it quits at the Met. Before leaving New York, however, he sang one final baritone role. In a performance of excerpts from Otello in Central Park during the spring of 1923, Zanelli sang Iago to the Moor of Antonio Paoli. He then journeyed to Italy for further vocal study. Following a year and a half of intensive work with famed vocal coach Dante Lari (teacher of Giovanni Brevario and Gino Vanelli, among others) and conductor Fernando Tanara, Zanelli reemerged as a tenor. His first role in this new fach was Alfredo in La Traviata at the Politeama Giacosa in Naples in October of 1924. The following month, he took on a much more formidable task, Raoul in Gli Ugonotti at the Teatro San Carlo. In a very short time, Zanelli established himself as a dramatic tenor of the first rate with appearances in the major theaters of Venice, Milan, Florence, Bari, Naples, Turin, Parma, Bologna, Fiume, Lisbon, London, Cairo, Buenos Aires and Rio de Janeiro. His repertoire included the leads in La Fanciulla del West, Tosca, Il Trovatore, La Forza del Destino, Aïda, Andrea Chénier, Mefistofele, L’Africana, Carmen, Norma, Nerone, Pagliacci, Tristan und Isolde, Die Walküre, Lohengrin and his greatest achievement, Verdi’s Otello. In 1930, he created the title role in the world premiere of Pizzetti’s Lo Straniero at the Teatro dell’Opera in Rome and sang Otello to the Iago of his brother, Carlo Morelli (1897-1970) at the Teatro dal Verme that same year. In 1933, Zanelli returned to South America for a series of performances in Santiago and Buenos Aires. The tenor’s career was in full swing and he was at the peak of his vocal powers. Heralded as one of the greatest singing actors of his day, Zanelli seemed destined for a lengthy career. Sadly, things did not turn out that way… During much of 1933, Zanelli admitted to feeling poorly, but ignored his symptoms and pushed himself forward to meet the demands of his busy schedule. In October, he managed two performances of Otello in Santiago and a concert in Osorno. These would prove to be the tenor’s final public appearances. In the early part of 1934, Zanelli was back in the U.S. for a string of opera and concert appearances but was forced to cancel when he realized that he was simply too ill to perform. He had lost a tremendous amount of weight and was in such great pain that he finally sought the advice of doctors. Their diagnosis was grim; advanced cancer of the kidney. The tenor fought valiantly against the disease for much of the following year, but lost the battle in the end. Zanelli returned to Chile and died in Santiago on March 25, 1935, just a week shy of his 43rd birthday. Renato Zanelli made a lasting impression on the operatic world during his tragically brief life. In a career as a tenor that lasted only nine years, he established himself as a preeminent dramatic tenor and one of the leading Italianate Wagnerians of his generation. Unfortunately, his recorded legacy is pitifully lacking. Only a handful of recordings, made for Victor (as a baritone) and H.M.V. (as a tenor), exist to preserve the artistry of this great singing actor. These discs reveal a burly, masculine tenor, with an obvious baritonal foundation and rather muscular top notes. Zanelli uses his voice to great effect and his very theatrical interpretations give us some idea of his work on the opera stage. Here, Zanelli sings "Ora e per sempre addio" from Act II of Verdi's Otello. This recording was made in Milan for H.M.V. on March 12, 1930.
Просмотров: 317 Dead Tenors' Society
George Halle HealthMarkets Parma Ohio presenting to Cuyahoga Valley Champions od BNI 3
 
00:44
George Halle HealthMarkets Parma Ohio.(440) 567-2271 ghalle@healthmarkets.com 5925 RIDGE RD, SUITE 2, PARMA, OH 44129,Health Insurance, Medicare,Life Insurance,Dental Insurance,Vision Insurance,Disability Insurance,Accident Insurance, Critical Illness Insurance,Cancer Insurance,Annuity,Long Term Care Insurance Wellness Program,http://agents.healthmarkets.com/ghalle,44129,44130,44134 www.cyateamllc.com
Просмотров: 2 George G Halle
#0995 The American Corruption- Easter, The Goddess Of  Dawn- New Clothes (Blossoms Of The Trees) ...
 
01:46:28
See All Of Our Online Videos At https://www.youtube.com/user/jimsgraceandtruth/videos 0995 SM040499 The American Corruption- Easter, The Goddess Of The Dawn- New Clothes (Blossoms Of The Trees)- Sunrise Service (Worshipping The Rising Sun (Ezekiel 8:16)- The One Time Resurrection Is A Cancer (Gangrene) Contact us at jimbrown@graceandtruth.net for free Dvds and visit our website at graceandtruth.net A study of NT Greek and OT Hebrew, customs and culture of Israel, Babylon, Persia, Greece, and Rome, the pagan origins of the Christmass and other "holydays / holidays", all for the purpose of understanding what the bible meant when it was originally spoken/written as opposed to what modern "preachers" and "christians" "think" it says; i.e. NO OPINIONS. About Grace and Truth Ministries Jim and Mary Brown I have been preaching and teaching Bible for over 50 years. In 1957, I began studying the scriptures diligently after graduating from high school. In 1980, God began dealing with me, bringing me to what I believed was my deathbed in 1985. In the hospital, I awoke near death crying out to God, "Lord, You are going to kill me if I don't quit living for myself and saying all the truth in my power!!!" Thereafter, I began to say these blunt plain words that appeal to the elect sheep. As a result, I began to make more enemies than I could have ever imagined. I was sick and tired of the “mush” gospel that churches were preaching. My family was confused, and on many occasions on the way home from church, my wife would say, "he said such-and-such last week and he said this-and-that this week contradicting what he said the previous week." I began to say to my wife Mary, "don't listen to the preacher, because he doesn't know what he’s talking about." Finally, I said, "this is a waste of time! We are going home. We are not going to these churches anymore. I will teach you from our home." Twenty years ago, we started Grace and Truth Ministries which included my wife, son and one other young man. We started taping the sermons shortly thereafter. Grace and Truth Ministries is now meeting in a building located in Hendersonville, TN. Last year, by the grace of God, we gave away approximately 25,000 DVDs free-of-charge. We regularly add more television, radio and internet to get the truth to those who have ears to hear. If you are located in a city that does not air our programs, please contact us so that we can let you know how you may help to get this message out to God's predestinated elect family. We are adding new stations every month. God Has Chosen Romans 8:29-30 - "For whom he did foreknow, he also did predestinate to be conformed to the image of his Son, that he might be the firstborn among many brethren. Moreover whom he did predestinate, them he also called: and whom he called, them he also justified: and whom he justified, them he also glorified." Foreknow - to have a personal intimate relationship beforehand. God predetermined that all who belonged to him before the foundation of the world were to "conform" to the word of God in obedience to Christ. All that were predestined were "called", "justified", and "glorified" (past tense verbs). These were fixed in the mind of God before the world began. (Ephesians 1:4; Acts 13:48; II Thessalonians 2:13). The election of the saints is unto accountability (I Peter 1:2). The majority of the protestant church held to this doctrine during the reformation. It is the foundation of "The London Baptist Confession of Faith of 1689". You Baptists are supposed to be believing it and you've discarded this precious doctrine of Grace !!! No Free Will John 1:13 - Which were born, not of blood, nor of the will of the flesh, nor of the will of man, but of God. James 1:18 - Of his own will begat he us with the word of truth, that we should be a kind of firstfruits of his creatures. Romans 9:15-16 - 15For he saith to Moses, I will have mercy on whom I will have mercy, and I will have compassion on whom I will have compassion. 16So then it is not of him that willeth, nor of him that runneth, but of God that sheweth mercy. John 5:21 - For as the Father raiseth up the dead, and quickeneth them; even so the Son quickeneth whom he will. John 6:39 - And this is the Father's will which hath sent me, that of all which he hath given me I should lose nothing, but should raise it up again at the last day. God Does All Things Isaiah 46:10 - Declaring the end from the beginning, and from ancient times the things that are not yet done, saying, My counsel shall stand, and I will do all my pleasure. Eccl. 3:14 - I know that, whatsoever God doeth, it shall be for ever: nothing can be put to it, nor any thing taken from it: and God doeth it, that men should fear before him. Ephesians 1:11 - In whom also we have obtained an inheritance, being predestinated according to the purpose of him who worketh all things after the counsel of his own will:
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