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Видео добавленное пользователем “BLMOREGON”
Becoming a Wildland Firefighter
 
06:19
Take this behind the scenes tour of firefighting school and know what every wildland firefighter goes through before picking up a shovel.
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What goes in a firefighter's "line" pack?
 
02:06
Have you noticed the bulge on the back of every wildland firefighter wearing the "Nomex" uniform? Carried by every firefighter, this "line pack" has the essentials for staying fit on the line for extended times.
Просмотров: 14711 BLMOREGON
Oct/Nov 2017 Wild Horse Adoption
 
04:58
https://www.blm.gov/adoptahorse/ Oregon's Wild Horse Corral Facility in Hines, Oregon, prepares all horses from the range for adoption. Before adopted horses and burros are shipped from the facility, they are given a final brand and health inspection by a veterinarian. The next Internet Adoption will start on October 31 and end on November 18. Applications are open October 23 through November 10: https://on.doi.gov/2katUkr More information about the BLM corral in Burns: https://on.doi.gov/1BifXU8 If you are interested in adopting a wild horse or burro or taking a tour, please visit the corral facility, stop by the BLM office at 28910 Highway 20 West in Hines, or give us a call at (541) 573-4400.
Просмотров: 34398 BLMOREGON
Oregon Wild Horse Adoption, June 2017
 
04:15
https://www.blm.gov/adoptahorse/ Oregon's Wild Horse Corral Facility in Hines, Oregon, prepares all horses from the range for adoption. Before adopted horses and burros are shipped from the facility, they are given a final brand and health inspection by a veterinarian. The June Internet Adoption will start on June 6 and end on June 20. Applications are open now through June 16: https://on.doi.gov/2katUkr More information about the BLM corral in Burns: https://on.doi.gov/1BifXU8 If you are interested in adopting a wild horse or burro or taking a tour, please visit the corral facility, stop by the BLM office at 28910 Highway 20 West in Hines, or give us a call at (541) 573-4400.
Просмотров: 35590 BLMOREGON
The Horse Whisperer
 
04:01
Professional horse trainer and instructor, Elsa Sinclair talks about her love of mustangs and her new project of training a truly wild horse without the use of traditional tools.
Просмотров: 3947 BLMOREGON
How to Load and Fire a Flintlock Rifle
 
05:10
Famous Oregon Trail guide Joe Meek (played by BLM Park Ranger Jeremy Martin) shows how to load and fire a flintlock rifle. To learn more about Joe, and this fascinating little piece of America's history, watch his full video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UH9kvMtUw6g How to visit the Oregon Trail center in Baker City: https://www.blm.gov/learn/interpretive-centers/national-historic-oregon-trail-interpretive-center
Просмотров: 40651 BLMOREGON
Oregon Wild Horse Adoption, July 2017
 
05:17
https://www.blm.gov/adoptahorse/ Oregon's Wild Horse Corral Facility in Hines, Oregon, prepares all horses from the range for adoption. Before adopted horses and burros are shipped from the facility, they are given a final brand and health inspection by a veterinarian. The July Internet Adoption will start on July 18 and end on August 1. Applications will be open July 9 through July 28: https://on.doi.gov/2katUkr More information about the BLM corral in Burns: https://on.doi.gov/1BifXU8 If you are interested in adopting a wild horse or burro or taking a tour, please visit the corral facility, stop by the BLM office at 28910 Highway 20 West in Hines, or give us a call at (541) 573-4400.
Просмотров: 49644 BLMOREGON
Wild horse online adoption, June 2018
 
15:20
The Oregon wild horse auction is live now! There are more than 50 horses from the South Steens herd available. See all the beautiful horses and place a bid before June 26! 🐴📲 The horses from southeast Oregon average anywhere from 14 to 16 hands in size and from 900-1,200 pounds. Their color also varies, from pinto to buckskin, sorrel, bay, palomino, brown and black. Oregon's Wild Horse Corral Facility in Hines, Oregon, prepares all horses from the range for adoption. Before horses and burros are shipped from the facility, they are given a final brand and health inspection by a veterinarian. All horses start out with a $125 bid. Horses can be picked up from several locations across the country: Ewing, Illinois; Pauls Valley, Oklahoma; Elm Creek, Nebraska; Hines, Oregon; Kansas City, Kansas; Swanzey, New Hampshire; and Columbia, South Carolina. See all the individual horse pages and sign up to adopt today: https://wildhorsesonline.blm.gov/Auction If you have any questions, call 1-800-370-3936 or email blm_es_inet_adoption@blm.gov Or you can contact the BLM Oregon corral: 541-573-4400 Related content: 🛫 America’s wild horses arrive in Germany: goo.gl/8G9Nty 📸 More photos of Oregon wild horses: https://goo.gl/RizvJ3
Просмотров: 82661 BLMOREGON
Climbing Pilot Rock
 
07:12
This video shows you how to get to Pilot Rock in southern Oregon (in BLM's Medford District), and how to climb to the top of it. Most importantly it shows you how to get back down! For more information, visit www.blm.gov/or/resources/recreation/site_info.php?siteid=351 Pilot Rock is in the BLM's Cascade Siskiyou National Monument. Located at the crossroads of the Cascade, Klamath, and Siskiyou mountain ranges, scientists have long recognized the outstanding ecological values of the Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument (CSNM). The convergence of three geologically distinct mountain ranges resulted in an area with remarkable biological diversity and a tremendously varied landscape. Many archaeological and historical sites are also found throughout the CSNM, providing clues to Native American use of the area and tracing portions of the historic Oregon/California Trail. Some of the best ways to explore this unique landscape include visiting the Hyatt Lake Recreation Complex and hiking on the Pacific Crest National Scenic Trail (PCT). The CSNM consists of approximately 54,000 acres of BLM-administered land in rugged Southwestern Oregon. Privately owned land is often adjacent to public land in the CSNM. Please respect the rights of private property owners and stay on public land when visiting the monument.
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Oregon Wild Horse Adoption, August 2016
 
05:20
https://www.blm.gov/adoptahorse/ Oregon's Wild Horse Corral Facility in Hines, Oregon, prepares all horses from the range for adoption. Before adopted horses and burros are shipped away from the facility, they are given a final brand and health inspection by a veterinarian. The Oregon wild horses in this video are set to be available via the August Internet Adoption, starting August 30 and ending on September 13. Applications are open August 29 through September 12: https://www.blm.gov/adoptahorse/onlinegallery.php?horseCategory=641 More information about the BLM corral in Burns: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/burns/wildhorse/corral.php. If you are interested in adopting a wild horse or burro or taking a tour, please visit the corral facility, stop by the BLM office at 28910 Highway 20 West in Hines, or give us a call at (541) 573-4400.
Просмотров: 13008 BLMOREGON
Camping: The 10 Essentials (plus other tips!)
 
03:58
Make your next outdoor hiking or camping experience a success by knowing what to bring. Throughout Oregon and Washington, the BLM has hundreds of campsites, hiking trails, fishing holes, lakes and rivers for boating, and land for hunting. Regardless of your recreational interests, the BLM wants you to be safe and know the 10 essentials. Enjoy America's Great Outdoors! In addition to the 10 essentials, this video also offers a numbers of helpful tips regarding things to consider, and situations to be aware of in the outdoors.
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Steens Mountain Wilderness
 
02:58
The United States Congress designated the Steens Mountain Wilderness in 2000 and it now has over a total of 170,166 acres. All of this wilderness is located in Oregon and is managed by the Bureau of Land Management. Steens Mountain is located in Oregon's high desert is one of the crown jewels of the state's wildlands. It is some of the wildest and most remote land left in Oregon. The Bureau of Land Management's National Conservation Lands, also known as the National Landscape Conservation System, contain some of the West's most spectacular landscapes. It includes over 886 federally recognized areas and approximately 27 million acres that include Wilderness areas. With the passage of the Omnibus Public Land Act in March 2009, the BLM now manages eight Wilderness Areas across nearly 247,000 acres in Oregon. The BLM also manages one Wilderness Area in Washington covering 7,142 acres. In addition, the BLM currently protects wilderness values on 82 Wilderness Study Areas (WSA) and five Instant Study Areas in Oregon totaling more than 2.6 million acres and one WSA in Washington totaling 5,557 acres. Wilderness is Congressionally-designated piece land that is managed in accordance with the Wilderness Act of 1964 to "...secure for the American people of present and future generations the benefits of an enduring resource of wilderness." Wilderness areas are places where natural processes take precedent; areas managed so that nature remains substantially unchanged by human use. Rugged trails provide the only access into wilderness, and travel is restricted to foot or horseback. This map will allow you to plan your trip, navigate the wilderness, and enjoy its solitude and splendor. Before you head out to this area be sure you know how to use a map and compass. To learn a little more about map and compass navigation check out our video on YouTube: www.youtube.com/watch?v=D6pIxovHLYM
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Loading a single-engine air tanker with wildfire retardant
 
01:50
Single-engine air tankers, or SEATs as they are called in the wildfire industry, are an integral part of firefighting. As seen in previous videos, they can pinpoint drop retardant to save structures or lives. Speed is the key, and at the airport in Ontario, Oregon, crews can reload a SEAT with 800 gallons of retardant in about 4 minutes. SEAT drop in eastern Oregon: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5H5OrfdMlXQ Video from Aug. 14, 2015: Larry Moore, BLM Vale
Просмотров: 2416 BLMOREGON
Oregon Cascade Siskiyou National Monument
 
02:02
Located at the crossroads of the Cascade, Klamath, and Siskiyou mountain ranges, scientists have long recognized the outstanding ecological values of the Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument (CSNM). The convergence of three geologically distinct mountain ranges resulted in an area with remarkable biological diversity and a tremendously varied landscape. Many archaeological and historical sites are also found throughout the CSNM, providing clues to Native American use of the area and tracing portions of the historic Oregon/California Trail. Some of the best ways to explore this unique landscape include visiting the Hyatt Lake Recreation Complex and hiking on the Pacific Crest National Scenic Trail (PCT). Follow the links below for more info: http://www.blm.gov/or/resources/recreation/csnm/ http://www.blm.gov/or/resources/recreation/csnm/csnm-hyatt.php http://www.blm.gov/or/resources/recreation/csnm/csnm-pct.php
Просмотров: 4154 BLMOREGON
Travels with "Eb"...
 
05:03
M.J. Eberhart goes by the handle “Nimblewill Nomad” on the trail. Depending on who you talk to he also goes by “Sunny” or “Eb.” He’s hiked all 11 National Scenic Trails—that’s a total of nearly 19,000 miles. His exploits don’t stop there. He’s walked countless smaller trails over the course of his career, including the Lewis and Clark National Historic Trail several times. That’s 4,600 miles one way. Now he’s walking the Oregon Trail, a paltry 2,200 miles compared to his prior achievements. What makes his story more extraordinary is that he didn’t take up hiking until his retirement from a 30 year career as a doctor of optometry in the early 1980s. Eberthart is 76 years old. Eberhart says he’s often asked why he does it. “Just because,” he says with a laugh. “At my age, you start to lose your passion,” Eberhart says. He spent 20 years helping to restore the sight of people suffering with cataracts, “that brought me joy,” he says. With his career far behind him, he says it’s the trail that keeps his passion alive. When pressed however, Eberhart, also a published author and poet, closes his eyes and gives a more poetic response. “It’s the people, the places, the pain and the trials. It’s the joy and the blessings that come with the miles. It’s a calling gone out to a fortunate few, to wander the fringes of God’s hazy blue” Eberhart doesn’t own a house, but he’ll tell you that he has a home. “I have a pickup, I toss a mattress in the back and I’ll find one of the national parks and stay there until I have to move on.” He says the Park Service and Bureau of Land Management are to thank for making his treks and nomadic lifestyle possible. “I have had such a beautiful experience,” Eberhart says. “We can attribute that good fortune that those places exist and are being maintained to the Bureau of Land Management.” As for the future, Eberhart can only speculate. He says his body isn’t what it used to be, and pain in his left foot along this journey has nearly brought him to tears on more than one occasion. Still, this self-described country boy from Missouri’s Ozark Mountains has always felt more at home outdoors than anywhere else. “My granddaddy died in the woods, my daddy died in the woods,” he says with a smile, “and I’m working on it.” To learn more about the Oregon Trail, head on over to the National Oregon Trail Interpretive Center: www.blm.gov/or/oregontrail/index.php To learn more about Eb's travels head on over to: http://www.nimblewillnomad.com/
Просмотров: 1359 BLMOREGON
Riding the Steens Mountain Loop Road
 
01:29
The Steens Mountain area offers an extraordinary landscape of volcanic uplifts, deep glacier-carved gorges, stunning scenery, wilderness, wild rivers, and a rich diversity of plant and animal species. The 52-mile Steens Mountain Backcountry Byway provides access to four campgrounds and the views from Kiger Gorge, East Rim, Big Indian Gorge, Wildhorse and Little Blitzen Gorge overlooks are not to be missed! Plan your next trip here! www.blm.gov/or/districts/burns/recreation/steens-mtn.php
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Oregon wild horse adoption, June 2016
 
05:14
Every year, Oregon's Wild Horse Corral Facility in Burns prepares horses from the range for adoption. Before adopted horses and burros are shipped away from the facility, they are given a final brand and health inspection by a veterinarian. The Oregon wild horses in this video are set to be available via internet adoption, which starts on June 7: https://www.blm.gov/adoptahorse/onlinegallery.php?horseCategory=641 More information about the BLM corral in Burns: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/burns/wildhorse/corral.php If you are interested in adopting a wild horse or burro or taking a tour, please visit the corral facility, stop by the BLM office at 28910 Highway 20 West in Hines, or give us a call at (541) 573-4400.
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Oregon BLM Horse Adoption Program
 
05:07
The Bureau of Land Management, in an effort to improve conditions for existing wild mustang herds, and in partnership with state wide contributors, has developed the Wild Horse Adoption Program. Annual events and auctions are held all over Oregon and Washington. To find out more, go to http://www.blm.gov/wo/st/en/prog/wild_horse_and_burro.html
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Steens Mountain: A Brief History
 
02:26
Here is a brief history about the beautiful Steens Mountain area that encompasses an extraordinary landscape with deep glacier carved gorges, stunning scenery, wilderness, wild rivers, a rich diversity of plant and animal species, and a way of life for all who live there.
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Trainer Incentive Program: The bond between trainer, wild horse
 
02:10
Making wild horses adoptable – even if it’s hard to say goodbye – is the main goal of the Trainer Incentive Program. Speaking about her latest wild horse trainee, pumpkin, trainer Becky Seibel said it’s always hard to say goodbye to her horses. “Each time, you know, you put a lot of yourself into them -- a little piece of my heart will go with her,” said Seibel, who has trained about 20 BLM mustangs. All five mustangs up for adoption at an event in central Washington last week were adopted. Video by Jeff Clark, BLM More information about the Trainer Incentive Program: http://www.mustangheritagefoundation.org/tip.php More information about the Wild Horse and Burro Program in Oregon and Washington: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/burns/wildhorse/index.php
Просмотров: 1281 BLMOREGON
Meet Pete! Air Tanker Pilot
 
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From inside the cockpit, Captain Pete Nolan talks about how being an air tanker pilot is just like a firefighter at a fire station.
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Cockpit video: Retardant drop on Windy Ridge Fire, eastern Oregon
 
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Cockpit video: Retardant drop Aug. 12, 2015, on the Windy Ridge Fire to protect a structure in eastern Oregon. Video was used on NBC Nightly News Aug. 17, 2015: http://www.nbcnews.com/storyline/western-wildfires/resources-are-scarce-western-wildfires-rage-n411386 A popular Vine of the drop: https://vine.co/v/epAwOD2Xvl3 +radio playlist from the cockpit = Santana & Creedence Windy Ridge Fire now 16,000 acres in size – latest info: http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4497/ Loading a single-engine air tanker with wildfire retardant: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QmJH8p3vCPg&feature=youtu.be video: BLM Vale
Просмотров: 9344 BLMOREGON
Archaeology at Rimrock Draw Rockshelter
 
13:47
In the summer of 2016, the BLM Burns District continued its partnership with the University of Oregon Museum of Natural and Cultural History and the Oregon Archaeological Society and conducted archaeological excavations at the Rimrock Draw Rockshelter site in southeastern Oregon. The site, discovered in 2009 by BLM Archaeologist Scott Thomas, has hosted archaeology field schools since 2011. In 2015, it became internationally known after archaeologists found a small stone tool under a layer of volcanic ash from a volcanic eruption about 15,800 years ago. This tool suggests one of the oldest known human occupations in the western United States. The 2016 excavations encountered significant rock and boulder debris, resulting from at least two occasions of portions of the rock wall calving or breaking off – probably around 8,000 and 10,000 years ago. These rocks limited access to the ground beneath them, and many were removed only after drilling and splitting reduced them to removeable sizes. In coordination with the BLM’s Scott Thomas, Dr. Peter O’Grady with the University of Oregon Museum of Natural and Cultural History directed excavations for the fifth year in 2016, and Jordan Pratt, graduate student at Texas A&M University, served as the excavation’s site supervisor. Volunteers from the Oregon Archaeological Society (including Larry Wheatley, Al Newnam, Dave Root, and Michael Santino), and the University of Oregon (including Sammi Almatrood and Jennifer Finn), and archaeologists from the BLM (including Evan Wight) conducted the excavations. Artist-in-residence Nancy Pobanz also participated throughout the summer excavations.
Просмотров: 4882 BLMOREGON
2016 Wildland Fire Season in the Pacific Northwest
 
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The 2016 Pacific Northwest fire season came to a close with just under a half million acres burned in Oregon and Washington. The numbers were not staggering, like in 2015 when 1.8 million acres burned. 2016 was an average year in every aspect but one: Humans caused 83% of the fires this year in the Pacific Northwest, compared to 63% of the fires in 2015. While the region had 22,000 recorded lightning strikes this summer, only 522 fires were ignited by lightning. • Approximately 498,507 acres were affected by wildfire in the Northwest (NW): o 192,483 acres in Oregon and 306,865 acres in Washington. • There were a total of 2,541* reported fires in the NW Geographic Area: o 1,219 in Oregon (human-caused 942, lightning-caused 277) o 1,320 in Washington (human-caused 1,175, lightning-caused 145) • There were 68 fires meeting large fire** criteria: 30 in Oregon and 38 in Washington. • NW Incident Management Teams (Type 1 & Type 2) mobilized 17 times. • To date, a total of 22,197 lightning strikes have been recorded. The largest number of strikes occurring in one day was 2,257 (June 7). • In Oregon, the largest fire/complex is the Rail for a total of 41,706 acres. • The largest fire/complex in Washington is the Range 12 at 176,600 acres. • The estimated total firefighting cost to date exceeds $104,788,805; this includes $65,394,437*** in Oregon and $39,394,368*** in Washington. • During peak fire activity, over 4,200 firefighters and support personnel were actively working on NW fires. • In Oregon, fires affected 76,469 acres of Sage-Grouse habitat: o Very high priority habitat = 0 o High priority habitat = 19,957 acres o Moderate habitat = 56,511 acres While our season has come to a close here, the southeast United States is experiencing a difficult late fire season. This month the Pacific Northwest has sent about 800 people, including several contract crews and resources, to help contain the many ongoing fires that have burned 1.3 million acres so far this year in the southern region. Special thanks to video from David Corr showing Squad 21, out of the Fremont-Winema National Forest, working on the Bybee Creek Fire in Crater Lake National Park. *OR & WA individual counts may not equal NW total. NW dispatch offices report for small portions of neighboring states. **To be considered a “large fire”, a wildfire must be at least 100 acres in timber or 300 acres in grass or brush. ***not all costs have been reported
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Wild Rogue River Permit Guidelines
 
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All Wild Section Rogue River boaters are asked to review one of the 2015 Wild Rogue River Permit Guideline Videos before going on their Wild Section Rogue River float trip. This includes Commercial and Noncommercial boaters. These videos are also available for viewing at the Smullin Visitor Center, where boaters are required to check-in to pick-up their permit ahead of their trip. The Rogue River is located in southwestern Oregon and flows 215 miles from Crater Lake to the Pacific Ocean. The 84 mile, Congressionally designated "National Wild and Scenic" portion of the Rogue begins 7 miles west of Grants Pass and ends 11 miles east of Gold Beach. The Rogue was one of the original eight rivers included in the Wild and Scenic Rivers Act of 1968. The Rogue National Wild and Scenic River is surrounded by forested mountains and rugged boulder and rock-lined banks. Steelhead and salmon fishery, challenging whitewater, and extraordinary wildlife viewing opportunities have made the Rogue a national treasure. Black bear, river otter, black-tail deer, bald eagles, osprey, Chinook salmon, great blue heron, water ouzel, and Canada geese are common wildlife seen along the Rogue River. Popular activities include: whitewater rafting, fishing, jet boat tours, scenic driving, hiking, picnicking, and sunbathing. For more information on this one-of-a-kind river, head on over to: http://blm.gov/scmd
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Lamprey on the Sandy River
 
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True "bony" fishes belong to a modern class, called Osteichthyes. Lampreys are not true fishes, and they actually belong to an ancient class of vertebrates, called Agnatha. Although these primitive fish lived for millions of years, the only survivors found today are hagfishes and lampreys. Lampreys are lacking many of the features that true fishes have, such as bones, scales, and paired fins. Their skeleton is formed completely from cartilage, and their bodies are eel-like and slimy. Pacific lampreys can grow up to two feet in length. Adult lampreys spawn from late spring to late summer. They generally spawn in stream riffles, where they use their specialized mouths to dig a depression among the rocks that will be used as a nest. Females lay up to 200,000 eggs. The eggs hatch and become larva, called ammocetes. The larval stage is what zoologists find most intriguing because by studying this stage they are able to make important evolutionary links between the ancient invertebrates and modern vertebrates. Ammocetes are blind, and they spend most of the larval stage buried in the stream bottom with only their mouths exposed to protect themselves from predators. During this stage of their life they are filter-feeders, meaning they feed on microscopic organisms in the water. Ammocetes may take between five and seven years to finally metamorphose into adults. As adults, lampreys have a very unique lifestyle. Lampreys do not have jaws like our modern fishes. During metamorphosis their filter-feeding mouth is reformed into a circular mouth, called an oral disc. Their tongue is also unique, having small teeth on the surface. These mouthparts serve a very important purpose. Adult lampreys are parasites, meaning they attach themselves to another species (called the host) and take the nutrients they need from it. After metamorphosis adult lampreys migrate to the ocean and attach themselves to large fish using their mouths. The teeth on the specialized tongue are used to penetrate the host fish, which allows the lamprey to feed on the host's fluids. When the lamprey is no longer receiving enough fluids, it releases itself from the host and finds a new one. Most of the host fish survive, but some will die from loss of fluids and/or infection in the open wound. Salmon, a popular host fish, are commonly found with scars from lampreys. After one to two years in the sea, the adults will return to the stream where they were born to stream to spawn. This migration back to fresh water begins in fall, and it takes the lampreys up to five months to complete their journey. Species that are born in freshwatee, then migrate to the ocean as adults, and return to freshwater to spawn are called "anadramous." They will excavate their nests in stream riffles, lay eggs, and die shortly after. In 2007, BLM partner agencies like the U.S. Forest Service and the Freshwater Trust began fixing decades of human river manipulation, returning the ecosystem to its more natural state. This included removing two dams in the Sandy Basin, demolishing river berms and putting log jams at strategic points to increase water flow to vital side channels, where steelhead like to lay eggs. For several years now, Bruce Zoellick—fish biologist for the Bureau of Land Management—has been doing practically everything he could to restore habitat for the threatened steelhead. That even means snorkeling underwater to count juvenile fish. The results have been encouraging, to say the least. “I’m so excited about steelhead because it’s a great response — but it’s also my favorite fish,” said Zoellick after a river survey last month. Since 2012, Zoellick has been closely monitoring a particular 2-mile stretch of the Salmon River, a primary tributary for the Sandy, maneuvering all the side channels to count steelhead redds, or nests in the gravel where fish lay eggs. “We reconnected those side channels and got a really good response from the fish,” said Zoellick, who added that numbers for coho salmon and lamprey are also positive. To learn more about the BLM's fisheries program head on over to: http://www.blm.gov/or/programs/fisheries/index.php Footage shot on the Sandy River in spring 2016. Video: Bruce Zoellick Music: Ukelele Parade by Fernando Oyaguez Reyes
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Floating the Rogue River
 
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Guidelines to floating the Rogue! The Rogue River is located in southwestern Oregon and flows 215 miles from Crater Lake to the Pacific Ocean. The 84 mile, Congressionally designated "National Wild and Scenic" portion of the Rogue begins 7 miles west of Grants Pass and ends 11 miles east of Gold Beach. The Rogue was one of the original eight rivers included in the Wild and Scenic Rivers Act of 1968. The Rogue National Wild and Scenic River is surrounded by forested mountains and rugged boulder and rock-lined banks. Check out the Rogue River Float Guide (PDF) for more information on the Wild and Scenic Rogue River. Steelhead and salmon fishery, challenging whitewater, and extraordinary wildlife viewing opportunities have made the Rogue a national treasure. Black bear, river otter, black-tail deer, bald eagles, osprey, Chinook salmon, great blue heron, water ouzel, and Canada geese are common wildlife seen along the Rogue River. Popular activities include: whitewater rafting, fishing, jet boat tours, scenic driving, hiking, picnicking, and sunbathing. This video will help you get out on the Rogue for a truly unforgettable experience! Additional information is also available online at: http://www.blm.gov/or/resources/recreation/rogue/index.php
Просмотров: 6165 BLMOREGON
Oregon Wild Horse Adoption, January 2017
 
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https://www.blm.gov/adoptahorse/ Oregon's Wild Horse Corral Facility in Hines, Oregon, prepares all horses from the range for adoption. Before adopted horses and burros are shipped from the facility, they are given a final brand and health inspection by a veterinarian. The Oregon wild horses in this video are set to be available for adoption starting January 31 and ending on February 13. Applications are open January 30 through February 13: https://on.doi.gov/2katUkr More information about the BLM corral in Burns: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/burns/wildhorse/corral.php. If you are interested in adopting a wild horse or burro or taking a tour, please visit the corral facility, stop by the BLM office at 28910 Highway 20 West in Hines, or give us a call at (541) 573-4400.
Просмотров: 56895 BLMOREGON
In the Field: Law Enforcement Ranger
 
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Law Enforcement Ranger Moi Herrera inspects and cleans up more than 700 pounds of garbage found illegally dumped on BLM public land outside Vale, Oregon. Illegal dumping is a Class A misdemeanor in Oregon; punishable by a fine up to $6,250, imprisonment up to one year, or both. Video: Larry Moore, BLM
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In the Field: Natural Resource Specialist
 
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Todd Allai, Natural Resource Specialist for the Vale District BLM, talks about his work in monitoring the Willow Creek area in Southeastern Oregon. More info on the Vale district: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/vale/index.php Video by Larry Moore, BLM communications
Просмотров: 984 BLMOREGON
Salmon River Restoration -- Part II
 
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Fall Chinook and Coho are currently spawning! The rivers, streams, and lakes of Oregon and Washington are home to a diverse array of fish species and the BLM is committed to the restoration and protection of the aquatic habitat. Salmon and trout species found on BLM-managed lands include bull trout, westslope cutthroat trout, Yellowstone cutthroat trout, Lahontan cutthroat trout, redband trout, steelhead trout, and chinook and sockeye salmon. Five of these species (bull trout, Lahontan cutthroat trout, steelhead trout, chinook salmon, and sockeye salmon) are on the Endangered Species Act list in all or portions of their distribution. The BLM is actively working to address the management of fish and their habitat in District Resource Management Plans and through such initiatives as the Northwest Forest Plan, PACFISH and InFish. The BLM is also a member of the Federal Caucus, which is a group of nine federal agencies with management responsibilities for listed fish species. The Caucus works together to improve interagency coordination and management of all the factors that influence fish survival: habitat, hatcheries, harvest, and hydropower operations. Also, through active management, BLM strives to achieve resilient aquatic and riparian habitats, conserve listed species and their habitats, and maintain water quality and availability for its many beneficial uses. As part of its 2015 Strategic Plan, Oregon/Washington BLM has identified Priority Watersheds to focus on future restoration needs with the available workforce and budget. See exactly which watersheds that the BLM has focused our nation's resources at: http://www.blm.gov/or/programs/fisheries/files/healthy_lands_riparian.pdf • Fall chinook spawning occurs in the Rogue Valley from early October through early January. • Coho salmon spawning in Douglas County peaks in late November through early December. • Fall chinook spawning in coastal rivers occurs now through mid-December, peaking in mid-November. • Coho salmon spawning is mid-November to early February. Spawning peaks in December in the Coos system and late December to early January in the Coquille.
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How To Read A Map
 
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The BLM's mapping unit publishes maps, brochures, and graphic support for management plans, congressionally-designated wilderness proposals, public recreation sites, and other public land-related activities. The BLM does not offer these items for sale online. However, checks can be made payable to the Department of the Interior, Bureau of Land Management (DOI-BLM). We also accept MasterCard, Visa, Discover, and American Express at our offices. Call 503-808-6008 for prices and availability, or visit us at 1220 S.W. 3rd Avenue, Portland, Oregon. www.blm.gov/or/onlineservices/maps
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Oregon Wild Horse Adoption, July 2016
 
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Every year, Oregon's Wild Horse Corral Facility in Hines, Oregon, prepares horses from the range for adoption. Before adopted horses and burros are shipped away from the facility, they are given a final brand and health inspection by a veterinarian. The Oregon wild horses in this video are set to be available via the July Internet Adoption, starting July 19 and ending on August 2. Applications are open July 18 through August 1: https://www.blm.gov/adoptahorse/onlinegallery.php?horseCategory=641 More information about the BLM corral in Burns: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/burns/wildhorse/corral.php If you are interested in adopting a wild horse or burro or taking a tour, please visit the corral facility, stop by the BLM office at 28910 Highway 20 West in Hines, or give us a call at (541) 573-4400.
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Steens Mountain Diamond Craters
 
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Diamond Craters, an Outstanding Natural Area of 17,000 acres, has some of the most diverse basaltic volcanic features in the nation clustered within a small, accessible area. Located in the high desert country about 55 miles southeast of Burns, Oregon, Diamond Craters is really unlike any other place in North America. That's the opinion held by scores of scientists and educators who have visited and studied the area. It has the "best and most diverse basaltic volcanic features in the United States and all within a comparatively small and accessible area," one geologist summarized. There is only a 550 foot range from the lowest to highest point with elevations ranging from 4,150 to 4,700 feet above sea level. Named for Mace McCoy's diamond brand, Diamond Craters displays an entire range of eruptions possible in basaltic volcanism. This volcanic area was formed some time in the past 25,000 years, with some of the eruptions taking place as late as 1,000 years ago, and now resembles a thin, rocky pancake with a few bumps. Features identifiable at the Outstanding Natural Area include craters and vents, cinder cones, spatter cones, lava tubes, driblet spires, a graben, and water-filled maar. Find out more about this unique Oregon site at: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/burns/recreation/diamond_craters.php
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Geology of Table Rocks
 
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Approximately 48 to 35 million years ago, the Payne Cliffs Formation was being deposited by rivers in the area of the Table Rocks. The Payne Cliffs Formation is made up of river deposited sandstone and conglomerates. From 20 to 10 million years ago the uplift of the nearby Klamath Mountains and the formation of the Rogue Valley took place. About 7 million years ago, a shield volcano erupted a lava flow that was approximately forty-four miles long and spread out over the entire valley, from the Prospect area to Sams Valley. This mass of lava caused the valley floor to rise in elevation to the height of the top of Table Rocks. The 4,864-acre Table Rocks Management Area is cooperatively owned and administered by the Medford District Bureau of Land Management (2,105 acres) and The Nature Conservancy (2,759 acres). Memorandums of Understanding signed in 2011 and 2012 with the Confederated Tribes of the Grand Ronde and the Cow Creek Band of Umpqua Tribe of Indians allow for coordinating resources to protect the Table Rocks for present and future generations. A cooperative management plan for the area was completed in 2013. The Table Rocks trails are some of the most highly used trails in the Rogue Valley—almost 50,000 people hike the trails to the top each year. You could be one of hundreds of hikers enjoying the wildflowers and scenic vistas on a beautiful spring day, or you could be the lone hiker on a cold, foggy winter day. Some people like to linger and take their time getting to the top, watching for birds and identifying wildflowers on the way, while others run the trail and focus on getting a workout. During the spring months, BLM Rangers lead large school groups on guided hikes Tuesday through Fridays, stopping often along the trail. To encounter fewer people and school groups, consider hiking in the early morning or early afternoon on weekdays. To find out more about this stunning area head on over to: http://blm.gov/19ld
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Mustangs Return Home
 
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On July 8 and 9, the BLM returned 45 mustangs to the Jackies Butte Herd Management Area (HMA) in southeast Oregon. They were originally rescued in August 2012 when 95% of the HMA was burned by the Long Draw Fire. The range conditions have improved enough to let these wild horses return home.
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In the Field: Rangeland Management Specialist
 
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Bryce Jones talks about his work in managing Public Lands as a Rangeland Management Specialist for the Vale District BLM. This video was shot on April 10th, 2015, as Bryce went out to perform a count on Sage-grouse as they gathered for their annual breeding display.
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Owyhee River at Rome
 
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Floating along the Owyhee River in Oregon, you pass through astonishing high desert canyonlands with thousand foot rhyolite cliffs and sand castle rock formations. Visitors will marvel at the variety of birds and mammals, including river otters, bighorn sheep and golden eagles. The Owyhee River's fragile ecological balance requires the utmost respect from its visitors. The Owyhee River's floatable sections are very remote and contain numerous technical and challenging rapids. This river is not for the inexperienced floatboater! Once you enter these deeply carved canyons, you will be a long way from help. Emergency access is extremely difficult, and cell phone coverage is nonexistent within the confines of the canyon. You must be prepared to handle all problems and emergencies on your own. To properly prepare, floaters should contact the Vale BLM Office to obtain information well in advance of a planned float trip. A waterproof river guide that includes a river map identifying rapids may be purchased from the Vale BLM office (541-473-3144). Visit the Owyhee River Launch Site in Rome, OR today! http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/vale/recreation/owyhee.php
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Steens Mountain
 
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Welcome to the Steens Mountain Cooperative Management and Protection Area (CMPA) -- 428,156 acres of public land offering diverse scenic and recreational experiences. The CMPA encompasses an extraordinary landscape with deep glacier carved gorges, stunning scenery, wilderness, wild rivers, a rich diversity of plant and animal species, and a way of life for all who live there. The 52-mile Steens Mountain Backcountry Byway provides access to four campgrounds and the views from Kiger Gorge, East Rim, Big Indian Gorge, Wildhorse and Little Blitzen Gorge overlooks are not to be missed! Welcome to the CMPA and enjoy the many resources and activities awaiting you. For more info go to http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/burns/recreation/steens-mtn.php
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Cockpit video: Approaching eastern Oregon wildfires
 
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Cockpit video: Approaching Windy Ridge (right, 16,000 acres) & Cornet (left, 12,700 acres) fires in eastern Oregon for retardant drop Aug. 12, 2015. +radio playlist = Grand Funk Railroad Video was used on NBC Nightly News Aug. 17, 2015: http://www.nbcnews.com/storyline/west... A popular Vine of the drop: https://vine.co/v/epAwOD2Xvl3 Windy Ridge Fire latest info: http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4497/ Cornet Fire latest info: http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4478/ Loading a single-engine air tanker with wildfire retardant: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QmJH8p3vCPg&feature=youtu.be video: BLM Vale
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Crooked Wild and Scenic River!
 
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Designated as a wild and scenic river in 1988, the Crooked River is noted for its ruggedly beautiful scenery, outstanding whitewater boating and a renowned sport fishery for steelhead, brown trout and native rainbow trout. Located in central Oregon, it offers excellent hiking opportunities with spectacular geologic formations and waterfalls. A portion of the designated segment provides expert class 4 to 5 kayaking/rafting during spring runoff. Fifty million years of geologic history are dramatically displayed on the canyon walls of the Crooked Wild and Scenic River. Volcanic eruptions which occurred over thousands of years created a large basin dramatized by colorful layers of basalt, ash and sedimentary formations. The most significant contributor to the outstandingly remarkable geologic resources are the unique intra-canyon basalt formations created by recurring volcanic and hydrologic activities. Water from springs flow through the steep basalt canyon section of the Crooked Wild and Scenic River and has created a stream habitat that is extremely stable and diverse and unique in a dry semi-arid climate environment. The Crooked Wild and Scenic River offers a diversity of year-round recreation opportunities, such as fishing, hiking, backpacking, camping, wildlife and nature observation, whitewater boating, picnicking, swimming, hunting and photography. The Chimney Rock segment is popular for camping, fishing, hiking, bicycling and for viewing eagles, ospreys and other wildlife. The 2.6-mile (round trip) hike to Chimney Rock rewards visitors with expansive views of the Crooked River Canyon and Cascades. The lower section offers a semi-primitive experience due to its remoteness, and a portion of the river is noted for high quality class 4 to 5 whitewater paddling. The exceptionally scenic qualities along the Crooked River are due to the rugged natural character of the canyons, outstanding scenic vistas, limited visual intrusions and scenic diversity resulting from a variety of geologic formations, vegetation communities and dynamic river characteristics. State Scenic Highway 27, a designated National Back Country Byway, offers views of western juniper decorating the steep hillsides, spectacular geologic formations and eroded lava flows throughout the narrow, winding canyon corridor. The river supports critical mule deer winter range habitat and nesting/hunting habitat for bald eagles, golden eagles, ospreys and other raptors. Bald eagles are known to winter within the Crooked River segment and along the Deschutes River downriver from the Lower Bridge. For more information about this remote Oregon wonderland stop on by the BLM Office in Prineville, Oregon, or head on over to: www.blm.gov/visit Hope to see you out on the river making your splash!
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Woodrat Mountain
 
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Between the towns of Jacksonville and Ruch, west of Medford, this unique mountain top launching area offers a specially cleared and sloped launch point with a gradient that maximizes safe and effective take offs. The site frequently experiences moderate thermal uplifts which provide an opportunity for excellent gliding. The landing area is approximately one half mile from the launch area with an approximately 1000' vertical descent. Find out more at: http://www.blm.gov/or/resources/recreation/site_info.php?siteid=328
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National Environmental Policy Act
 
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Congress enacted NEPA in December, 1969, and President Nixon signed it into law on January 1, 1970. NEPA was the first major environmental law in the United States and is often called the "Magna Carta" of environmental laws. Importantly, NEPA established this country's national environmental policies. In NEPA, Congress recognized that the Federal Government's actions may cause significant environmental effects. The range of actions that cause significant environmental effects is broad and includes issuing regulations, providing permits for private actions, funding private actions, making federal land management decisions, constructing publicly-owned facilities, and many other types of actions. Agencies are required to determine if their proposed actions have significant environmental effects and to consider the environmental and related social and economic effects of their proposed actions. Often private individuals or companies will become involved in the NEPA process when they need a permit issued by a Federal agency. When a company applies for a permit (for example, for crossing federal lands) the agency that is being asked to issue the permit must evaluate the environmental effects of the permit decision under NEPA. The purpose of NEPA and the mission of the BLM are fully compatible. The BLM's mission is to sustain the health, diversity, and productivity of the public lands for the use and enjoyment of present and future generations. This closely mirrors BLM's multiple use and sustained yield mandates under the Federal Land Policy and Management Act. NEPA declares that the Federal government's continuing policy is to create and maintain conditions under which people and nature can exist in productive harmony and fulfill the social, economic, and other requirements of present and future generations of Americans. The BLM in Oregon and Washington has a NEPA document library that contains documents relevant to the BLM planning projects throughout Oregon and Washington. Documents can be searched by fiscal year, district, program area, and document type via the NEPA Document Search form. All of the BLM's planning documents can also be accessed by RRS feed: http://www.blm.gov/or/rss/nepa-or.xml For additional information about NEPA visit the BLM on the web at: http://www.blm.gov/or/plans/index.php
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Fish Snorkeling and the BLM
 
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How do you count fish in a river? If you're a fish biologist working for the Bureau of Land Management (BLM), you start by stuffing yourself into a dry suit and then traipsing through the forests and down to the river. With a snorkel and mask you plunge into the river and slither around in search of Coho, Chinook and Steelhead. These fish like to rest and stay cool in the recently built log jams. To track how many fish are in the Salmon River, fish biologist Bruce Zoellick and wildlife biologist Corbin Murphy stuff themselves into dry suits and strap on a snorkel to get up-close and personal with the fish. They count fish by species as they snorkel around the log jams and side channels. Habitat for Coho, Chinook, Steelhead, and a smattering of other fish that consider the “wild and scenic” river their home is getting a remodel. Through a cooperative effort, trees have been pulled up and hauled to the river where engineers have built log jams for fish and other aquatic species. The Salmon River Restoration Project is a cooperative effort with several partners including the BLM, Freshwater Trust, Nature Conservancy, Portland Water Bureau, and a host of others passionate about aquatic restoration. To learn more about the BLM’s fisheries program head on over to: www.blm.gov/or/programs/fisheries/index.php You also check out footage of the restoration project in action, here: www.youtube.com/watch?v=xd_NbCZBqjI
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Spring Basin Wilderness
 
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The Spring Basin Wilderness includes the colorful geologic features and rugged cliffs which give this are a unique beauty. Numerous vista points give visitors a sweeping view of the John Day river valley and solitude is provided by the remote canyons and vegetative diversity. These highly scenic settings set the stage for the outstanding opportunities for recreation activities such as photography, hiking, and nature study. This area provides for a unique combination of ecosystems, including: Palouse grassland province/wheatgrass, bluegrass, and sagebrush steppe. At present, there are no similar wilderness areas containing both of these ecosystems with this type of biological diversity. Colorful geologic features and rugged cliffs give this area a unique beauty and numerous vista points give the visitor a sweeping view of the John Day river valley. Solitude is provided by the remote canyons and vegetative diversity. Outstanding opportunities for solitude can be found in the numerous side canyons. Topographic and vegetative screening within the Spring Basin area enhances these solitude opportunities. Hay Bottom Canyon and Eagle Canyon offer some of the best solitude. There are also numerous other areas offering the visitor secluded spots. The predominant vegetation in the Spring Basin area is big sagebrush/bunchgrass and to a lesser extent, juniper/bunchgrass. There is a scattering of rabbitbrush and low sagebrush communications; associated grasses include bluebunch wheatgrass, needlegrass, Idaho fescue, Sandberg's bluegrass, sand dropseed, and cheatgrass. There are numerous other plants including several listed below under special features. Four plant species of special interest have been found within the area. Two species, Castilleja xanthotricha (yellow-hairy indian paint brush) and Astragalus diaphanus are Federal candidates for listing under the Endangered Species Act. The other two, Penstemon eriantherus var. argillosus (fuzzytongue penstemon) and Pediocactus simpsoni var. robustior (Hedgehog cactus) are of limited concern within Oregon, according to the Oregon Natural Heritage Data Base. Wildlife species occurring in the area include mule deer, chukar, golden eagles, prairie falcons, bobcats, California quail, meadowlarks, and mountain bluebirds. The northern bald eagle, listed as threatened in Oregon, is an occasional winter resident. Most portions of the Spring Basin area appear in a natural condition and are primarily affected by the forces of nature. http://www.blm.gov/or/resources/nlcs/index.php
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Fighting fire in a single-engine air tanker
 
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If you’ve ever wondered what it’s like to fight fire from the air – now you know! In early July 2015, a BLM SEAT, or single engine air tanker, responded to the Cottonwood fire in southeast Oregon. The fire was located just south of Juntura and Monument Peak in Oregon. This exciting footage is from the point of view a BLM single engine airtanker, or SEAT. The Bureau of Land Management Fire and Aviation program is a large and complex organization having primary responsibility for fire response and management on 253 million acres of public land. The protection and safety of firefighters and the public is the top priority, followed by working closely with other land and resource management disciplines to identify and achieve fire management goals and to benefit and sustain natural resources. To learn more about the BLM’s fire and aviation program head on over to: www.blm.gov/or/resources/fire/index
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The National Historic Oregon Trail Interpretive Center
 
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The National Historic Oregon Trail Interpretive Center offers living history demonstrations, interpretive programs, exhibits, multi-media presentations, special events, and more than four miles of interpretive trails. Open daily except Christmas Day, Thanksgiving, and New Year's Day* 9:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m., April - October 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m., November - March *severe weather or icy conditions may require temporary closure National Historic Oregon Trail Interpretive Center Baker City, Oregon Telephone: 541-523-1843 http://www.blm.gov/or/oregontrail
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Inside a Timber Harvester
 
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A demonstration last month at the Gordon Creek III timber sale provided an opportunity to step inside a tree harvester and experience what a modern Oregonian lumberjack sees during forest thinning. Gordon Creek III timber sale: *Salem District of BLM Oregon *453 total acres *contract expires Dec. 19, 2014 Cut-to-length harvester: *head grips and holds tree to be harvested *cuts tree at the base *pulls tree through knives to remove limbs *computer determines exact length to cut log *places logs in pile for transport Flickr photo set from timber demo: https://www.flickr.com/photos/blmoregon/sets/72157645295556780/ Thanks to Wayne Stone Logging of Sandy, Oregon, and harvester Ben Reed. Video by Toshio Suzuki
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Grande Ronde Wild and Scenic River!
 
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Welcome to the Grand Ronde wild and scenic river! The Grande Ronde River is located in northeast Oregon and flows through a mix of privately owned lands and those administered by the Bureau of Land Management and Forest Service. At 43.8 miles (70.5 km) in length, the federally protected section begins at the confluence with the Minam River near Rondowa and ends near the Oregon-Washington border. The entire river corridor is a complex ecosystem rich in unique natural features, history, spectacular scenery and a variety of plant and animal life. The "upper river," from Minam to Troy, consists of steep basalt canyons and ascending ridges within a dense evergreen forest, portions of which are only accessible by boat. The meandering curves of the "middle river" parallel a seldom-traveled county road, as the canyon begins to widen and forests yield to open ridges and steep range lands. The "lower river" section in Washington is characterized by sparsely vegetated, rugged terrain and contains the history of ancient peoples and pioneer homesteads amongst a few active ranches. Designated Reach: October 28, 1988. From its confluence with the Wallowa River to the Oregon-Washington border. Classification/Mileage: Wild — 26.4 miles; Recreational — 17.4 miles; Total — 43.8 miles. Scenery The Grande Ronde River corridor contains a diversity of landforms and vegetation that progress from largely forested vistas to forested stringers—patches of residual pre-fire forest, separated by native bunchgrass slopes. River users see a largely untouched viewshed in the upper river reach, while the lower portion flows through open, grass covered hills with forested pockets and tributary canyons. Recreation There are many recreational opportunities on the Grande Ronde. Those judged to be exceptional in quality include anadromous and resident fishing; floating (rafting, canoeing and kayaking for overnight use); and big game viewing and hunting. Visitors are able to enjoy an unusually long float season for a free-flowing river, from ice breakup in the spring to freeze up in the fall. Trips offer a rare multiple-day float for those with beginner and intermediate skills. The primary launch site for the Wallowa and Grande Ronde corridors, as well as the location of Bureau of Land Management's river station, are located on state lands at Minam on the Wallowa River. Additional access points include Mud Creek, Troy and Boggan's Oasis. Primitive campsites along the river are on a first-come, first-served basis. Many portions of the river are roadless and primitive with limited access by vehicles. Fisheries The Grande Ronde River is a nationally renowned sport fishery, one of the top three in the region. The mainstem and its major tributaries provide spawning and rearing habitat for wild and hatchery stock of spring and fall chinook, summer steelhead and rainbow trout. Fishing is excellent, even late in the season after the water levels have receded. Wildlife The area hosts an exceptional diversity of species, in part because the river corridor provides critical wintering habitat for bighorn sheep, elk, mule deer and whitetail deer. Other species contributing to the impressive viewing opportunities include black bear, cougar and mountain goats. The river corridor also serves as a sensitive wintering area for bald eagles. For more information contact: Vale District Office 100 Oregon Street Vale, OR 97918 Phone: 541-473-3144 Fax: 541-473-6213 E-mail: BLM_OR_VL_Mail@blm.gov www.blm.gov/visit Video: Michael Campbell, Dave Johnson, Kathy Stangl, and Aaron Haselby, BLM Narration: Greg Shine, BLM
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360° rafting along the Yakima River Canyon
 
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For our latest 360-degree experience (aka, virtual reality), we take you down one of central Washington's most beautiful river canyons. The Yakima River Canyon is quickly becoming a recreation destination for families and friends seeking an easy floating trip in a beautiful environment. On this virtual trip you can look down into the raft, check out the canyons to the left and right, or look up to see the cliff swallows flying overhead! The 360-degree videos work best on enabled web browsers with fast internet connections and smartphones with the YouTube app. The BLM has several campgrounds along the Yakima River Canyon – to find out more about day use and camping fees: http://www.blm.gov/or/resources/recreation/site_info.php?siteid=251
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