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Indianapolis Walkthon 2015 -American Cancer Society
 
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Indy BAPS Walk-2015
Views: 61 T. Parma
Parma Run for the Pieogies
 
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Third annual Run for the Pierogies in Parma raises money for American Cancer Society and All Faiths Pantry.
Views: 42 News 5 Cleveland
run for the pierogies
 
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Runners and walkers gather to raise money for American Cancer Society Parma Area Relay for Life.
Views: 37 News 5 Cleveland
Joy of Christmas on Call-Back.mov
 
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Segment featuring "The Joy of Christmas" by Ric Valentine as seen on "Call-Back" (www.geoff-callback.blogspot.com) GREENBRIER RETIREMENT COMMUNITY RESIDENT AND COMPOSER FINALLY SEES DREAM PRODUCTION REALIZED ON CASSIDY STAGE TO BENEFIT CANCER SOCIETY Parma Heights, Ohio Communicares Greenbrier Senior Living Community will produce an original holiday musical on the Cox Stage at the Cassidy Theatre. The Joy of Christmas, written and composed by Greenbrier resident, Richard Valentine, 89, will have one performance only at 7:30 p.m. Sunday Dec. 7 at Cassidy Theatre, 6200 Pearl Rd. Parma Hts. Tickets are on sale now for a $5 donation and can be purchased at Greenbrier Retirement Center, 6457 Pearl Rd. in Parma Heights between the hours of 9:30 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. All proceeds will benefit the American Cancer Society. Valentine, a retired music teacher, who taught music in schools in Sandusky, Elyria, Avon Lake and others, began writing the book, music and lyrics to The Joy of Christmas 5 years ago. The musical is based on inspiration he had some years earlier while watching an awe-inspiring sunrise in Arizona. In 2007, Valentine moved to Greenbrier Retirement Community. He often entertains fellow residents by playing the piano and eventually he mentioned to an administrator that he had written an original Christmas musical. Greenbrier sponsors the Cassidy Theatres outreach performing group Cassidy On-Tour. Now the two organizations have partnered to bring Valentines composition to the stage this holiday season. The Joy of Christmas tells the story of a young boy and his world-weary parents who are not in the holiday spirit. Despite their reluctance, the boy convinces them to attend a holiday church service where the family is reminded of the joy, peace and love the holidays really can bring. Valentine wanted the production to benefit the American Cancer Society in honor of his late wife who lost her battle with the disease. Now, the composer himself battles cancer as well. The Joy of Christmas is sponsored by Communicares Greenbrier Senior Living Community and the Cassidy Theatre and stars
Views: 274 Geoffrey Short
Cervical Cancer Misdiagnosis Lawyer Parma, OH 1-800-TEAM-LAW Ohio Lawsuit
 
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Cervical Cancer Misdiagnosis Lawyer Parma, OH 1-800-TEAM-LAW Ohio Lawsuit Call us toll free: (800) TEAM-LAW If you or a loved one now has advanced Cervical Cancer, despite having had regular pap smear testing, it is very likely that your pap smear slides were mistakenly read as negative or that your doctor accidentally overlooked the report or failed to react appropriately to the report of an abnormality. These mistakes may have deprived you of the benefits of early detection, including a higher likelihood of survival. Our team of skilled experts will fully investigate and uncover whether or not avoidable mistakes were made. Coming forward and holding healthcare practitioners accountable for their negligence is a brave and honorable thing to do. You could be saving many others from having to go through the same things that you are now going through. Call us today and schedule a free consultation, and learn more about how we can help. In these types of cases there's never any fee unless we recover money for you. We look forward to your call. Hiring an experienced Cervical Cancer attorney is your best chance to succeed.
Sean Paul - No Lie ft. Dua Lipa
 
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“No Lie” is out now: https://SeanPaul.lnk.to/NoLie1ID http://allseanpaul.com/ Sean Paul https://www.facebook.com/seanpaul/ https://twitter.com/duttypaul https://www.instagram.com/duttypaul/ https://open.spotify.com/artist/3Isy6...” Music video by Sean Paul performing No Lie. (C) 2017 Island Records, a division of Universal Music Operations Limited http://vevo.ly/P3Ov2f
Views: 428398463 SeanPaulVEVO
Renato Zanelli - Dio!  Mi potevi scagliar
 
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Renato Zanelli (1892-1935) was a Chilean tenor who made his mark on the international opera scene during his all too brief career. Born Renato Zanelli Morales in Valparaiso to an Italian father and Chilean mother, he received his education in Europe after his family relocated to Italy in 1894. After returning to his birthplace at the age of 19, Zanelli began studying voice with tenor Angelo Querzé, with whom he worked for the next three years. His debut occurred in Santiago in 1916 as Valentin in Gounod’s Faust. It was as a baritone that Zanelli would build his resume for the next several years. After a successful season in Montevideo, Zanelli moved to New York and auditioned for the Metropolitan Opera. General Manager Giulio Gatti-Casazza offered the young singer a contract and Zanelli made his Met debut in 1919 as Amonasro in Aïda. Sadly, he made little impression (most of the reviews didn’t even bother to mention him) and was soon disenchanted with what the company had to offer him. Zanelli sang seventeen performances of five roles…Amonasro in Aïda, Don Carlo in La Forza del Destino, di Luna in Il Trovatore, Tonio in Pagliacci, Valentin in Faust and Dodon in Le Coq d’Or…as well as fourteen Sunday Night Concerts. After four seasons…bookended by Amonasros…Zanelli decided to call it quits at the Met. Before leaving New York, however, he sang one final baritone role. In a performance of excerpts from Otello in Central Park during the spring of 1923, Zanelli sang Iago to the Moor of Antonio Paoli. He then journeyed to Italy for further vocal study. Following a year and a half of intensive work with famed vocal coach Dante Lari (teacher of Giovanni Brevario and Gino Vanelli, among others) and conductor Fernando Tanara, Zanelli reemerged as a tenor. His first role in this new fach was Alfredo in La Traviata at the Politeama Giacosa in Naples in October of 1924. The following month, he took on a much more formidable task, Raoul in Gli Ugonotti at the Teatro San Carlo. In a very short time, Zanelli established himself as a dramatic tenor of the first rate with appearances in the major theaters of Venice, Milan, Florence, Bari, Naples, Turin, Parma, Bologna, Fiume, Lisbon, London, Cairo, Buenos Aires and Rio de Janeiro. His repertoire included the leads in La Fanciulla del West, Tosca, Il Trovatore, La Forza del Destino, Aïda, Andrea Chénier, Mefistofele, L’Africana, Carmen, Norma, Nerone, Pagliacci, Tristan und Isolde, Die Walküre, Lohengrin and his greatest achievement, Verdi’s Otello. In 1930, he created the title role in the world premiere of Pizzetti’s Lo Straniero at the Teatro dell’Opera in Rome and sang Otello to the Iago of his brother, Carlo Morelli (1897-1970) at the Teatro dal Verme that same year. In 1933, Zanelli returned to South America for a series of performances in Santiago and Buenos Aires. The tenor’s career was in full swing and he was at the peak of his vocal powers. Heralded as one of the greatest singing actors of his day, Zanelli seemed destined for a lengthy career. Sadly, things did not turn out that way… During much of 1933, Zanelli admitted to feeling poorly, but ignored his symptoms and pushed himself forward to meet the demands of his busy schedule. In October, he managed two performances of Otello in Santiago and a concert in Osorno. These would prove to be the tenor’s final public appearances. In the early part of 1934, Zanelli was back in the U.S. for a string of opera and concert appearances but was forced to cancel when he realized that he was simply too ill to perform. He had lost a tremendous amount of weight and was in such great pain that he finally sought the advice of doctors. Their diagnosis was grim; advanced cancer of the kidney. The tenor fought valiantly against the disease for much of the following year, but lost the battle in the end. Zanelli returned to Chile and died in Santiago on March 25, 1935, just a week shy of his 43rd birthday. Renato Zanelli made a lasting impression on the operatic world during his tragically brief life. In a career as a tenor that lasted only nine years, he established himself as a preeminent dramatic tenor and one of the leading Italianate Wagnerians of his generation. Unfortunately, his recorded legacy is pitifully lacking. Only a handful of recordings, made for Victor (as a baritone) and H.M.V. (as a tenor), exist to preserve the artistry of this great singing actor. These discs reveal a burly, masculine tenor, with an obvious baritonal foundation and rather muscular top notes. Zanelli uses his voice to great effect and his very theatrical interpretations give us some idea of his work on the opera stage. In this recording, Zanelli sings the third act monologue, "Dio! Mi potevi scagliar" from Verdi's Otello. Also heard briefly is baritone Enrico Roggio (1883-1973) as Iago. This was recorded in Milan for H.M.V. on June 22, 1929.
New video shows Parma father's surrender to police before son was found dead in the trunk of his car
 
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A Parma father turned himself in for a crime Saturday night. His son was later found dead in the trunk of his car.
Views: 290 News 5 Cleveland
Cleveland Police surprise 80-year-old woman with dog
 
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A generous gesture brought new meaning to community policing on Sunday. ◂ WEWS NewsChannel5 is On Your Side with breaking news & weather updates -- NewsChannel 5 brings you the latest trusted news and information from Cleveland to Akron and throughout all of northeast Ohio. WEWS NewsChannel5 is the leading television station in Northeast Ohio. A proud affiliate of the ABC network, WEWS was the first television station in Ohio. iPhone: http://bit.ly/iOS-wews Android: http://bit.ly/wews-android
Views: 4785 News 5 Cleveland
Renato Zanelli - O Primavera
 
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Renato Zanelli (1892-1935) was a Chilean tenor who made his mark on the international opera scene during his all too brief career. Born Renato Zanelli Morales in Valparaiso to an Italian father and Chilean mother, he received his education in Europe after his family relocated to Italy in 1894. After returning to his birthplace at the age of 19, Zanelli began studying voice with tenor Angelo Querzé, with whom he worked for the next three years. His debut occurred in Santiago in 1916 as Valentin in Gounod’s Faust. It was as a baritone that Zanelli would build his resume for the next several years. After a successful season in Montevideo, Zanelli moved to New York and auditioned for the Metropolitan Opera. General Manager Giulio Gatti-Casazza offered the young singer a contract and Zanelli made his Met debut in 1919 as Amonasro in Aïda. Sadly, he made little impression (most of the reviews didn’t even bother to mention him) and was soon disenchanted with what the company had to offer him. Zanelli sang seventeen performances of five roles…Amonasro in Aïda, Don Carlo in La Forza del Destino, di Luna in Il Trovatore, Tonio in Pagliacci, Valentin in Faust and Dodon in Le Coq d’Or…as well as fourteen Sunday Night Concerts. After four seasons…bookended by Amonasros…Zanelli decided to call it quits at the Met. Before leaving New York, however, he sang one final baritone role. In a performance of excerpts from Otello in Central Park during the spring of 1923, Zanelli sang Jago to the Moor of Antonio Paoli. He then journeyed to Italy for further vocal study. Following a year and a half of intensive work with famed vocal coach Dante Lari (teacher of Giovanni Brevario and Gino Vanelli, among others) and conductor Fernando Tanara, Zanelli reemerged as a tenor. His first role in this new fach was Alfredo in La Traviata at the Politeama Giacosa in Naples in October of 1924. The following month, he took on a much more formidable task, Raoul in Gli Ugonotti at the Teatro San Carlo. In a very short time, Zanelli established himself as a dramatic tenor of the first rate with appearances in the major theaters of Venice, Milan, Florence, Bari, Naples, Turin, Parma, Bologna, Fiume, Lisbon, London, Cairo, Buenos Aires and Rio de Janeiro. His repertoire included the leads in La Fanciulla del West, Tosca, Il Trovatore, La Forza del Destino, Aïda, Andrea Chénier, Mefistofele, L’Africana, Carmen, Norma, Nerone, Pagliacci, Tristan und Isolde, Die Walküre, Lohengrin and his greatest achievement, Verdi’s Otello. In 1930, he created the title role in the world premiere of Pizzetti’s Lo Straniero at the Teatro dell’Opera in Rome and sang Otello to the Iago of his brother, Carlo Morelli (1897-1970) at the Teatro dal Verme that same year. In 1933, Zanelli returned to South America for a series of performances in Santiago and Buenos Aires. The tenor’s career was in full swing and he was at the peak of his vocal powers. Heralded as one of the greatest singing actors of his day, Zanelli seemed destined for a lengthy career. Sadly, things did not turn out that way… During much of 1933, Zanelli admitted to feeling poorly, but ignored his symptoms and pushed himself forward to meet the demands of his busy schedule. In October, he managed two performances of Otello in Santiago and a concert in Osorno. These would prove to be the tenor’s final public appearances. In the early part of 1934, Zanelli was back in the U.S. for a string of opera and concert appearances but was forced to cancel when he realized that he was simply too ill to perform. He had lost a tremendous amount of weight and was in such great pain that he finally sought the advice of doctors. Their diagnosis was grim; advanced cancer of the kidney. The tenor fought valiantly against the disease for much of the following year, but lost the battle in the end. Zanelli returned to Chile and died in Santiago on March 25, 1935, just a week shy of his 43rd birthday. Renato Zanelli made a lasting impression on the operatic world during his tragically brief life. In a career as a tenor that lasted only nine years, he established himself as a preeminent dramatic tenor and one of the leading Italianate Wagnerians of his generation. Unfortunately, his recorded legacy is pitifully lacking. Only a handful of recordings, made for Victor (as a baritone) and H.M.V. (as a tenor), exist to preserve the artistry of this great singing actor. These discs reveal a burly, masculine tenor, with an obvious baritonal foundation and rather muscular top notes. Zanelli uses his voice to great effect and his very theatrical interpretations give us some idea of his work on the opera stage. In this recording, Zanelli sings Tirindelli's delightful song, "O Primavera". This recording, dating from Zanelli's baritone days, was made for the Victor label in Camden, New Jersey on November 29, 1920.
The Sacramental World View
 
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Theology of the Body with Father Thomas J. Loya Explains the structure of the catholic church from it's conception.
Views: 3494 Bob Kasarda
Parma Heights Personal Injury Lawyer, Ohio   Helios Legal Group
 
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Call the Helios Legal Group's personal injury lawsuit hotline 24/7 at (888) 409-9144 for a free, no obligation consultation. We are here to help! UPDATE - We are now taking ovarian cancer from the use of talcum powder (baby powder) cases. Johnson & Johnson is the largest seller of the talc products in question, but there are other manufacturers. If you have used baby powder, and have developed ovarian cancer, please call us right away. Personal Injury Summary - A personal injury incident can result in serious injuries and liability for the parties involved. If the personal injury incident is bad enough, or the injuries are serious enough, it may be necessary to get a lawyer or attorney involved. It may be necessary to file a lawsuit against the person who caused the accident or injuries. If you are injured through no fault of your own, you may have a legal case or legal claim that can result in a settlement for monetary damages. The law is on your side, but there are time limits that govern how long you have to file a claim, and other restrictions. You need to consult a lawyer or attorney so that they can decide the merits of your legal case. The Helios Legal Group is here to help. Personal Injury Video Transcript - Have you or a loved one suffered a personal injury? Many people have a personal injury case and don’t even realize it. The Helios Legal Group can help you get the compensation you deserve. Personal injury cases can include: Motor Vehicle Accidents Workers' Compensation Social Security Disability Veterans Disability Medical Malpractice Birth Injuries, Birth Defects, Cerebral Palsy, and Erb’s Palsy Dangerous Drugs Defective Products Premises Liability such as Slip and Falls, and Dog Bites Mesothelioma and Asbestos Wrongful Death Railroad Worker Injuries or FELA claims If you or a loved one has suffered a personal injury in any of these areas, our experienced intake specialists are here to help you. Call our personal injury hotline for a free, no obligation consultation right now! Other personal injury cases of interest, along with common use, and issue - Zofran - control of nausea/vomiting in pregnancy - fetal birth defects Talcum Powder (Baby Powder) - female genital hygiene - ovarian cancer Xarelto - blood thinner - severe internal bleeding Testosterone / Low-T - hypogonadism (low testosterone) - cardiac problems Actos - diabetes control - bladder cancer SSRI Anti-depressants - depression control - birth defects, cardiovascular disease, suicide General Motors (GM) - ignition defect - sudden loss of power, brakes, steering, airbags Granuflo / Naturalyte - supplements for use in dialysis - alkalosis, cardiovascular injury Lipitor - high cholesterol - diabetes Morcellator - device used laproscopically to mince and evacuate cervical fibroids - uterine cancer, abdominal cancer Risperdal - schizophrenia, bipolar, autism control - development of breasts in boys Transvaginal (pelvic, surgical) mesh - pelvic organ prolapse - incontinence, abdominal pain, infection, migration, embedding Acetaminophen (Tylenol) - pain relief - liver failure Bard IVC Filters - prevent clots traveling from lower legs to lungs - migration, embedding Essure IUD - pregnancy prevention - migration, failure, adverse reactions Abilify anti-psychotic - compulsive behavior, gambling Taxotere - chemotherapy - permanent hair loss
Views: 212 Albert Coppola
Invocation at Polish Constitution Day 2014 in Parma Ohio
 
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Rev. Eric Orzech, Chaplain, Polish American Congress Ohio Division and National Vice-President of Polish American Priests Association gave the invocation at the 2014 celebration of Polish Constitution Day in Parma Ohio. Father Orzech is pastor of both the Shrine Church of St Stanislaus and St Casimir parish in Cleveland. He asked that people remember John Borkowski, president of the Polish American Congress, who was in the hospital. http://www.clevelandpeople.com/groups/polish/polish.htm
Views: 32 Dan Hanson
Landmarks of Courage
 
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Video excerpt from Part - Cancer 1 of the 12-part series Building Universal Awareness...The Group Chalice Full lecture available for purchase: http://bit.ly/1NPQ4mq Interested in the 12-part series Building Universal Awareness...The Group Chalice? Click here to read more: http://bit.ly/1ISI8vj
Views: 541 TSG Foundation
Two smash and grab burglars steal breast cancer donations
 
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Two smash and grab burglars steal breast cancer donations
Parma Personal Injury Lawyer, Ohio   Helios Legal Group
 
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Call the Helios Legal Group's personal injury lawsuit hotline 24/7 at (888) 409-9144 for a free, no obligation consultation. We are here to help! UPDATE - We are now taking ovarian cancer from the use of talcum powder (baby powder) cases. Johnson & Johnson is the largest seller of the talc products in question, but there are other manufacturers. If you have used baby powder, and have developed ovarian cancer, please call us right away. Personal Injury Summary - A personal injury incident can result in serious injuries and liability for the parties involved. If the personal injury incident is bad enough, or the injuries are serious enough, it may be necessary to get a lawyer or attorney involved. It may be necessary to file a lawsuit against the person who caused the accident or injuries. If you are injured through no fault of your own, you may have a legal case or legal claim that can result in a settlement for monetary damages. The law is on your side, but there are time limits that govern how long you have to file a claim, and other restrictions. You need to consult a lawyer or attorney so that they can decide the merits of your legal case. The Helios Legal Group is here to help. Personal Injury Video Transcript - Have you or a loved one suffered a personal injury? Many people have a personal injury case and don’t even realize it. The Helios Legal Group can help you get the compensation you deserve. Personal injury cases can include: Motor Vehicle Accidents Workers' Compensation Social Security Disability Veterans Disability Medical Malpractice Birth Injuries, Birth Defects, Cerebral Palsy, and Erb’s Palsy Dangerous Drugs Defective Products Premises Liability such as Slip and Falls, and Dog Bites Mesothelioma and Asbestos Wrongful Death Railroad Worker Injuries or FELA claims If you or a loved one has suffered a personal injury in any of these areas, our experienced intake specialists are here to help you. Call our personal injury hotline for a free, no obligation consultation right now! Other personal injury cases of interest, along with common use, and issue - Zofran - control of nausea/vomiting in pregnancy - fetal birth defects Talcum Powder (Baby Powder) - female genital hygiene - ovarian cancer Xarelto - blood thinner - severe internal bleeding Testosterone / Low-T - hypogonadism (low testosterone) - cardiac problems Actos - diabetes control - bladder cancer SSRI Anti-depressants - depression control - birth defects, cardiovascular disease, suicide General Motors (GM) - ignition defect - sudden loss of power, brakes, steering, airbags Granuflo / Naturalyte - supplements for use in dialysis - alkalosis, cardiovascular injury Lipitor - high cholesterol - diabetes Morcellator - device used laproscopically to mince and evacuate cervical fibroids - uterine cancer, abdominal cancer Risperdal - schizophrenia, bipolar, autism control - development of breasts in boys Transvaginal (pelvic, surgical) mesh - pelvic organ prolapse - incontinence, abdominal pain, infection, migration, embedding Acetaminophen (Tylenol) - pain relief - liver failure Bard IVC Filters - prevent clots traveling from lower legs to lungs - migration, embedding Essure IUD - pregnancy prevention - migration, failure, adverse reactions Abilify anti-psychotic - compulsive behavior, gambling Taxotere - chemotherapy - permanent hair loss
Views: 458 Albert Coppola
Father of murdered 4-year-old speaks
 
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The father of a murdered 4-year-old girl spoke about charges proposed at theCuyahoga County Division of Children and Family Services.
Parma Heights Fire Chief
 
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Parma Heights Fire Chief Bryan Sloan speaks to the media regarding an overnight fire at City Hall.
Views: 102 News 5 Cleveland
OEC, Parma Heights, Cleveland Heights, and Cleveland
 
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OEC-Diesel: In the Consent Decree between the United States, State of Ohio, and Premcor, Lima Refinery agreed to give the Ohio Environmental Council $50,000 for the installation of diesel retrofit technologies to reduce particle pollution and ozone precursors from municipal trucks and/or buses. This Consent Decree is a result of the US EPA and Ohio EPA identifying violations of certain provisions of the Clean Air Act, its implementing regulations, and the relevant provisions of the Ohio State Implementation Plan. Part of the settlement is this SEP. OEC has targeted the cities of Cleveland, Cleveland Heights, and Parma Heights which are all in Cuyahoga County which is failing air quality standards. These cities are in the process of purchasing diesel retrofits to reduce diesel emissions which have been linked to heart and lung disease, cancer, and preventable death.
Views: 272 OECDiesel
Teen kicking cancer pays it forward
 
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Beating cancer is tough enough for a teen. But Jane Finley of Bay Village also turned that diagnosis around to See The Possible for other kids with cancer. WKYC Channel 3's Dawn Kendrick brings us this "Good Stuff" update.
Views: 53 WKYC Channel 3
Joe Biden Campaigns for Hillary Clinton in Parma, Ohio 9/1/16
 
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Vice President Biden Campaign Appearance in Parma, Ohio Vice President Joe Biden campaigned for Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton at an event in pARMA, Ohio, Joe Biden coolly responded to an protester at a Hillary Clinton campaign event earlier tonight who talked about a friend who died in the . When the crowd first tried to drown out the protester, Biden said it’s okay and engaged with him on his objections. And when the man again shouted to Biden “My friend died!”, Biden responded, “So did my son.” Beau Biden served in the my for a number of years and passed away last year after his battle with brain cancer.
Views: 14187 LesGrossman News
Dennis Kucinich - What About a Third-Party Ticket?
 
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Complete video at: http://fora.tv/fora/showthread.php?t=1467 Ohio Congressman and Democratic Presidential Candidate Dennis Kucinich discusses the role he sees himself holding within the greater Democratic Party. ----- Get to Know the Candidate: 2008 U.S. Democratic Presidential candidate Dennis Kucinich in a conversation with Joseph Epstein hosted by The Commonwealth Club of California. Ohio Congressman Kucinich engages in a wide-ranging conversation about his political views and background. Dennis Kucinich is an American politician of the Democratic party. He served as the 53rd mayor of Cleveland, Ohio from 1977 to 1979, a tumultuous term in which he survived a recall election and was successful in a battle against selling the municipal electric utility. He today serves as the Representative (Member of Congress) for the 10th District of Ohio. It includes most of western Cleveland, as well as such suburbs as Parma and Cuyahoga Heights. He ran for President of the United States in 2004 and has announced his candidacy for the Democratic nomination for President in 2008. He is currently the chairman of the Domestic Policy Subcommittee of the House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform.
Views: 12703 FORA.tv
Proposed Ban on Tanning Beds Being Debated
 
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OHIO -- A new push to keep teens out of the tanning beds is now being debated by a Senate House Committee.The bill would ban teens under 18 from the tanning salons all together, something Jennifer Thomas agrees with.I have skin cancer in my family, and I know tanning causes skin cancer, she said.Thomas is grateful her mother is alive.She had melanoma on her face, and they had to remove all of the skin from her nose and they had to cut out a triangle from her forehead, she said, And flipped that down and sewed it to her nose and squeezed her forehead back together.No picture to show, but she says you can't even tell what happened.But the pain and grief her and her family went through was bad enough.It took a long time to heal, and it's not something I would want to go through, said Thomas.And she doesn't want anyone else to go through it either, which is why she supports Senate Bill 113.At this moment, all teens have to do is have a parent sign a waiver saying they can tan.If the bill would pass, teens under 18 would be banned from the tanning salons all together.Well the science has become more conclusive about the link between tanning beds and the link between cancer and melanoma, said Jeff Stephens, American Cancer Society.Lawmakers backing the bill, and those fighting for it say it's all about keeping teens alive.The pressure to be cute and tan for prom and those kind of event is really strong as a teenager so I think it's a really great idea, said Thomas.Senate Bill 113 got its second hearing in front of the committee Wednesday.It still has to pass the full House and Senate.
Views: 66 WKEFandWRGT
Trump wants the NHS to pay MORE for drugs from US big pharma
 
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In one of the most ridiculous statements he has made so far, Donald Trump seems to think if the NHS in the UK paid more for drugs from the US, drugs in the US would be cheaper!
Views: 736 Gordon Dimmack
Concrete Parma OH | 216.362.0900 | Commercial Concrete Contractor Parma Ohio
 
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http://21stcenturyconcrete.com Need concrete for your commercial project in the Parma Ohio area? We've got you covered! 21st Century Concrete provides concrete for municipal buildings, arenas, healthcare facilities, shopping centers, restaurants, manufacturing facilities, warehouses, parking garages and office buildings. Our services include pre-stressed, multilevel buildings, foundations, structural-engineered designs. We are ODOT certified and in addition to concrete work we now do electrical signalization and infrastructure projects. Our satisfied clients include: NASA, Cleveland Clinic, University Hospitals, ODOT, Cuyahoga Community College, Cleveland State University and RTA. No concrete job is too big or too small for 21st Century Concrete Construction Contractors. Call us at 216-362-0900 today.
Views: 340 GreenGorillaVideo3
Naloxone: experience and perspectives
 
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The use of naloxone as a life-saving treatment for overdose is critical in reducing the harms associated with prescription and illicit opioids. Penington Institute, with the support of the Stepping Up Consortium, has developed two videos to educate needle and syringe programs; alcohol and drug treatment services; opioid pharmacotherapy program providers; primary health care providers and those at risk of opioid overdose on a range of topics, including: • How naloxone works • Recognising the signs of overdose • How to respond to an overdose • How and where to access naloxone • Safe administration of naloxone • The COPE program and accessing support Naloxone: experience and perspectives – is for frontline workers and people who are at risk of overdose. In the video, police, ambulance officers, doctors and health workers speak about the lifesaving capacity of naloxone, and their support for its use in a community setting.
Views: 907 Penington Institute
Rebecca E. Plude Memorial
 
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All music in this video was written and performed by Keldon Plude Copyright (c) 2011. Rebecca Elizabeth Plude né Kiehl of Davis, CA left this world on October 9, 2007 at Sutter Memorial Hospital after being diagnosed a year before with the rare autoimmune disease Scleroderma. She died of complications due to this and recently diagnosed cancer. Becky was born February 26, 1958 in Cleveland, Ohio. She spent her childhood and youth in Parma, Ohio. As a teen she served as lifeguard and participated in synchronized swimming at the Parma City pools. She also worked as a camp leader for mentally challenged children, instilling in her a lifelong desire to help other people. Her participation in junior high and high school choir would lead to a permanent love of music. She graduated with honors from Parma Senior High School in 1976. Becky attended Cleveland State University, graduating with honors with a degree in physical therapy in 1980. She paid her own way through college, working as many as three jobs at a time. After college, she lived in Michigan and had two children, Phillip Alex (b. 1985) and Keldon Robert (b. 1987) with her first husband. From 1980 through 1989 she held various director positions in acute care, physical therapy facilities and Community Mental Health programs. She moved back to Ohio with her children in 1989. As a single mother, she raised and home-schooled her two sons as a member of the Ohio Home-school Educators Network (OHEN). In addition, she attended seminars at the Institutes for the Achievement of Human Potential (IHAP) in order to optimize the life of her older son who was born with special needs. In 1990 she met her future second husband, Bryan Plude, at West Shore Unitarian Universalist Church in Rocky River, Ohio. Bryan and Rebecca were married on March 21, 1992 and continued to home-school Alex and Keldon. She returned to school to obtain a masters degree in education from Cleveland State University, also receiving a supplementary teaching certificate from the Association Montessori International (AMI). In 1996 Becky's third child, Miakoda Alexandra, was born in their loving home in Cleveland, Ohio. Shortly thereafter the family moved to California where Becky continued to work as a physical therapist. Even with three children, Becky still had much more love in her heart to give; She and Bryan decided to become foster parents. Jeanine Marie (b. 1999) became a Plude when she was adopted in 2001. Becky's love and devotion to all of her family members has been one of her most outstanding qualities throughout her entire life. Rebecca had a deep love for people and for justice, and from those came a strong passion for education, especially for children and young adults who typically fall through the cracks. She has spent much of her life working to realize her vision of an educational paradigm that truly teaches racial and environmental justice, health, and wholeness. A trained Montessori teacher, she worked hard for Yocha-de-he Prep School, carefully crafting an infant toddler program and a preschool program for Native American children. Her latest dream of a paradigm shift for education is a private preschool and elementary school slated to open in August of 2008 in West Sacramento. Having worked countless hours over the last year developing the plans for the Children's Village School, Rebecca most recently held focus groups and recruited and trained the Board of Directors. People were drawn to her the moment she began to weave her beautiful word pictures depicting her image of this school. Overflowing with the promise of her powerful vision, CVS will use Montessori pedagogy in a bilingual setting, offering an exploration of the world's cultures and faiths to children of all ability levels. The realization of this institution will be one of the many marks she leaves on the world. Rebecca's untimely death represents a significant loss for countless children and families who would have continued to benefit from her thirst for equality and justice and dedication to an educational paradigm of wholeness. Becky is survived by her husband Bryan Plude, children Alex, Keldon, Miakoda, and Jeanine, Mother Sandra Kiehl of Dayton, OH, Father Robert Kiehl Sr. of Fort Meyers, FL, siblings and their spouses Robert Jr. and Lyn, Thomas and Jeanette, Michael and Charlene, and Nancy Kiehl and Frank Wylie. The family has requested in lieu of flowers that donations be made to The Scleroderma Foundation at www.sclerodermafoundation.org.
Views: 686 kplude
Dr. John Moore on Cosmetic Dental Associates San Antonio, TX Dental Practice
 
01:25
Dr. John Moore of Cosmetic Dental Associates welcomes you to visit his dental practice and also showed all the latest dental equipment that they us to help patients relieve from dental problems or cosmetic dental problems within the day you visit the practice. Want more informational videos from top San Antonio, TX dentist Dr. John Moore? Checkout testimonial videos from our dental patients who has had Invisalign treatment, cosmetic dental procedure, dental implants, veneers and many more. Visit our YouTube channel at https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCfWmBnLUO6dksEfLSeN3PfA Like us on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/33smile Follow us on Twitter: http://twitter.com/33_smile Pin, save and share photos with us on Pinterest https://www.pinterest.com/33smilecom/ Instagram https://www.instagram.com/drjamsmiles/ Snapchat us on https://www.snapchat.com/add/drjamsmilesf Dr. John Moore, DDS San Antonio, TX Cosmetic Dentist 5837 Babcock Road San Antonio, TX 78240 (210) 951-4444
Renato Zanelli - Esultate!
 
04:42
Renato Zanelli (1892-1935) was a Chilean tenor who made his mark on the international opera scene during his all too brief career. Born Renato Zanelli Morales in Valparaiso to an Italian father and Chilean mother, he received his education in Europe after his family relocated to Italy in 1894. After returning to his birthplace at the age of 19, Zanelli began studying voice with tenor Angelo Querzé, with whom he worked for the next three years. His debut occurred in Santiago in 1916 as Valentin in Gounod’s Faust. It was as a baritone that Zanelli would build his resume for the next several years. After a successful season in Montevideo, Zanelli moved to New York and auditioned for the Metropolitan Opera. General Manager Giulio Gatti-Casazza offered the young singer a contract and Zanelli made his Met debut in 1919 as Amonasro in Aïda. Sadly, he made little impression (most of the reviews didn’t even bother to mention him) and was soon disenchanted with what the company had to offer him. Zanelli sang seventeen performances of five roles…Amonasro in Aïda, Don Carlo in La Forza del Destino, di Luna in Il Trovatore, Tonio in Pagliacci, Valentin in Faust and Dodon in Le Coq d’Or…as well as fourteen Sunday Night Concerts. After four seasons…bookended by Amonasros…Zanelli decided to call it quits at the Met. Before leaving New York, however, he sang one final baritone role. In a performance of excerpts from Otello in Central Park during the spring of 1923, Zanelli sang Iago to the Moor of Antonio Paoli. He then journeyed to Italy for further vocal study. Following a year and a half of intensive work with famed vocal coach Dante Lari (teacher of Giovanni Brevario and Gino Vanelli, among others) and conductor Fernando Tanara, Zanelli reemerged as a tenor. His first role in this new fach was Alfredo in La Traviata at the Politeama Giacosa in Naples in October of 1924. The following month, he took on a much more formidable task, Raoul in Gli Ugonotti at the Teatro San Carlo. In a very short time, Zanelli established himself as a dramatic tenor of the first rate with appearances in the major theaters of Venice, Milan, Florence, Bari, Naples, Turin, Parma, Bologna, Fiume, Lisbon, London, Cairo, Buenos Aires and Rio de Janeiro. His repertoire included the leads in La Fanciulla del West, Tosca, Il Trovatore, La Forza del Destino, Aïda, Andrea Chénier, Mefistofele, L’Africana, Carmen, Norma, Nerone, Pagliacci, Tristan und Isolde, Die Walküre, Lohengrin and his greatest achievement, Verdi’s Otello. In 1930, he created the title role in the world premiere of Pizzetti’s Lo Straniero at the Teatro dell’Opera in Rome and sang Otello to the Iago of his brother, Carlo Morelli (1897-1970) at the Teatro dal Verme that same year. In 1933, Zanelli returned to South America for a series of performances in Santiago and Buenos Aires. The tenor’s career was in full swing and he was at the peak of his vocal powers. Heralded as one of the greatest singing actors of his day, Zanelli seemed destined for a lengthy career. Sadly, things did not turn out that way… During much of 1933, Zanelli admitted to feeling poorly, but ignored his symptoms and pushed himself forward to meet the demands of his busy schedule. In October, he managed two performances of Otello in Santiago and a concert in Osorno. These would prove to be the tenor’s final public appearances. In the early part of 1934, Zanelli was back in the U.S. for a string of opera and concert appearances but was forced to cancel when he realized that he was simply too ill to perform. He had lost a tremendous amount of weight and was in such great pain that he finally sought the advice of doctors. Their diagnosis was grim; advanced cancer of the kidney. The tenor fought valiantly against the disease for much of the following year, but lost the battle in the end. Zanelli returned to Chile and died in Santiago on March 25, 1935, just a week shy of his 43rd birthday. Renato Zanelli made a lasting impression on the operatic world during his tragically brief life. In a career as a tenor that lasted only nine years, he established himself as a preeminent dramatic tenor and one of the leading Italianate Wagnerians of his generation. Unfortunately, his recorded legacy is pitifully lacking. Only a handful of recordings, made for Victor (as a baritone) and H.M.V. (as a tenor), exist to preserve the artistry of this great singing actor. These discs reveal a burly, masculine tenor, with an obvious baritonal foundation and rather muscular top notes. Zanelli uses his voice to great effect and his very theatrical interpretations give us some idea of his work on the opera stage. In this recording, Zanelli sings "Esultate!" from the beginning of Verdi's Otello. Also heard in thie performance are tenor Nello Palai as Cassio (and Roderigo), bass Guglielmo Masini as Montano, and baritone Enrico Roggio as Iago. This was recorded in Milan for H.M.V. on June 24, 1929.
Views: 1056 Dead Tenors' Society
Renato Zanelli - Prologue (Pagliacci)
 
05:26
Renato Zanelli (1892-1935) was a Chilean tenor who made his mark on the international opera scene during his all too brief career. Born Renato Zanelli Morales in Valparaiso to an Italian father and Chilean mother, he received his education in Europe after his family relocated to Italy in 1894. After returning to his birthplace at the age of 19, Zanelli began studying voice with tenor Angelo Querzé, with whom he worked for the next three years. His debut occurred in Santiago in 1916 as Valentin in Gounod’s Faust. It was as a baritone that Zanelli would build his resume for the next several years. After a successful season in Montevideo, Zanelli moved to New York and auditioned for the Metropolitan Opera. General Manager Giulio Gatti-Casazza offered the young singer a contract and Zanelli made his Met debut in 1919 as Amonasro in Aïda. Sadly, he made little impression (most of the reviews didn’t even bother to mention him) and was soon disenchanted with what the company had to offer him. Zanelli sang seventeen performances of five roles…Amonasro in Aïda, Don Carlo in La Forza del Destino, di Luna in Il Trovatore, Tonio in Pagliacci, Valentin in Faust and Dodon in Le Coq d’Or…as well as fourteen Sunday Night Concerts. After four seasons…bookended by Amonasros…Zanelli decided to call it quits at the Met. Before leaving New York, however, he sang one final baritone role. In a performance of excerpts from Otello in Central Park during the spring of 1923, Zanelli sang Jago to the Moor of Antonio Paoli. He then journeyed to Italy for further vocal study. Following a year and a half of intensive work with famed vocal coach Dante Lari (teacher of Giovanni Brevario and Gino Vanelli, among others) and conductor Fernando Tanara, Zanelli reemerged as a tenor. His first role in this new fach was Alfredo in La Traviata at the Politeama Giacosa in Naples in October of 1924. The following month, he took on a much more formidable task, Raoul in Gli Ugonotti at the Teatro San Carlo. In a very short time, Zanelli established himself as a dramatic tenor of the first rate with appearances in the major theaters of Venice, Milan, Florence, Bari, Naples, Turin, Parma, Bologna, Fiume, Lisbon, London, Cairo, Buenos Aires and Rio de Janeiro. His repertoire included the leads in La Fanciulla del West, Tosca, Il Trovatore, La Forza del Destino, Aïda, Andrea Chénier, Mefistofele, L’Africana, Carmen, Norma, Nerone, Pagliacci, Tristan und Isolde, Die Walküre, Lohengrin and his greatest achievement, Verdi’s Otello. In 1930, he created the title role in the world premiere of Pizzetti’s Lo Straniero at the Teatro dell’Opera in Rome and sang Otello to the Iago of his brother, Carlo Morelli (1897-1970) at the Teatro dal Verme that same year. In 1933, Zanelli returned to South America for a series of performances in Santiago and Buenos Aires. The tenor’s career was in full swing and he was at the peak of his vocal powers. Heralded as one of the greatest singing actors of his day, Zanelli seemed destined for a lengthy career. Sadly, things did not turn out that way… During much of 1933, Zanelli admitted to feeling poorly, but ignored his symptoms and pushed himself forward to meet the demands of his busy schedule. In October, he managed two performances of Otello in Santiago and a concert in Osorno. These would prove to be the tenor’s final public appearances. In the early part of 1934, Zanelli was back in the U.S. for a string of opera and concert appearances but was forced to cancel when he realized that he was simply too ill to perform. He had lost a tremendous amount of weight and was in such great pain that he finally sought the advice of doctors. Their diagnosis was grim; advanced cancer of the kidney. The tenor fought valiantly against the disease for much of the following year, but lost the battle in the end. Zanelli returned to Chile and died in Santiago on March 25, 1935, just a week shy of his 43rd birthday. Renato Zanelli made a lasting impression on the operatic world during his tragically brief life. In a career as a tenor that lasted only nine years, he established himself as a preeminent dramatic tenor and one of the leading Italianate Wagnerians of his generation. Unfortunately, his recorded legacy is pitifully lacking. Only a handful of recordings, made for Victor (as a baritone) and H.M.V. (as a tenor), exist to preserve the artistry of this great singing actor. These discs reveal a burly, masculine tenor, with an obvious baritonal foundation and rather muscular top notes. Zanelli uses his voice to great effect and his very theatrical interpretations give us some idea of his work on the opera stage. As a request, here is a fine representation of Zanelli as a baritone...the famous Prologue to Leoncavallo's Pagliacci. This recording was made on two separate discs for the Victor label in Camden, NJ on October 7, 1919.
Renato Zanelli - Improvviso
 
04:16
Renato Zanelli (1892-1935) was a Chilean tenor who made his mark on the international opera scene during his all too brief career. Born Renato Zanelli Morales in Valparaiso to an Italian father and Chilean mother, he received his education in Europe after his family relocated to Italy in 1894. After returning to his birthplace at the age of 19, Zanelli began studying voice with tenor Angelo Querzé, with whom he worked for the next three years. His debut occurred in Santiago in 1916 as Valentin in Gounod’s Faust. It was as a baritone that Zanelli would build his resume for the next several years. After a successful season in Montevideo, Zanelli moved to New York and auditioned for the Metropolitan Opera. General Manager Giulio Gatti-Casazza offered the young singer a contract and Zanelli made his Met debut in 1919 as Amonasro in Aïda. Sadly, he made little impression (most of the reviews didn’t even bother to mention him) and was soon disenchanted with what the company had to offer him. Zanelli sang seventeen performances of five roles…Amonasro in Aïda, Don Carlo in La Forza del Destino, di Luna in Il Trovatore, Tonio in Pagliacci, Valentin in Faust and Dodon in Le Coq d’Or…as well as fourteen Sunday Night Concerts. After four seasons…bookended by Amonasros…Zanelli decided to call it quits at the Met. Before leaving New York, however, he sang one final baritone role. In a performance of excerpts from Otello in Central Park during the spring of 1923, Zanelli sang Iago to the Moor of Antonio Paoli. He then journeyed to Italy for further vocal study. Following a year and a half of intensive work with famed vocal coach Dante Lari (teacher of Giovanni Brevario and Gino Vanelli, among others) and conductor Fernando Tanara, Zanelli reemerged as a tenor. His first role in this new fach was Alfredo in La Traviata at the Politeama Giacosa in Naples in October of 1924. The following month, he took on a much more formidable task, Raoul in Gli Ugonotti at the Teatro San Carlo. In a very short time, Zanelli established himself as a dramatic tenor of the first rate with appearances in the major theaters of Venice, Milan, Florence, Bari, Naples, Turin, Parma, Bologna, Fiume, Lisbon, London, Cairo, Buenos Aires and Rio de Janeiro. His repertoire included the leads in La Fanciulla del West, Tosca, Il Trovatore, La Forza del Destino, Aïda, Andrea Chénier, Mefistofele, L’Africana, Carmen, Norma, Nerone, Pagliacci, Tristan und Isolde, Die Walküre, Lohengrin and his greatest achievement, Verdi’s Otello. In 1930, he created the title role in the world premiere of Pizzetti’s Lo Straniero at the Teatro dell’Opera in Rome and sang Otello to the Iago of his brother, Carlo Morelli (1897-1970) at the Teatro dal Verme that same year. In 1933, Zanelli returned to South America for a series of performances in Santiago and Buenos Aires. The tenor’s career was in full swing and he was at the peak of his vocal powers. Heralded as one of the greatest singing actors of his day, Zanelli seemed destined for a lengthy career. Sadly, things did not turn out that way… During much of 1933, Zanelli admitted to feeling poorly, but ignored his symptoms and pushed himself forward to meet the demands of his busy schedule. In October, he managed two performances of Otello in Santiago and a concert in Osorno. These would prove to be the tenor’s final public appearances. In the early part of 1934, Zanelli was back in the U.S. for a string of opera and concert appearances but was forced to cancel when he realized that he was simply too ill to perform. He had lost a tremendous amount of weight and was in such great pain that he finally sought the advice of doctors. Their diagnosis was grim; advanced cancer of the kidney. The tenor fought valiantly against the disease for much of the following year, but lost the battle in the end. Zanelli returned to Chile and died in Santiago on March 25, 1935, just a week shy of his 43rd birthday. Renato Zanelli made a lasting impression on the operatic world during his tragically brief life. In a career as a tenor that lasted only nine years, he established himself as a preeminent dramatic tenor and one of the leading Italianate Wagnerians of his generation. Unfortunately, his recorded legacy is pitifully lacking. Only a handful of recordings, made for Victor (as a baritone) and H.M.V. (as a tenor), exist to preserve the artistry of this great singing actor. These discs reveal a burly, masculine tenor, with an obvious baritonal foundation and rather muscular top notes. Zanelli uses his voice to great effect and his very theatrical interpretations give us some idea of his work on the opera stage. Here, Zanelli sings "Un dì all'azzurro spazio" from Andrea Chénier. This recording was made in Milan for H.M.V. on June 25, 1929.
Renato Zanelli & Gianna Pederzini - Carmen finale
 
08:52
Renato Zanelli (1892-1935) was a Chilean tenor who made his mark on the international opera scene during his all too brief career. Born Renato Zanelli Morales in Valparaiso to an Italian father and Chilean mother, he received his education in Europe after his family relocated to Italy in 1894. After returning to his birthplace at the age of 19, Zanelli began studying voice with tenor Angelo Querzé, with whom he worked for the next three years. His debut occurred in Santiago in 1916 as Valentin in Gounod’s Faust. It was as a baritone that Zanelli would build his resume for the next several years. After a successful season in Montevideo, Zanelli moved to New York and auditioned for the Metropolitan Opera. General Manager Giulio Gatti-Casazza offered the young singer a contract and Zanelli made his Met debut in 1919 as Amonasro in Aïda. Sadly, he made little impression (most of the reviews didn’t even bother to mention him) and was soon disenchanted with what the company had to offer him. Zanelli sang seventeen performances of five roles…Amonasro in Aïda, Don Carlo in La Forza del Destino, di Luna in Il Trovatore, Tonio in Pagliacci, Valentin in Faust and Dodon in Le Coq d’Or…as well as fourteen Sunday Night Concerts. After four seasons…bookended by Amonasros…Zanelli decided to call it quits at the Met. Before leaving New York, however, he sang one final baritone role. In a performance of excerpts from Otello in Central Park during the spring of 1923, Zanelli sang Iago to the Moor of Antonio Paoli. He then journeyed to Italy for further vocal study. Following a year and a half of intensive work with famed vocal coach Dante Lari (teacher of Giovanni Brevario and Gino Vanelli, among others) and conductor Fernando Tanara, Zanelli reemerged as a tenor. His first role in this new fach was Alfredo in La Traviata at the Politeama Giacosa in Naples in October of 1924. The following month, he took on a much more formidable task, Raoul in Gli Ugonotti at the Teatro San Carlo. In a very short time, Zanelli established himself as a dramatic tenor of the first rate with appearances in the major theaters of Venice, Milan, Florence, Bari, Naples, Turin, Parma, Bologna, Fiume, Lisbon, London, Cairo, Buenos Aires and Rio de Janeiro. His repertoire included the leads in La Fanciulla del West, Tosca, Il Trovatore, La Forza del Destino, Aïda, Andrea Chénier, Mefistofele, L’Africana, Carmen, Norma, Nerone, Pagliacci, Tristan und Isolde, Die Walküre, Lohengrin and his greatest achievement, Verdi’s Otello. In 1930, he created the title role in the world premiere of Pizzetti’s Lo Straniero at the Teatro dell’Opera in Rome and sang Otello to the Iago of his brother, Carlo Morelli (1897-1970) at the Teatro dal Verme that same year. In 1933, Zanelli returned to South America for a series of performances in Santiago and Buenos Aires. The tenor’s career was in full swing and he was at the peak of his vocal powers. Heralded as one of the greatest singing actors of his day, Zanelli seemed destined for a lengthy career. Sadly, things did not turn out that way… During much of 1933, Zanelli admitted to feeling poorly, but ignored his symptoms and pushed himself forward to meet the demands of his busy schedule. In October, he managed two performances of Otello in Santiago and a concert in Osorno. These would prove to be the tenor’s final public appearances. In the early part of 1934, Zanelli was back in the U.S. for a string of opera and concert appearances but was forced to cancel when he realized that he was simply too ill to perform. He had lost a tremendous amount of weight and was in such great pain that he finally sought the advice of doctors. Their diagnosis was grim; advanced cancer of the kidney. The tenor fought valiantly against the disease for much of the following year, but lost the battle in the end. Zanelli returned to Chile and died in Santiago on March 25, 1935, just a week shy of his 43rd birthday. Renato Zanelli made a lasting impression on the operatic world during his tragically brief life. In a career as a tenor that lasted only nine years, he established himself as a preeminent dramatic tenor and one of the leading Italianate Wagnerians of his generation. Unfortunately, his recorded legacy is pitifully lacking. Only a handful of recordings, made for Victor (as a baritone) and H.M.V. (as a tenor), exist to preserve the artistry of this great singing actor. These discs reveal a burly, masculine tenor, with an obvious baritonal foundation and rather muscular top notes. Zanelli uses his voice to great effect and his very theatrical interpretations give us some idea of his work on the opera stage. Here, Zanelli joins forces with Gianna Pederzini (1900-1988) for the finale to Bizet's Carmen, sung in Italian. This remarkable performance was recorded at two separate sessions (on December 11, 1929 and May 24, 1931, respectively) for H.M.V. in Milan.
Howard Stern 'Miss America' San Francisco Book Signing News Report 1995
 
02:55
Throwback news clip of a Howard Stern book signing in San Francisco from 11/29/1995. Includes short interview with the man himself. They interviewed me as well, as a 3 year old kid!
Views: 325 Conner O'Reilly
Man Charged With Rape And Murder Of Schaumburg Woman
 
02:11
A 29-year-old man has been arrested in Florida for the rape and strangling death of a 33-year-old woman in her apartment in Schaumburg. CBS 2's Mike Puccinelli reports.
Views: 803 CBS Chicago
National Alliance
 
06:36
National Alliance from the film 'The Protocols of Zion'.
Views: 18386 bones555a
Former chief of crippled power plant dies of cancer at 58
 
01:31
SHOTLIST AP TELEVISION FILE: Fukushima - 12 November 2011 1. Wide of Masao Yoshida, former head of Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant in a meeting with former Environment Minister Hoshi Hosono 2. Close of Yoshida 3. Wide of control room inside the nuclear power plant facility 4. Close of Yoshida 5. Wide of doorstep interview with Yoshida and Hosono 6. SOUNDBITE (Japanese) Masao Yoshida, former head of Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant "In the first week after the accident, it may sound a bit extreme but there were few moments when I thought I was going to die." FILE: Fukushima - 12 November 2011 7. Various of Dai-ichi nuclear power plant facility Tokyo - 9 July 2013 8. Wide of computer screen showing homepage of Tokyo Electric Power Company 9. Close of press release page 10. Mid tilt down of statement 11. Close of statement STORYLINE Masao Yoshida, the man who led the life-risking battle at Japan's crippled nuclear power plant when it was spiralling into meltdowns, has died of cancer of the oesophagus. He was 58. Officials at Tokyo Electric Power Company said Yoshida's illness was not related to radioactive exposure. Yoshida led efforts to stabilise the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant after the March 11, 2011, earthquake and tsunami knocking out its power and cooling systems, causing triple meltdowns and massive radiation leaks. Recalling the first few days when the three reactors suffered meltdowns in succession, Yoshida later said: "In the first week after the accident, it may sound a bit extreme but there were few moments when I thought I was going to die." Yoshida, an outspoken, tall man with a loud voice who wasn't afraid of talking back to higher-ups, but also known as a caring figure to his workers. Even then-Prime Minister Naoto Kan, who was extremely frustrated by TEPCO's initial lack of information and slow handling, said after meeting him that Yoshida could be trusted. Yoshida stepped down as plant chief in December 2011, citing the cancer, after workers had begun to bring it under control. A TEPCO spokesperson said Yoshida died on Tuesday morning at a Tokyo hospital. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/115d788ff3553e3171e90c9e727f1820 Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Views: 146 AP Archive
Bisphenol A:  EFSA consults on its assessment of human health risks
 
05:46
EFSA has launched a public consultation on its draft assessment of health risks from exposure to bisphenol A (BPA). This includes a re-evaluation of the tolerable daily intake (TDI) for BPA in the light of all the available evidence. It is also the Authority's first evaluation of the health risks for all population groups -- including fetuses, infants, young children and adults -- resulting from exposure to BPA from both dietary and non-dietary sources. In line with EFSA's policy on openness and transparency, all stakeholders and interested parties are invited to comment on the document through an online public consultation that runs until 13 March 2014.
Views: 3519 EFSAchannel
Lakewood Fire Department Ice Rescue Training
 
00:26
Lakewood Fire Department Ice Rescue Training ◂ WEWS NewsChannel5 is On Your Side with breaking news & weather updates -- NewsChannel 5 brings you the latest trusted news and information from Cleveland to Akron and throughout all of northeast Ohio. WEWS NewsChannel5 is the leading television station in Northeast Ohio. A proud affiliate of the ABC network, WEWS was the first television station in Ohio. iPhone: http://bit.ly/iOS-wews Android: http://bit.ly/wews-android
Views: 277 News 5 Cleveland
Renato Zanelli - Niun mi tema
 
04:43
Renato Zanelli (1892-1935) was a Chilean tenor who made his mark on the international opera scene during his all too brief career. Born Renato Zanelli Morales in Valparaiso to an Italian father and Chilean mother, he received his education in Europe after his family relocated to Italy in 1894. After returning to his birthplace at the age of 19, Zanelli began studying voice with tenor Angelo Querzé, with whom he worked for the next three years. His debut occurred in Santiago in 1916 as Valentin in Gounod’s Faust. It was as a baritone that Zanelli would build his resume for the next several years. After a successful season in Montevideo, Zanelli moved to New York and auditioned for the Metropolitan Opera. General Manager Giulio Gatti-Casazza offered the young singer a contract and Zanelli made his Met debut in 1919 as Amonasro in Aïda. Sadly, he made little impression (most of the reviews didn’t even bother to mention him) and was soon disenchanted with what the company had to offer him. Zanelli sang seventeen performances of five roles…Amonasro in Aïda, Don Carlo in La Forza del Destino, di Luna in Il Trovatore, Tonio in Pagliacci, Valentin in Faust and Dodon in Le Coq d’Or…as well as fourteen Sunday Night Concerts. After four seasons…bookended by Amonasros…Zanelli decided to call it quits at the Met. Before leaving New York, however, he sang one final baritone role. In a performance of excerpts from Otello in Central Park during the spring of 1923, Zanelli sang Iago to the Moor of Antonio Paoli. He then journeyed to Italy for further vocal study. Following a year and a half of intensive work with famed vocal coach Dante Lari (teacher of Giovanni Brevario and Gino Vanelli, among others) and conductor Fernando Tanara, Zanelli reemerged as a tenor. His first role in this new fach was Alfredo in La Traviata at the Politeama Giacosa in Naples in October of 1924. The following month, he took on a much more formidable task, Raoul in Gli Ugonotti at the Teatro San Carlo. In a very short time, Zanelli established himself as a dramatic tenor of the first rate with appearances in the major theaters of Venice, Milan, Florence, Bari, Naples, Turin, Parma, Bologna, Fiume, Lisbon, London, Cairo, Buenos Aires and Rio de Janeiro. His repertoire included the leads in La Fanciulla del West, Tosca, Il Trovatore, La Forza del Destino, Aïda, Andrea Chénier, Mefistofele, L’Africana, Carmen, Norma, Nerone, Pagliacci, Tristan und Isolde, Die Walküre, Lohengrin and his greatest achievement, Verdi’s Otello. In 1930, he created the title role in the world premiere of Pizzetti’s Lo Straniero at the Teatro dell’Opera in Rome and sang Otello to the Iago of his brother, Carlo Morelli (1897-1970) at the Teatro dal Verme that same year. In 1933, Zanelli returned to South America for a series of performances in Santiago and Buenos Aires. The tenor’s career was in full swing and he was at the peak of his vocal powers. Heralded as one of the greatest singing actors of his day, Zanelli seemed destined for a lengthy career. Sadly, things did not turn out that way… During much of 1933, Zanelli admitted to feeling poorly, but ignored his symptoms and pushed himself forward to meet the demands of his busy schedule. In October, he managed two performances of Otello in Santiago and a concert in Osorno. These would prove to be the tenor’s final public appearances. In the early part of 1934, Zanelli was back in the U.S. for a string of opera and concert appearances but was forced to cancel when he realized that he was simply too ill to perform. He had lost a tremendous amount of weight and was in such great pain that he finally sought the advice of doctors. Their diagnosis was grim; advanced cancer of the kidney. The tenor fought valiantly against the disease for much of the following year, but lost the battle in the end. Zanelli returned to Chile and died in Santiago on March 25, 1935, just a week shy of his 43rd birthday. Renato Zanelli made a lasting impression on the operatic world during his tragically brief life. In a career as a tenor that lasted only nine years, he established himself as a preeminent dramatic tenor and one of the leading Italianate Wagnerians of his generation. Unfortunately, his recorded legacy is pitifully lacking. Only a handful of recordings, made for Victor (as a baritone) and H.M.V. (as a tenor), exist to preserve the artistry of this great singing actor. These discs reveal a burly, masculine tenor, with an obvious baritonal foundation and rather muscular top notes. Zanelli uses his voice to great effect and his very theatrical interpretations give us some idea of his work on the opera stage. In this recording, Zanelli sings "Niun mi tema" from Verdi's Otello. Also heard briefly are tenor Nello Palai as Cassio and bass Guglielmo Masini as Montano. This was recorded in Milan for H.M.V. on June 22, 1929.
Renato Zanelli - Sì, fui soldato
 
02:37
Renato Zanelli (1892-1935) was a Chilean tenor who made his mark on the international opera scene during his all too brief career. Born Renato Zanelli Morales in Valparaiso to an Italian father and Chilean mother, he received his education in Europe after his family relocated to Italy in 1894. After returning to his birthplace at the age of 19, Zanelli began studying voice with tenor Angelo Querzé, with whom he worked for the next three years. His debut occurred in Santiago in 1916 as Valentin in Gounod’s Faust. It was as a baritone that Zanelli would build his resume for the next several years. After a successful season in Montevideo, Zanelli moved to New York and auditioned for the Metropolitan Opera. General Manager Giulio Gatti-Casazza offered the young singer a contract and Zanelli made his Met debut in 1919 as Amonasro in Aïda. Sadly, he made little impression (most of the reviews didn’t even bother to mention him) and was soon disenchanted with what the company had to offer him. Zanelli sang seventeen performances of five roles…Amonasro in Aïda, Don Carlo in La Forza del Destino, di Luna in Il Trovatore, Tonio in Pagliacci, Valentin in Faust and Dodon in Le Coq d’Or…as well as fourteen Sunday Night Concerts. After four seasons…bookended by Amonasros…Zanelli decided to call it quits at the Met. Before leaving New York, however, he sang one final baritone role. In a performance of excerpts from Otello in Central Park during the spring of 1923, Zanelli sang Jago to the Moor of Antonio Paoli. He then journeyed to Italy for further vocal study. Following a year and a half of intensive work with famed vocal coach Dante Lari (teacher of Giovanni Brevario and Gino Vanelli, among others) and conductor Fernando Tanara, Zanelli reemerged as a tenor. His first role in this new fach was Alfredo in La Traviata at the Politeama Giacosa in Naples in October of 1924. The following month, he took on a much more formidable task, Raoul in Gli Ugonotti at the Teatro San Carlo. In a very short time, Zanelli established himself as a dramatic tenor of the first rate with appearances in the major theaters of Venice, Milan, Florence, Bari, Naples, Turin, Parma, Bologna, Fiume, Lisbon, London, Cairo, Buenos Aires and Rio de Janeiro. His repertoire included the leads in La Fanciulla del West, Tosca, Il Trovatore, La Forza del Destino, Aïda, Andrea Chénier, Mefistofele, L’Africana, Carmen, Norma, Nerone, Pagliacci, Tristan und Isolde, Die Walküre, Lohengrin and his greatest achievement, Verdi’s Otello. In 1930, he created the title role in the world premiere of Pizzetti’s Lo Straniero at the Teatro dell’Opera in Rome and sang Otello to the Iago of his brother, Carlo Morelli (1897-1970) at the Teatro dal Verme that same year. In 1933, Zanelli returned to South America for a series of performances in Santiago and Buenos Aires. The tenor’s career was in full swing and he was at the peak of his vocal powers. Heralded as one of the greatest singing actors of his day, Zanelli seemed destined for a lengthy career. Sadly, things did not turn out that way… During much of 1933, Zanelli admitted to feeling poorly, but ignored his symptoms and pushed himself forward to meet the demands of his busy schedule. In October, he managed two performances of Otello in Santiago and a concert in Osorno. These would prove to be the tenor’s final public appearances. In the early part of 1934, Zanelli was back in the U.S. for a string of opera and concert appearances but was forced to cancel when he realized that he was simply too ill to perform. He had lost a tremendous amount of weight and was in such great pain that he finally sought the advice of doctors. Their diagnosis was grim; advanced cancer of the kidney. The tenor fought valiantly against the disease for much of the following year, but lost the battle in the end. Zanelli returned to Chile and died in Santiago on March 25, 1935, just a week shy of his 43rd birthday. Renato Zanelli made a lasting impression on the operatic world during his tragically brief life. In a career as a tenor that lasted only nine years, he established himself as a preeminent dramatic tenor and one of the leading Italianate Wagnerians of his generation. Unfortunately, his recorded legacy is pitifully lacking. Only a handful of recordings, made for Victor (as a baritone) and H.M.V. (as a tenor), exist to preserve the artistry of this great singing actor. These discs reveal a burly, masculine tenor, with an obvious baritonal foundation and rather muscular top notes. Zanelli uses his voice to great effect and his very theatrical interpretations give us some idea of his work on the opera stage. Here, Zanelli sings "Sì, fui soldato" from Giordano's Andrea Chénier. This recording was made for H.M.V. in Milan on June 26, 1929.
Portage County homicide
 
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Portage County homicide
Views: 153 News 5 Cleveland
Lakewood Ohio Fire Department apartment fire on Hopkins Avenue
 
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Apartment fire on Hopkins Avenue Lakewood Ohio
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White House LGBT Pride Month Video Challenge Champions of Change
 
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The White House honors ordinary people who are doing extraordinary things across the country to ensure safety, dignity, and equality for the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) community, as demonstrated by their inspiring video entries in the LGBT Pride Month Video Challenge. July 19, 2012.
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To discuss how policymakers and law enforcement are addressing countering violent extremism abroad and at home, The Washington Institute convened a Policy Forum luncheon with George Selim, director for community partnerships on the National Security Staff; J. Thomas Manger, chief of police in Montgomery County, Maryland; Hedieh Mirahmadi, an Institute visiting fellow and president of the World Organization for Resource Development and Education (WORDE); and Matthew Levitt, director of The Washington Institute's Stein Program on Counterterrorism and Intelligence. Read more: https://www.washingtoninstitute.org/policy-analysis/view/new-strategies-for-countering-homegrown-violent-extremism Theme music copyright by Dexter Britain (www.dexterbritain.co.uk)
Views: 1223 WashingtonInstitute
The Clergy's Take on Dr. Issam Nemeh
 
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The Christian clergy members discuss the work of Issam Nemeh, M.D., specifically his healing services, their personal experiences with Dr. Nemeh, and their personal opinions about him. Featured in the video are: His Excellency, Bishop Roger Gries, O.S.B of the Cleveland Catholic Dioceses Fr. Joseph Fata, Pastor of St. Luke's Catholic Church, Boardman, Ohio Sr. Monica Maria Navin, Sisters of the Incarnate Word, Parma Heights, Ohio Rev. Channing Smith, Rector of Transfiguration Episcopal Church, San Mateo, California For more information on healing services, or to make an appointment with Dr. Nemeh please visit http://DrNemeh.com For Dr. Nemeh DVDs, please visit: http://DrNemehDVD.com
Views: 23585 faithmiracles
Parkha Parkha Mayalu by Krishna Kafle | Nepali Movie MANGALAM Song Ft. Shilpa Pokharel, Puspa Khadka
 
03:34
Parkha Parkha | New Nepali Movie MANGALAM Song Ft. Shilpa Pokharel, Puspa Khadka Chhabiraj Production & Guna Cinema Presents! New Nepali Movie: MANGALAM Releasing on Falgun 4 Song's Title: Parkha Parkha Vocal: Krishna Kafle, Bindu Pariyar Music/Lyrics: Deepak Sharma Choreography: Kabiraj Gahatraj Music Arranger: Narendra Biyogi Starring: Shilpa Pokharel, Samragyee RL Shah, Puspa Khadka, Prithvi Raj Prasai, Nir Shah, Mithila Sharma Cinematography: Bishnu "Kalpit" Ghimire Music: Deepak Sharma Story: Govinda Phuyal Dialogue: Govind Phuyal, Nawal Nepal Edit: Mitra Dev Gurung Production Manager: Karan Shigh, Ramhari Dangol Post production: Film Motion Color: Manoranjan Shrestha Mixing: Mukesh Shah Background Music: Alish Karki Motion Graphics: Styam Rana Promo: Shahil Khan Poster Design: Ideal Designers Executive Producer: Chhabiraj Ojha Producer: Bijendra Shakya, Sakar Okha, Om Gurung Director: Nawal Nepal Prbt: 70145369 Crbt: 0736938 Smart: 10115136 © Highlights Nepal Pvt. Ltd. To stay updated please CLICK HERE to SUBSCRIBE: http://www.youtube.com/user/highlightsnepal2009 Highlights Nepal Pvt. Ltd is authorized to upload this video. Using of this video on other channels without prior permission will be strictly prohibited. (Embedding to the websites is allowed) Visit us @ www.highlightsnepal.com. Connect With Highlights Nepal: Facebook Page: http://www.facebook.com/highlightsnepal Twitter: https://twitter.com/HLNepal Instagram: https://instagram.com/highlightsnepal2009/ Google+: https://plus.google.com/+highlightsnepal2009 iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/gb/app/highlights-nepal/id980657024?mt=8 Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/melodynepal Business Inquiries: info@highlightsnepal.com
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National Alliance Rock Against Israel DC Rally #2
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Joe Biden, Ted Strickland buy Cavs gear
 
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After speaking at a Cleveland Clinic facility, Vice President Joe Biden bought some Cavs gear at the Cavaliers Team Shop.
Views: 2657 cleveland.com
Pastor denies groping girl in pool
 
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Nikolay Kalka, 75, a Ukrainian-born pastor who lives in Parma Heights, testified at his trial that he held a 10-year-old girl's head under a water fountain at the Middleburg Heights recreation center to teach her not to splash. He denied the girl's accusation that he groped her.
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