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Видео добавленное пользователем “ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies”
Morgan Pratchett - The risk of coral bleaching to coral reef biodiversity
 
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Seminar title: The risk of coral bleaching to coral reef biodiversity Presented by: Morgan Pratchett Date: 18-19th October 2007 Seminar type: CoralCoE symposium Presentation given at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies 2007 symposium "Coral reef futures". Bio: Dr Morgan Pratchett is a Principal Research Fellow in the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, based at James Cook University, Townsville. He has broad interests in population and community ecology of coral reef organisms, especially corals and fishes. His current research focuses on major disturbances that impact coral reef ecosystems, with a view to understanding differential responses and vulnerabilities among coral reef organisms. Dr Morgan Pratchett has written several papers describing direct and indirect effects of coral bleaching and outbreaks of crown-of-thorns starfish, considering impacts on both coral assemblages and associated assemblages of coral reef fishes. He is also an international authority on the biology and ecology of coral reef butterflyfishes and his currently writing and editing a monograph dedicated to this iconic family of coral reef fishes (Biology of Butterflyfishes, Science Publishers Inc.).
Glenn Almany - Do fishers get any benefits from marine protected areas?
 
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Seminar title: Do fishers get any benefits from marine protected areas? Presented by: Glenn Almany Date: 20-21th October 2011 Seminar type: Public forum Abstract: Theoretically, marine protected areas can help sustain fisheries by exporting fish to places open to fishing, but hard evidence of this has been elusive. New research tests whether marine protected areas do export fish and where they go. Bio: Glenn Almany is an ARC Future Fellow. His research focuses on coral reef fishes, and he works with fishers in Australia, Papua New Guinea and Solomon Islands to develop science-based management that benefits both reefs and people. He works closely with governments, fisheries managers, environmental conservation organizations and fishing communities.
Bob Steneck - How to kill a coral reef: Lessons from the Caribbean
 
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Seminar title: How to kill a coral reef: Lessons from the Caribbean Presented by: Bob Steneck Date: 18-19th October 2007 Seminar type: CoralCoE symposium Presentation given at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies 2007 symposium "Coral reef futures". Bio: Prof. Steneck studies ecological processes in the benthic marine realm. My experiments focus on the food webs, structure and dominant organisms of coastal marine communities. My "laboratory" is the Gulf of Maine's subtidal zone in which I use SCUBA diving, under- water video systems, manned submersibles and the University of Maine's remotely operated vehicle as primary research tools. I'm currently studying lobsters, sea urchin and kelp in Maine. I also work on the ecology of coral reefs in the Caribbean. In all cases my focus is on in situ ecology. I think an important way to understand the organisms or the system is to observe them first hand - in their habitat.
Alison Green - Rules of thumb for marine protected area design really work!
 
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Seminar title: Rules of thumb for marine protected area design really work! Presented by: Alison Green Seminar type: Public forum Presentation given at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies 2009 public forum "Securing coral reef futures". Abstract: Designing effective networks of marine protected areas (MPA) requires understanding how coral reef species move around among reefs. Unfortunately this information is not available for most species, and managers have been using "rules of thumb" for MPA network design (how big and how far apart the MPAs should be) to try and take this into account. Recently, scientists from the ARC CoE for Coral Reef Studies developed innovative new methods for empirically measuring the movement of coral reef fishes among reefs in a proposed MPA network in Kimbe Bay, Papua New Guinea. Results demonstrate, for the first time, that these rules of thumb for MPA network design really work! Bio: Dr Alison Green is Senior Marine Scientist for The Nature Conservancy's Asia Pacific Conservation Region, and is the Conservancy's strategy lead for designing and implementing resilient networks of marine protected areas (MPAs) in the Coral Triangle. In 2006, Alison led the design of a resilient network of MPAs in Kimbe Bay, Papua New Guinea, and she is currently involved in designing several MPA networks in Indonesia.
Vimoksalehi Lukoschek - Sea snakes of Western Australia
 
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Seminar title: Sea snakes of Western Australia Presented by: Vimoksalehi Lukoschek Date: 20-21th October 2011 Seminar type: CoralCoE symposium Presentation given at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies 2011 symposium "Coral Reefs: Coast to Coast". Bio: Vimoksalehi is a Smart Futures Postdoctoral Fellow who has been studying the molecular ecology, evolutionary history and conservation of marine animals for over ten years. Her sea snake research has spanned many topics including phylogenetics, population genetics and gene flow, evaluating snake fossils for molecular dating analyses, metapopulation dynamic of species on the Great Barrier Reef, paternity analyses, and evaluating the conservation status and assessing extinction risk for most of the world's sea snake species.
What happens to fish when a cyclone destroys their home?
 
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ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies student Jacob Eurich explains the ramifications for damselfish when their home is destroyed by coral bleaching or cyclones.
Jessica Blythe - Understanding impact: situating the social-ecological systems framework in [...]
 
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Seminar title: Understanding impact: situating the social-ecological systems framework in critical development theory Presented by: Jessica Blythe Date: Tuesday 6th October 2015 Seminar type: CoralCoE symposium Presentation given at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies 2015 symposium "Future of Marine Ecosystems". Bio: Jessica is a joint WorldFish/ARC Centre of Excellence postdoctoral research fellow. She completed a BSc from Memorial University in 2004 with a focus on juvenile cod behaviour. After spending a year living in Malawi, she switched from marine biology into the social sciences and completed a Masters from York University in 2009. Jessica earned her PhD from the University of Victoria in 2013, which investigated fishers’ resilience and vulnerability in coastal Mozambique. She uses social science methods to explore life in remote fishing communities in the Solomon Islands, Vanuatu and Kiribati.
Mia Hoogenboom - Ecological stoichiometry of reef-building corals: a test of the growth rate [...]
 
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Seminar title: Ecological stoichiometry of reef-building corals: a test of the growth rate hypothesis Presented by: Mia Hoogenboom Date: Wednesday 7th October 2015 Seminar type: CoralCoE symposium Presentation given at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies 2015 symposium "Future of Marine Ecosystems". Bio: Mia is a senior lecturer at James Cook University and a Chief Investigator in the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies. Mia grew up in Australia and spent time studying in Indonesia before moving to Townsville in 2001. After completing her PhD in 2008, she undertook postdoctoral research in Monaco and Glasgow before returning to the Centre. Her research focuses on understanding how physiological mechanisms influence the population dynamics of corals, the species composition of coral communities, and the overall productivity of reefs.
Hugh Possingham - The seven deadly sins of conservation prioritisation
 
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Seminar title: The seven deadly sins of conservation prioritisation. Presented by: Hugh Possingham Date: Thursday 3 July 2014 Seminar type: CoralCoE symposium Presentation given at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies 2014 Symposium: The Future of Coral Reefs. Biography: Hugh is a Laureate Fellow and the director of both the ARC Centre of Excellence for Environmental Decisions and the National Environmental Research Program hub for Environmental Decisions. Since the 1990s he has pioneered research into how decision science tools from mathematics and economics can bring rigour and efficiency to conservation decisions. In the past decade he has authored several national scientific consensus statements that have delivered major outcomes for marine and terrestrial ecosystems. Hugh has coauthored over 500 publications and been a primary supervisor for over 30 PhD students and 50 honours students. He likes birds.
David Bellwood - Ask not what coral reefs can do for you
 
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Seminar title: Ask not what coral reefs can do for you Presented by: David Bellwood Date: Tuesday 6th October 2015 Seminar type: Public forum Presentation given at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies 2015 symposium "Future of Marine Ecosystems". Abstract: Coral reefs are one of the most spectacular ecosystems on the planet, yet it is increasingly clear that reefs are suffering because of human activities. In this talk David will present a personal view of coral reefs and will examine the role of marine biologists in shaping our understanding of coral reefs, their evolution, ecology and future. Bio: David is a Chief Investigator in the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies and a Distinguished Professor of Marine Biology at James Cook University. He has broad research interests in the evolution and ecology of coral reefs fishes, with over 220 articles in leading international journals. He pioneered the application of ecosystem function approaches to the study of coral reefs, and subsequently used these methods in the evaluation of ecosystem impacts of biodiversity loss and climate change. His current research focuses on developing new approaches to the management of coral reef ecosystems. Instead of documenting declines, his goal is to actively shape a better future for coral reefs and the people who depend on them.
Glenn Almany - Larval dispersal and its influence on fisheries management and biodiversity [...]
 
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Seminar title: Larval dispersal and its influence on fisheries management and biodiversity conservation Presented by: Glenn Almany Date: 10-11th October 2013 Seminar type: CoralCoE symposium Presentation given at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies 2013 Symposium "Coral Reefs in the 21st Century" Bio: Glenn is an ARC Future Fellow in the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies. His expertise is in the ecology of reef fishes, and he works with local communities, NGOs and governments to improve the management and conservation of coral reefs and their fisheries. Current projects include measuring larval fish dispersal, understanding how dispersal impacts fisheries management and biodiversity conservation strategies, and developing new approaches to systematic conservation planning in the Coral Triangle region.
Gladiator corals defend their territory
 
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Learn how competition between soft and hard corals transforms the reefs into battlefields. ARC Centre of Excellence student Natalia Andrade describes how corals defend their territory and jostle for position.
David Bellwood  - Does more biodiversity help you sleep better at night?
 
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Seminar title: Does more biodiversity help you sleep better at night? Presented by: David Bellwood Date: Tuesday Friday 4th July 2014 Seminar type: CoralCoE symposium Presentation given at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies 2014 Symposium: The Future of Coral Reefs. Biography: David is a Chief Investigator in the ARC Centre of Excellence and a Professor of Marine Biology at James Cook University. David’s interests focus on the ecology of coral reef fishes. By combining work on fossils, phylogenies and modern fishes he is able to gain unique insights into the role of fishes on coral reefs. With an active research lab and broad range of international collaborators, his work encompasses global biogeography, ecosystem function and reef resilience. Having published over 230 papers, including 8 in Science or Nature, David has broad interests in coral reef ecosystems, human interactions, and the future of coral reefs. His primary goal, however, is to understand and to find practical solutions to the challenges facing today’s coral reefs.
David Bellwood - Parrot Fish: Lawn-Mowers of the Reef
 
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Seminar title: Parrot Fish: Lawn-Mowers of the Reef Presented by: David Bellwood Date: 18-19th October 2007 Seminar type: Public forum Presentation given at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies 2007 public forum "Coral reef futures". Bio: Professor David Bellwood is a Chief Investigator in the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies. He has held positions in Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food (UK), the Natural History Museum (London) and Silliman University (Philippines). David's research encompasses biogeography, paleoecology, biomechanics and behavioural ecology. His primary interests focus on the role of fishes on coral reefs and the relationship between species diversity and ecosystem function at global scales.
Metapopulation persistence from a network approach - Jessica Zamborain Mason
 
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2018 Virgina Chadwick Award winner presentation When it comes to network metrics, it's time to let the fish return home. "Using 'real world' network analysis can help us understand metapopulation persistence of fish species," says Jessica Zamborain Mason
Bill Leggat - Looking into the black box of the Symbiodinium genomics
 
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Seminar title: Looking into the black box of the Symbiodinium genomics Presented by: Bill Leggat Date: 7-8th October 2010 Seminar type: CoralCoE symposium Presentation given at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies 2010: Coral Reefs in a Changing Environment. Bio: Bill is a Chief Investigator in the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies. Bill studies the dinoflagellate Symbiodinium, and his research focuses on linking changes in the gene expression of Symbiodinium to physiological of the algae and the intact coral holobiont (its host), and subsequent ecological changes. In particular, he is interested in how these dinoflagellates respond to human induced stress, such as climate change, what effects these changes have on the coral host and how these responses of the alga effect the future of coral reefs as we know them.
Aerial surveys of the northern Great Barrier Reef during the 2016 coral bleaching event
 
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This footage shows extensive coral bleaching (white/yellow patches) on the northern Great Barrier Reef as seen from the helicopter during scientific aerial surveys in March 2016. MORE INFORMATION BELOW. On 29th March 2016, aerial surveys of more than 500 coral reefs from Cairns to Papua New Guinea revealed that the most pristine section of the Great Barrier Reef experienced the worst mass bleaching event in its history, with the overwhelming majority of reefs being ranked in the most severe bleaching category. The surveys were conducted by Prof Terry Hughes from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, convenor of the National Coral Bleaching Taskforce, and James Kerry, project manager of the taskforce. Footage is free to use for editorial purposes but MUST be credited ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies / James Kerry. --- What is coral bleaching? How does it affect the Great Barrier Reef? http://www.coralcoe.org.au/resources/for-managers/coral-bleaching-and-the-great-barrier-reef --- Hot news on the 2016 coral bleaching event: 20 April 2016: Only 7% of the Great Barrier Reef has avoided coral bleaching http://www.coralcoe.org.au/media-releases/only-7-of-the-great-barrier-reef-has-avoided-coral-bleaching 15 April 2016: Great Barrier Reef risks losing tolerance to bleaching events http://www.coralcoe.org.au/media-releases/great-barrier-reef-risks-losing-tolerance-to-bleaching-events 05 April 2016: National Coral Taskforce unleashes an armada of experts http://www.coralcoe.org.au/media-releases/national-coral-taskforce-unleashes-an-armada-of-experts 29 March 2016: Coral Bleaching Taskforce documents most severe bleaching on record http://www.coralcoe.org.au/media-releases/coral-bleaching-taskforce-documents-most-severe-bleaching-on-record 21 March 2016: Scientist witnesses severe coral bleaching http://www.coralcoe.org.au/media-releases/scientist-witnesses-severe-coral-bleaching 14 March 2016: National Coral Taskforce puts plan into effect as bleaching intensifies http://www.coralcoe.org.au/media-releases/national-coral-taskforce-puts-plan-into-effect-as-bleaching-intensifies 01 March 2016: National Coral Bleaching Taskforce keeping a close watch on the Reef http://www.coralcoe.org.au/media-releases/national-coral-bleaching-taskforce-keeping-a-close-watch-on-the-reef
Garry Russ - Marine reserves, fisheries management and environmental disturbances on coral reefs
 
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Seminar title: Marine reserves, fisheries management and environmental disturbances on coral reefs Presented by: Garry Russ Date: Tuesday Friday 4th July 2014 Seminar type: CoralCoE symposium Presentation given at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies 2014 Symposium: The Future of Coral Reefs. Biography: Garry is a Chief Investigator in the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies and a Professor in Marine Biology at James Cook University. Garry studies the biology of reef fish of commercial and recreational fishing significance. A major area of his applied research involves population and community dynamics of reef fish of commercial significance. In the Coral Triangle region and Australia, he is undertaking long-term (25 year) studies of reef fish populations inside and outside marine reserves. Garry has published over 75 papers in international journals. In 1999, he received a prestigious Pew Fellowship in Marine Conservation jointly with his long-time colleague Dr Angel Alcala.
Laurence McCook - The Great Barrier Reef as a globally significant demonstration of the [...]
 
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Seminar title: The Great Barrier Reef as a globally significant demonstration of the benefits of zoning and adaptive management Presented by: Laurence McCook Date: Tuesday Friday 4th July 2014 Seminar type: CoralCoE symposium Presentation given at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies 2014 Symposium: The Future of Coral Reefs. Biography: Dr Laurence McCook manages ecosystem health and resilience for the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority, and has been responsible for the strategic coordination of the scientific information needed to protect the Great Barrier Reef. Laurence has extensive scientific experience, including the ecological processes underlying coral reef resilience and degradation and the effects of marine reserve networks. He has strong interests in the application of science to environmental management, including public perceptions of scientific uncertainty, burden of proof, shifting baselines, and the interface between environmental and economic values. In 2005, Laurence was awarded an international Pew Fellowship in Marine Conservation, focused on the resilience of coral reefs under climate change, and has recently run a series of workshops on coral reef management for reef managers and communities across Indonesia.
Jeremy Jackson -  Good governance and regulations increase Caribbean coral reef resilience
 
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Seminar title: Good governance and regulations increase Caribbean coral reef resilience Presented by: Jeremy Jackson Date: Tuesday 6th October 2015 Seminar type: CoralCoE symposium Presentation given at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies 2015 symposium "Future of Marine Ecosystems". Bio: Jeremy is Senior Scientist Emeritus at the Smithsonian Institution, Professor of Oceanography Emeritus at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, and Director of the Global Coral Reef Monitoring Network. He studies the ecology and evolution of ocean ecosystems and the impacts of human activities on ocean ecosystem services and human wellbeing. Jackson is author of some 175 scientific publications including 24 in Science and Nature and author or editor of ten books. He is a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and has received a dozen prizes and awards including the BBVA International Prize in Ecology and Conservation, The Paleontological Medal, and the Darwin Medal of the International Society for Reef Studies. Jackson’s work on historical overfishing and the collapse of coastal ecosystems was chosen by Discover magazine as the outstanding scientific achievement of 2001. His most recent book is Shifting Baselines: The Past and Future of Ocean Fisheries.
Fishes, functions and the future of coral reefs - Prof David Bellwood
 
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Can Rabbitfishes save the Caribbean? Prof David Bellwood is looking at a new (warmer) world and it will involve fish species movement. Rabbitfishes moving to the Caribbean will bring positives as well as unknownn. He asks "How do fish function in their underwater world? We need to look at the function of fish and their impacts on the reef after coral bleaching."
Catastrophic bleaching in northern Great Barrier Reef
 
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Scientist James Kerry speaks to BBC World News about the number of corals killed by bleaching on the Great Barrier Reef.
David Miller - Probing coral immunity based on genomics and transcriptomics
 
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Seminar title: Probing coral immunity based on genomics and transcriptomics Presented by: David Miller Date: 20-21th October 2011 Seminar type: CoralCoE symposium Presentation given at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies 2011 symposium "Coral Reefs: Coast to Coast". Bio: David Miller is a program leader at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies. His work is aimed at understanding how corals and the coral holobiont (the coral animal and its associated symbionts and bacteria) function at the molecular level. Major advances in DNA sequencing technology over the last few years mean that these are now realistic and achievable goals. David's laboratory and those of his collaborators have pioneered the use of Acropora millepora as a model coral for gene expression analysis, enabling substantial advances to be made in understanding some general principles of coral biology. The coral genome has also provided some remarkable and surprising insights into the general principles of development and genome evolution in the animal kingdom.
David Bellwood - The nature of change: learning lessons from the past
 
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Seminar title: The nature of change: learning lessons from the past Presented by: David Bellwood Date: 20-21th October 2011 Seminar type: CoralCoE symposium Presentation given at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies 2011 symposium "Coral Reefs: Coast to Coast". Bio: Professor David Bellwood is a Chief Investigator in the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies and a Professor in the School of Marine and Tropical Biology at James Cook University. He has broad research interests in the evolution and ecology of coral reef fishes, with over 130 articles in leading international journals. Through a series of influential papers (eight in Science and Nature), he has pioneered the application of ecosystem function approaches to the study of reef fishes and in the evaluation of ecosystem impacts of biodiversity. In the last few years his primary goal has been to identify critical functional groups and the key reef processes that underpin coral reef resilience.
Jon Day - Lessons learnt for protecting the environment, biodiversity and heritage values of [...]
 
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Seminar title: Lessons learnt for protecting the environment, biodiversity and heritage values of the Great Barrier Reef Presented by: Jon Day Date: 10-11th October 2013 Seminar type: CoralCoE symposium Presentation given at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies 2013 Symposium "Coral Reefs in the 21st Century" Bio: Jon has 39 years of professional experience as a natural protected area planner and manager (both terrestrial and marine), 28 years of which has been in the Great Barrier Reef (GBR) Marine Park. Jon joined GBRMPA in 1986, and had a variety of roles over the years including field management, planning and world heritage. Between 1998-2003, Jon was the Director responsible for the Representative Areas Program (RAP), the major rezoning program undertaken for the entire GBR. The systematic marine planning approach developed during RAP is today widely considered as ‘world’s best practice’ and has received eleven national and international awards. For his efforts with RAP, Jon was awarded an Australian Public Service Medal and a Smithsonian-Queensland Fellowship. Jon has published widely on MPA management and planning, as well as on world heritage matters, and was appointed as one of Australia’s representatives on the World Heritage Committee from 2007-11.
Bob Pressey - Marine conservation planning in the Coral Triangle: 30 years of research meets [...]
 
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Seminar title: Marine conservation planning in the Coral Triangle: 30 years of research meets socio-political realities Presented by: Bob Pressey Date: 20-21th October 2011 Seminar type: CoralCoE symposium Presentation given at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies 2011 symposium "Coral Reefs: Coast to Coast". Bio: Professor Bob Pressey is a Program Leader in the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies. His research includes aspects of spatial data sets on biodiversity, geographic information systems, software development, and the socio-economic issues involved in implementing conservation action. During almost 20 years as a research scientist for the NSW National Parks and Wildlife Service he developed and applied leading-edge techniques in conservation planning, influenced policy and conservation practice, and began a long series of international collaborations. In 2002 he was awarded The Royal Botanic Gardens' Eureka Prize for Biodiversity Research. In 2008 he was awarded the inaugural Australian Ecology Research Award from the Ecological Society of Australia. His most recent recognition is being elected in 2010 as a Fellow to the Australian Academy of Science.
Pim Bongaerts - Mesophotic coral ecosystems: insights from molecular ecology
 
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Seminar title: Mesophotic coral ecosystems: insights from molecular ecology Presented by: Pim Bongaerts Date: Wednesday 7th October 2015 Seminar type: CoralCoE symposium Presentation given at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies 2015 symposium "Future of Marine Ecosystems". Bio: Pim is the lead scientist on the Deep Reef component of the Catlin Seaview Survey and a research fellow on the DSITIA Accelerate Partnership Grant “Coral genomes along environmental gradients”. He uses next-generation sequencing approaches to study the biodiversity and connectivity of mesophotic reefs across the globe, with a major focus on the Great Barrier Reef, the Coral Sea and the Southern Caribbean. After completing a PhD at UQ in 2011, he completed a one-year post-doctoral fellowship at the School of Biological Sciences (UQ) based at the Heron Island Research Station.
Peter Mumby - High resilience masks the sensitivity of Pacific reefs to algal phase shifts
 
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Seminar title: High resilience masks the sensitivity of Pacific reefs to algal phase shifts Presented by: Peter Mumby Date: Tuesday 6th October 2015 Seminar type: CoralCoE symposium Presentation given at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies 2015 symposium "Future of Marine Ecosystems". Bio: Peter is a Chief Investigator in the ARC Centre of Excellence. He is a reef ecologist and uses both experimental and modelling approaches to answer questions about the functioning of coral reefs and the influence of management. His current research focuses on ecosystem resilience, processes influencing coral recovery, ecosystem-based fisheries, MPA network design, and the management of ecosystem services. Peter is a Pew Fellow of Marine Conservation and holder of an ARC Laureate Fellowship. In 2015, the International Society for Reef Studies awarded him a Fellowship and inaugural ‘Mid Career Scientist’ award in recognition of contributions to reef science in the last decade. Peter is happiest underwater.
Christopher Doropoulos - Post-disturbance coral reef dynamics: a coral recruit perspective
 
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Seminar title: Post-disturbance coral reef dynamics: a coral recruit perspective. Presented by: Christopher Doropoulos Date: Thursday 3 July 2014 Seminar type: CoralCoE symposium Presentation given at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies 2014 Symposium: The Future of Coral Reefs. Biography: Christopher has been working as a Postdoctoral Research Fellow with Peter Mumby at The University of Queensland since 2013. He is a marine ecologist whose work focuses on benthic algal and invertebrate recruitment and species interactions in shallow reef environments, and how these are affected by chronic and acute stress. His PhD, completed at The University of Queensland in 2012, investigated how ocean acidification altered species interactions during the pre- and post-settlement coral recruitment phase; and, how functional traits of recruiting and juvenile coral assemblages influence early recovery trajectories. Christopher is now investigating the trade-offs that determine early recruitment success in corals, using a combination of observational, experimental, and modelling approaches.
Louisa Evans - The potential for adaptive co-management of small-scale fisheries in the [...]
 
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Seminar title: The potential for adaptive co-management of small-scale fisheries in the developing world Presented by: Louisa Evans Date: 7-8th October 2010 Seminar type: CoralCoE symposium Presentation given at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies 2010: Coral Reefs in a Changing Environment. Bio: Louisa is a social scientist with interests in governance of marine systems in developing countries. Her PhD, completed through the University of East Anglia (UK), used institutional analysis and political ecology to explore issues of inclusion, knowledge and complexity in marine social-ecological systems in Kenya. Following this, Louisa moved to the WorldFish Center in Malaysia to continue work in resilience thinking and how these concepts can be applied to small-scale fisheries in the developing world. Louisa has recently started as a postdoctoral fellow at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies looking primarily at integrating resilience and other systems approaches with human development perspectives to understand and develop governance approaches that are better at addressing the synergies and trade-offs between poverty reduction, adaptation strategies and ecological sustainability.
Ove Hoegh Guldberg - Climate change in the ocean - the big picture?
 
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Seminar title: Climate Change in the ocean – the big picture? Presented by: Ove Hoegh-Guldberg Date: 10-11th October 2013 Seminar type: CoralCoE symposium Presentation given at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies 2013 Symposium "Coral Reefs in the 21st Century" Bio: Ove is a Deputy Director in the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, Director of the Global Change Institute at the University of Queensland, and an Australian Laureate Fellow (2013-2018). His research interests span a broad range of topics including marine biology, evolution, physiology, biochemistry and molecular biology of plant-animal symbioses, co-evolution, coral bleaching and climate change. Ove was elected as a Fellow of the Australian Academy of Science in 2013 and has published over 200 papers, including 16 in Science and Nature. He is reviewing editor at Science Magazine.
Garry Russ - Why do we have a Great Barrier Reef Marine Park?
 
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Seminar title: Why do we have a Great Barrier Reef Marine Park? Presented by: Garry Russ Seminar type: Public forum Presentation given at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies 2009 public forum "Securing coral reef futures". Abstract: Multiple-use marine parks, particularly those that incorporate no-take zones, aim to conserve and restore marine ecosystems. The Great Barrier Reef is an Australian and an international icon. The Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Act was passed in 1975, with much of the park in place by the mid-1980's. In 2004 the park was re-zoned into the largest network of marine no-take areas in the world. This network was called the Representative Areas Program (RAP) and aimed to conserve all major bioregions of the Great Barrier Reef. The presentation will briefly reflect on why we have a Great Barrier Reef Marine Park. Bio: Professor Garry Russ is Leader of Program 3 (Marine Reserves and Connectivity) in the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies at James Cook University. Garry received a prestigious Pew Fellowship in Marine Conservation (1999-2002) jointly with long-term colleague AC Alcala. Garry is one of only three Australian-born scientists to receive this award.
Counting the invisible - Dr Danika Kleiber
 
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Dr Danika Keliber's main points: 1. Feminism can improve fisheries science. 2. Women fish all over the world "Feminism is really good at pointing out that women are missing in our data. It can help us to reframe our research."
Sylvain Foret - The Australian Coral Genome Project
 
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Seminar title: The Australian Coral Genome Project Presented by: Sylvain Foret Date: 20-21th October 2011 Seminar type: CoralCoE symposium Presentation given at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies 2011 symposium "Coral Reefs: Coast to Coast". Bio: Dr Foret's work gravitates around the area of genomics and bioinformatics, where he has developed both applied and theoretical interests. His theoretical work draws from the fields of statistics and computer science, and is motivated by the analysis of biological sequences, phylogenetic inference and gene expression data analysis. His biological research has been driven by his interest in the evolution of invertebrates. In particular, he has worked on the molecular bases of chemical communication, the evolution of development (evo-devo) and epigenetics, both in insects and corals.
Prof. Josh Cinner Bright Spots Promotional Video
 
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Professor Cinner's research aims to help solve the global problem of unsustainable coral reef fisheries by locating and learning from ‘bright spots’– reefs with more fish than expected, based on their exposure to pressures such as human population, poverty and unfavourable environmental conditions. Read more: https://goo.gl/9R7KXY Video by Cinematic Science: http://cinematicscience.com/
Garry Russ - Do green zones work? Countering the coral trout of doubt
 
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Seminar title: Do green zones work? Countering the coral trout of doubt Presented by: Garry Russ Seminar type: Public forum Presentation given at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies 2013 evening Forum: Coral Reefs in the 21st Century
Dr Peter Cowman - "The phylogenetic history of coral reef biodiversity..."
 
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Award-winning DECRA researcher, Dr Cowman is a self-declared 'phylogenetic fanatic!" Find out why, here.
Geoff Jones - Do marine reserves enhance important coral reef fisheries?
 
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Seminar title: Do marine reserves enhance important coral reef fisheries? Presented by: Geoff Jones Date: 7-8th October 2010 Seminar type: CoralCoE symposium Presentation given at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies 2010: Coral Reefs in a Changing Environment. Bio: Geoffrey P Jones (PhD, Univ. of Auckland 1980) is currently a Professor in the School of Marine and Tropical Biology, and ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, James Cook University. His general field of research is in marine conservation biology, with primary expertise in the ecology, behaviour and conservation of tropical and temperate reef fishes. His most recent research centres on dispersal, habitat specialization, habitat change and strategies for conserving reef biodiversity. He has published over 140 scientific articles and supervised over 100 graduate students in this field.
Rocky de Nys - A role for aquaculture in ecosystem restoration?
 
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Seminar title: A role for aquaculture in ecosystem restoration? Presented by: Rocky de Nys Date: 18-19th October 2007 Seminar type: CoralCoE symposium Presentation given at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies 2007 symposium "Coral reef futures". Bio: Professor Rocky de Nys is the Head of Aquaculture at James Cook University. His research, and that of the team within aquaculture, focuses on the sustainable development of aquaculture in the tropics. This includes the increased productivity of developed aquaculture industries, the development of new industries, and the implementation and extension of industries into developing countries, so that they can be economically and socially profitable, as well as environmentally responsible. Rocky has an extensive research background across a range of aquaculture and marine biotechnology fields with both academic and industry experience.
Garry Russ - Networks of marine reserves as fisheries management and conservation tools on [...]
 
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Seminar title: Networks of marine reserves as fisheries management and conservation tools on coral reefs Presented by: Garry Russ Date: 20-21th October 2011 Seminar type: CoralCoE symposium Presentation given at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies 2011 symposium "Coral Reefs: Coast to Coast". Bio: Professor Garry Russ is Leader of Program 3 (Marine Reserves and Connectivity) in the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies and a Professor in Marine Biology at James Cook University. Garry studies the biology of reef fish of commercial and recreational fishing significance. A major area of his applied research involves population and community dynamics of reef fish of commercial significance. In the Coral Triangle region and Australia, he is undertaking long-term (25 year) studies of reef fish populations inside and outside marine reserves. Garry has published over 75 papers in international journals. In 1999, he received a prestigious Pew Fellowship in Marine Conservation jointly with his long-time colleague Dr. Angel Alcala.
Sylvain Foret - The coral immune system: weapon of mass destruction or musical instrument?
 
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Seminar title: The coral immune system: weapon of mass destruction or musical instrument? Presented by: Sylvain Foret Seminar type: Public forum Presentation given at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies 2013 evening Forum: Coral Reefs in the 21st Century
CoralCoE scientists assess coral bleaching damage on Great Barrier Reef
 
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Scientists from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies talk to 7 News Townsville about the health of the Great Barrier Reef from coral bleaching.
A/Prof Maja Adamska - "Whole body regeneration in sponges: cellular and molecular mechanisms"
 
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If you didn't think sponges were cool before, A/Prof Adamska will change your mind.
Prof Terry Hughes - "Coral Reefs in the Anthropocene"
 
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Prof Hughes delivers the opening presentation of the annual meeting of ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, "Coral Reef Futures Symposium" held at the Shine Dome in Canberra, ACT Australia on June 15, 2017.
Geoff Jones - Marine reserves, habitat change and connectivity
 
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Seminar title: Marine reserves, habitat change and connectivity Presented by: Geoff Jones Date: 10-11th October 2013 Seminar type: CoralCoE symposium Presentation given at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies 2013 Symposium "Coral Reefs in the 21st Century" Bio: Geoff is a Professor in the School of Marine and Tropical Biology and a member of the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies at James Cook University. He is one of the world’s most cited authors in the fields of coral reef ecology and marine conservation biology, with over 160 refereed scientific publications in peer-reviewed journals and books. His special interests are in the processes determining the structure and dynamics of reef fish populations, and strategies to reduce human impacts on threatened fish species. Jones and collaborators were the first to tag and recapture marine fish larvae. He has since become a world leader in the field of marine population connectivity and its implications for the ecology, conservation and management of reef fish populations.
Joana Figueiredo - Coral dispersal dynamics: new insights into patterns of connectivity
 
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Seminar title: Coral dispersal dynamics: new insights into patterns of connectivity Presented by: Joana Figueiredo Date: 10-11th October 2013 Seminar type: CoralCoE symposium Presentation given at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies 2013 Symposium "Coral Reefs in the 21st Century" Bio: Joana grew up in Lisbon, Portugal. She completed a B.Sc. with Honours in Marine Biology in 2003, a Post-Graduation in Statistics Applied to Biology and Health Sciences in 2005, and a Ph.D. in Marine Sciences in 2009, at the University of Lisbon. Joana is a larval ecologist with a special interest in marine invertebrates. She uses a combination of empirical studies and mathematical modelling to understand how environmental conditions determine important ecological processes such as dispersal and recruitment of marine invertebrates. Her current research focused on the early life-history of a range of Indo-Pacific coral species and its implications for coral dispersal and metapopulation connectivity. She also aims to predict how the dispersal and connectivity of coral populations will be affected by natural and/or human-induced disturbances. A better understanding of coral dispersal patterns, and how they might change with global warming, is essential to assist the design of effective marine reserve networks.
Michael Berumen - Connectivity patterns in Red Sea coral reefs
 
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Seminar title: Connectivity patterns in Red Sea coral reefs Presented by: Michael Berumen Date: 10-11th October 2013 Seminar type: CoralCoE symposium Presentation given at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies 2013 Symposium "Coral Reefs in the 21st Century" Bio: Michael is Assistant Professor of Marine Science at King Abdullah University of Science and Technolgy in Saudi Arabia and leads the Reef Ecology lab in the Red Sea Research Center. His research focuses on a range of coral reef taxa. Michael’s research interests are focused on coral reef ecology, including larval connectivity in coral reef fishes, movement ecology of coral reef organisms, biogeography and the impact of climate change on coral reef ecosystems. These projects utilize techniques ranging from simple in-situ observations to parentage analysis using DNA microsatellite markers. He is part of an international team developing techniques used to track the dispersal patterns of larval fish and is leading one of the world’s largest whale shark tagging and tracking programs.
Terry Hughes - Securing the future of the Great Barrier Reef
 
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Terry Hughes, ARC CoE for Coral Reef Studies Director raises awareness of the untapped opportunities to incorporate science into better policy to ensure we still have a magnificent Great Barrier Reef in the future.
Ove Hoegh-Guldberg - Evolution of coral reef biodiversity under rapid climate change. Real or [...]
 
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Seminar title: Evolution of coral reef biodiversity under rapid climate change. Real or improbable? Presented by: Ove Hoegh-Guldberg Date: 20-21th October 2011 Seminar type: Public forum Presentation given at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies 2011 public forum "Coral Reefs: Coast to Coast". Abstract: The current rate of environmental change is among the highest for thousands if not millions of years. The big question is, will evolution step in and save the coral reefs like the Great Barrier Reef? Ove will explore this question using data from past and present to illustrate the risk that the biodiversity of our great coral reefs may be left in the dust of a rapidly changing climate. Bio: Professor Ove Hoegh-Guldberg is a Deputy Director in the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, Director of the Global Change Institute at the University of Queensland, and a Queensland Premier's Smart State Fellow (2008-2013). His research interests span a broad range of topics including marine biology, evolution, physiology, biochemistry and molecular biology of plant-animal symbioses, co-evolution, coral bleaching and climate change. Ove has published over 200 papers, including 18 in Science or Nature. He is reviewing editor at Science Magazine.
Luke Smith - The fall and rise of Western Australia’s largest offshore coral reef, Scott Reef
 
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Seminar title: The fall and rise of Western Australia’s largest offshore coral reef, Scott Reef Presented by: Luke Smith Date: 20-21th October 2011 Seminar type: CoralCoE symposium Presentation given at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies 2011 symposium "Coral Reefs: Coast to Coast". Bio: Luke Smith is the Principal Environmental Scientist at Woodside Energy. He has a coral reef ecology background and his current research interests focus on the science of impact assessment and management of tropical marine ecosystems. In recent years, he has also focussed on understanding migration pathways and residence times of marine mammals and reptiles within Western Australia.