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Videos uploaded by user “Newsy Science” for the 2016
A Brain Parasite Might Be Making Us Angrier - Newsy
 
02:07
Transcript: More and more studies are hinting that our brains might not be completely our own. The parasite Toxoplasma gondii, Toxo for short, may be changing human behavior — perhaps even making us angrier and more aggressive. Toxo is one of those frightening parasites capable of controlling its hosts. It reproduces in the stomachs of cats, and it's always trying to get back inside one. So when an animal, usually a mouse or rat, becomes infected through contact with cat poop, the parasite gets into the rodent's brain and literally rewires it. Basically, it makes its host fall in love with cats so it'll go find one and get eaten. Humans can contract the parasite, too, through eating unwashed vegetables or undercooked meat. And, obviously, through cat poop. But while it can pose problems for pregnant women or people with weakened immune systems, it's generally not considered a threat to human health. That's lucky because Toxo is incredibly common. Around a third of people in the world and more than 1 in 5 in the U.S. are infected, and the vast majority never suffer any ill effects. At least, that's what we thought. Over the past decade, studies have linked Toxo to higher rates of schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, depression, suicide attempts, risk taking, impulsiveness and now, aggression. A recent study found people with the parasite score higher on anger and aggression tests, and people with anger disorders are twice as likely to have the parasite than you'd expect from chance alone. What does all of this mean? Well, it's too early to say. None of the studies so far are considered proof that Toxo is driving changes in human behavior. Its effects might be overhyped due to its creepiness. But because it's so common, if infection really does raise the risk of mental illness even slightly, that could translate to tens of millions of cases. Sources: Videoblocks https://www.videoblocks.com/video/radiologist-watching-monitors-of-brain-scan-med_hospital_radiologist_002/ EurekAlert! http://www.eurekalert.org/multimedia/pub/111460.php Videoblocks https://www.videoblocks.com/video/large-crowd-at-grand-central-station-4/ Wikimedia Commons https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Toxoplasma_gondii.jpg Videoblocks https://www.videoblocks.com/video/germany-cat-sitting-in-grass/ Wikimedia Commons https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Toxoplasma_gondii_tissue_cyst_in_mouse_brain.jpg EurekAlert! http://www.eurekalert.org/multimedia/pub/61855.php?from=249032 Videoblocks https://www.videoblocks.com/video/fruits-and-vegetables-at-street-market-in-romania/ Videoblocks https://www.videoblocks.com/video/cat-eating-a-mouse-in-the-grass/ Videoblocks https://www.videoblocks.com/video/moving-crowd-silhouettes/ CBS http://www.cbsnews.com/news/vancouver-embarrassed-over-post-game-rioting/ The Journal of Clinical Psychiatry http://dx.doi.org/10.4088/JCP.14m09621 Wikimedia Commons https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Toxoplasmosis_-_cropped_-_very_high_mag.jpg Wikimedia Commons https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:U_fibres_big.JPG ------------------------------------- Newsy is your source for concise, unbiased video news and analysis covering the top stories from around the world. With persistent curiosity and no agenda, we strive to fuel meaningful conversations by highlighting multiple sides of every story. Newsy delivers the news and perspective you need without the hype and bias common to many news sources. See more at http://www.newsy.com/ Like Newsy on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/newsyvideos/
Views: 9425 Newsy Science
Scented Candles Might Create Harmful Formaldehyde In Your Home - Newsy
 
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A recent study suggests the chemical emitted from citrus-scented candles might combine with ozone to create formaldehyde, which can cause cancer. See more at http://www.newsy.com/ Follow Jay Strubberg: http://www.twitter.com/JayStrubberg Sources: Getty Images http://www.gettyimages.com/license/52464695 BBC http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/articles/58KFJzpJb2kyLtDPhhHqnbQ/are-perfumed-products-bad-for-me Videoblocks https://www.videoblocks.com/video/close-up-of-janitor-squeezing-out-rag/ National Cancer Institute http://www.cancer.gov/about-cancer/causes-prevention/risk/substances/formaldehyde/formaldehyde-fact-sheet#q4 Image via: Getty Images / Scott Olson http://www.gettyimages.com/license/52464695
Views: 39899 Newsy Science
Prime Numbers May Not Be As Random As We Thought, And Why It Matters - Newsy
 
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Two Stanford University mathematicians found that the ending digits of prime numbers are actually less likely to repeat in the next prime number. Transcript: Prime numbers may not be as random as mathematicians previously thought –– a discovery that could eventually have real effects in fields like cryptography or cybersecurity. A quick math refresher: Prime numbers can only be divided by one and themselves. Two and five are examples. Start listing primes, though, and once you get past two and five, you'll see that if a number is prime, it will end in the digits 1, 3, 7 or 9. Scientists thought those four ending digits were random and had an equal chance of being the last digit of a prime number. But two Stanford mathematicians found it's not so random after all. For some reason, when analyzing the first billion prime numbers, the ending digits didn't have an equal chance of repeating themselves in the next prime number as the other three digits, making one digit easier to predict than the others. So for example, a prime number ending in 1 is less likely to be followed by another prime number ending in 1. Their work still needs to be peer-reviewed, but one of the researchers told Nature, "Every single person we've told this ends up writing their own computer program to check it for themselves." Now back to cryptography. When you purchase something online, prime numbers keep your card number safe. They've been used because their seemingly random nature made them hard to decode. Quartz reports, for now, the Stanford mathematicians' discovery doesn't change or endanger our financial security. But the researchers admit there's a lot they still don't know about their new phenomenon, and as they learn more, cryptography rules might be forced to change. This video includes images from Getty Images. Sources: Videoblocks https://www.videoblocks.com/video/computer-circuits/ arXiv http://arxiv.org/abs/1603.03720 Getty Images http://www.gettyimages.com/license/453488510 Getty Images http://www.gettyimages.com/license/136135707 Quartz http://qz.com/639452/mathematicians-are-geeking-out-about-a-bizarre-discovery-in-prime-numbers/ Videoblocks https://www.videoblocks.com/video/digital-green-numbers/ Getty Images http://www.gettyimages.com/license/79989027 ------------------------------------- Newsy is your source for concise, unbiased video news and analysis covering the top stories from around the world. With persistent curiosity and no agenda, we strive to fuel meaningful conversations by highlighting multiple sides of every story. Newsy delivers the news and perspective you need without the hype and bias common to many news sources. See more at http://www.newsy.com/ Like Newsy on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/newsyvideos/
Views: 4013 Newsy Science
Synthetic Life Has Been Streamlined And Is Ready To Be Put To Work - Newsy
 
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Transcript: In 2010, researchers at the J. Craig Venter Institute announced they'd created a bacteria that runs entirely on lab-made DNA — the world's first synthetic life-form. More than five years later later, they've streamlined, stripped down and organized that life-form, and are ready to turn it into a tiny factory. The team's 2010 announcement made headlines around the world. "This is the first self-replicating species that we've had on the planet whose parent is a computer," Venter said. But creating a life-form entirely programmed by humans was also seen as kind of scary. "This has enormous promise and enormous peril," said Paul Wolpe of the Emory Center for Ethics. "This story reminds me of 'Jurassic Park,' when all the dinosaurs got out and ran amok," Fox News's Jenna Lee said. But the process of making DNA in a lab has only gotten easier since then. Some of those same researchers now sell DNA-printing machines. The plan, though, has always been to strip down a genome to its bare essentials, cutting out every piece of unnecessary DNA. That would serve two goals: helping scientists learn more about how life works and taking the first steps to build custom bacteria. On the first point, it turns out we don't know life nearly as well as we thought. A viable life-form needs at least 473 genes. That's way higher than scientists predicted, and they still aren't sure what a third of those genes do. The team says even if this research only shows us how little we know, it would still be worth it. But they don't intend to stop there. They want to put this streamlined life-form to work. Bacteria are great at taking one compound and turning it into another. They're little chemistry labs, and many scientists believe using carefully built bacteria can solve a lot of the world's problems. Bacteria can turn switch grass into biofuel as easily as brewing beer. They create all kinds of medicines and can even generate electricity. But a stripped-down life-form can do all of that with a lot of advantages: You can make sure none of your ingredients go to waste, control mutations and, most importantly, design the genome from scratch to do exactly what you want. The researchers also said their stripped-down bacteria can give scientists clues to the origins of life. It apparently behaves how scientists think some of the world's first life-forms did. Sources: J. Craig Venter Institute http://www.jcvi.org/cms/research/projects/minimal-cell/overview/ Science http://science.sciencemag.org/content/351/6280/aad6253 TED Conferences https://www.ted.com/talks/craig_venter_unveils_synthetic_life?language=en#t-42041 ABC https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aRzrYNVXF28 Fox News http://www.foxnews.com/tech/2010/05/20/scientists-announce-produce-living-cell-using-manmade-dna.html Synthetic Genomics, Inc. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GmU8-9KfJU4 Getty Images http://www.gettyimages.com/license/474029550 U.S. Department of Energy https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8aGqwRhdZ14 National Science Foundation https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TBmyG7XDl8w Getty Images http://www.gettyimages.com/license/1609411 Getty Images http://www.gettyimages.com/license/905453 ------------------------------------- Newsy is your source for concise, unbiased video news and analysis covering the top stories from around the world. With persistent curiosity and no agenda, we strive to fuel meaningful conversations by highlighting multiple sides of every story. Newsy delivers the news and perspective you need without the hype and bias common to many news sources. See more at http://www.newsy.com/ Like Newsy on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/newsyvideos/
Views: 24952 Newsy Science
Scientists Help A Paralyzed Man Play 'Guitar Hero' - Newsy
 
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Transcript: A man with quadriplegia — paralysis of the arms and legs — has been able to regain movement in his fingers, hands and wrists thanks to a first-of-its-kind medical breakthrough. Ian Burkhart suffered a spinal cord injury in a diving accident in 2010, paralyzing him from the shoulders down. Researchers have been working with him for a few years now. Doctors implanted an electrical device into Burkhart's motor cortex — the part of the brain responsible for voluntary movement — and connected it to muscle stimulators around his arms. "Without the use of the system and the technology, Ian is not able to grasp objects. But once we connect the system and turn it on, Ian is actually able to open and close his hand. He is also able to pick up objects such as a bottle," said Chad Bouton, VP of Advanced Engineering and Technology at The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research. Signals from Burkhart's brain aren't able to reach his muscles on their own, but this procedure effectively bypasses the spinal cord injury to help those signals get through. Past medical advances helped humans control robotic limbs by imagining their movement, but it hasn't been possible for humans to use imagined movement to control their own anatomical limbs. Burkhart said in 2014: "Picking up a cup of water and drinking it, or brushing your teeth or feeding yourself — you know, those things. If you can do those on your own, it makes a big difference in your life." The implant and bypass have worked well enough that Burkhart is now able to play what looks like "Guitar Hero." But researchers say they have further improvements in mind. "Maybe in a few years from now, we can have a wireless system that allows patients like Ian to be able to move his hand, and his arms and his functions — his arm, and legs and overall functions — much better without having cables to connect," said Ohio State University neurological surgeon Dr. Ali Rezai. Sources: Nature http://nature.com/articles/doi:10.1038/nature17435 Johns Hopkins University https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9NOncx2jU0Q ------------------------------------- Newsy is your source for concise, unbiased video news and analysis covering the top stories from around the world. With persistent curiosity and no agenda, we strive to fuel meaningful conversations by highlighting multiple sides of every story. Newsy delivers the news and perspective you need without the hype and bias common to many news sources. See more at http://www.newsy.com/ Like Newsy on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/newsyvideos/
Views: 7081 Newsy Science
Dog Brought In To Be Surrogate Parent To 5 Cheetah Cubs - Newsy
 
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The cheetah cubs lost their mother shortly after they were born at the Cincinnati Zoo. The Australian shepherd will help the cubs learn to socialize. Transcript: An Australian shepherd has become an unexpected surrogate parent to five cheetah cubs who lost their mother. Staff at the Cincinnati Zoo performed a cesarean section on the 5-year-old cheetah mother, Willow, earlier this month after she developed complications. A team of veterinarians successfully delivered three males and two females, but the cubs require round-the-clock care due to weak immune systems. But Willow never made a full recovery after the surgery, and she passed away. That's when the zoo staff called in a dog named Blakely. He's a nursery companion who is brought in to help baby animals learn to socialize by snuggling and playing with them. Blakely also teaches his charges certain behaviors as they get older. For instance, he taught this baby takin named Dale how to jump around. TODAY reports Blakely has been brought in to help a variety of animals including wallabies, warthogs, aardvarks and even an ocelot. It's especially important that Blakely was brought in to help care for these five cheetah cubs because the species is endangered. At the most, only an estimated 12,000 cheetahs remain in existence today. Blakely will care for the five cubs throughout the eight to 12 weeks they spend in the zoo's nursery. This video includes clips from The Cincinnati Zoo & Botanical Garden and an image from _paVan_ / CC BY 2.0. Sources: The Cincinnati Zoo & Botanical Garden http://cincinnatizoo.org/blog/2016/03/22/nursery-dog-steps-in-as-surrogate-parent-to-cheetah-cubs-at-the-cincinnati-zoo/ The Cincinnati Zoo & Botanical Garden http://cincinnatizoo.org/blog/2016/03/18/cheetah-cubs-receiving-critical-care-at-cincinnati-zoo/ The Cincinnati Zoo & Botanical Garden http://cincinnatizoo.org/blog/2015/07/16/nursery-dog-makes-room-for-new-baby-takin-at-the-cincinnati-zoo/ Today http://www.today.com/pets/watch-out-mary-poppins-dog-may-be-best-nanny-ever-2D11980398 The Cincinnati Zoo & Botanical Garden https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LwO_H8sJVw4 Flickr https://www.flickr.com/photos/_pavan_/15599553676/in/photolist-pLtMQ1-8UPpDg-dbm3er-cAJxGJ-8opQTd-7GmS1P-eeUqGS-5a95v6-8omCzP-iQAzLa-7HKqPZ-e9qFMT-cEXSd1-2HJp5X-8GgYxp-8Gh12i-eeTgF5-9Hn5NM-8iq3EY-8opLPC-7dmqRY-9GCAYw-8opMnS-aUQQC-7dhS7g-8Dp8GM-7TgvE3-8omykT-CsHzj-2j3oFz-bwE24M-5adBgy-5adgCS-728YEw-bwE1ec-8XP1M7-gYfMbv-8UtYPh-cyVXS5-bwE2ND-fN6RFT-8LLr18-8XKYgx-qkpzQT-qZcZLm-cEXTHU-bDXzv8-7VSiw7-5a94it-phrAtt ------------------------------------- Newsy is your source for concise, unbiased video news and analysis covering the top stories from around the world. With persistent curiosity and no agenda, we strive to fuel meaningful conversations by highlighting multiple sides of every story. Newsy delivers the news and perspective you need without the hype and bias common to many news sources. See more at http://www.newsy.com/ Like Newsy on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/newsyvideos/
Views: 7613 Newsy Science
Virgin Galactic Unveils Its First Spacecraft Since Deadly 2014 Crash - Newsy
 
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Virgin Galactic revealed its new Unity spaceship on Friday, which it hopes will be the first vehicle to take tourists to space. See more at http://www.newsy.com/ Follow Melissa Prax: http://www.twitter.com/melprax Sources: Virgin Galactic https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Eahj_H5gVw CNN https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ARWWMiknT48 Virgin Galactic https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I87wIVudw9k KABC http://abc7.com/news/video-crash-site-of-virgin-galactics-spaceshiptwo/375178/ The National Traffic Safety Administration http://www.ntsb.gov/news/press-releases/Pages/PR20150728.aspx Getty Images http://www.gettyimages.com/license/458290688 Virgin Galactic http://image.net/previewAsset/364233087/false/virgingalactic/281456791 Virgin Galactic http://image.net/previewAsset/364233063/false/virgingalactic/281456791 CBS http://www.cbsnews.com/news/virgin-galactic-spaceship-has-in-flight-problem/ Virgin Galactic http://image.net/previewAsset/364232950/false/virgingalactic/281456791 Virgin Galactic https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I87wIVudw9k Image via: Virgin Galactic http://image.net/virgingalactic
Views: 3063 Newsy Science
Meet The Tiny, Immortal Hydra, Which Rips Itself Open To Eat - Newsy
 
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Hydras, tiny freshwater organisms known for their ability to seemingly live forever, tear a hole in their bodies to feed. Transcript: Hydras are tough little monsters, and I'm not talking about the serpent that's always fighting naked Greek heroes. Real hydras are less than half an inch long, appear to be able to live forever and have to rip open their bodies every time they want to eat something. Researchers at the University of California, San Diego, have recorded the first-ever up close videos of a hydra basically tearing itself a new one, illustrating in gross detail just how the process works. The typical hydra hangs out in fresh water and waits for small animals to brush against its tentacles, at which point the hydra poisons its prey and drags it into its mouth to be digested. The new videos show how the cells contract in a ring to turn a solid skin into a mouth opening, which can be wide enough to swallow prey larger than the hydra itself. It's just one more feature that seems to be unique to hydras. There's also the fact that the tiny killers seem not to age, which has led to new research on how we might someday be able to extend our own lifespans. But let's not copy the mouth thing. This video includes clips from Jon Houseman / CC BY SA 4.0 and Carter and Hyland et al. / Biophysical Journal 2016 and images from Luis García / CC BY SA 2.0, Frank Fox / CC BY SA 3.0 DE, Callen Hyland, Friederike Anton-Erxleben / CC BY 2.5 and Stephen Friedt / CC BY SA 3.0. Sources: Wikimedia Commons https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Hydr1001.webm Flickr https://www.flickr.com/photos/zaqarbal/1235260142/ Wikimedia Commons https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Mikrofoto.de-Hydra_15.jpg EurekAlert! http://www.eurekalert.org/multimedia/emb/110296.php?from=320887 EurekAlert! http://www.eurekalert.org/multimedia/emb/110297.php?from=320887 Biophysical Journal http://www.cell.com/biophysj/fulltext/S0006-3495(16)00052-7 Wikimedia Commons https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Hydr1003.webm Wikimedia Commons https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Hydra_magnipapillata.jpg EurekAlert! http://www.eurekalert.org/multimedia/emb/110298.php?from=320887 Wikimedia Commons https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Hydr1005.webm Wikimedia Commons https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Hydras_(8).JPG ------------------------------------- Newsy is your source for concise, unbiased video news and analysis covering the top stories from around the world. With persistent curiosity and no agenda, we strive to fuel meaningful conversations by highlighting multiple sides of every story. Newsy delivers the news and perspective you need without the hype and bias common to many news sources. See more at http://www.newsy.com/ Like Newsy on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/newsyvideos/
Views: 13959 Newsy Science
Gene Editing Tool CRISPR Is Making Scientists Face The Hard Questions - Newsy
 
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The CRISPR-Cas9 tool makes genetic engineering cheap and easy, making it a powerful tool that has the potential to be abused. See more at http://www.newsy.com/ Follow Katherine Biek: http://www.twitter.com/katherinebiek Sources: University of California, Berkeley https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=avM1Yg5oEu0 Massachusetts Institute of Technology https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2pp17E4E-O8 MIT Technology Review http://www.technologyreview.com/emtech/14/video/watch/feng-zhang-genome-editing/ U.S. Department of Energy https://www.flickr.com/photos/departmentofenergy/11966778293/ U.S. Department of Energy https://www.flickr.com/photos/departmentofenergy/9566254742/ U.S. Department of Energy https://www.flickr.com/photos/departmentofenergy/15656596611/ U.S. Department of Energy https://www.flickr.com/photos/departmentofenergy/15659303815/ CBC https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=krxQWQ-b7WY University of California, Berkeley https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8Ijr1ccYPtI Sun Yat-sen University https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_3nkgMkiqP0 Protein & Cell http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs13238-015-0153-5 House Committee on Science, Space and Technology https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7kU5EiT-0nY TED Conferences https://www.ted.com/talks/jennifer_doudna_we_can_now_edit_our_dna_but_let_s_do_it_wisely?language=en National Institutes of Health http://www.nih.gov/about-nih/who-we-are/nih-director/statements/statement-nih-funding-research-using-gene-editing-technologies-human-embryos National Institutes of Health https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7ITN0rfE5Yk The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine http://nationalacademies.org/gene-editing/Gene-Edit-Summit/ Image via: L. Solomon and F. Zhang http://www.eurekalert.org/multimedia/pub/51425.php
Views: 4156 Newsy Science
We're Getting Better And Better At Controlling Stuff With Our Minds - Newsy
 
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Scientists have figured out how to use our brainwaves for everything from racing drones to restoring the function of paralyzed limbs. Transcript: Researchers are getting better at harnessing brain signals. These days, you can strap on a headset and control a drone with nothing but your thoughts. "We have a computer program that you look at. We tell you, 'Think forward. Think about pushing a chair forward.' So we learn to navigate the drone based on your brain patterns for specific things you're thinking about," said University of Florida's Juan Gilbert. And as mind-reading gets easier, there are more and more things that can be mind-controlled. Hooking into the brain can restore old motor function. Doctors bypassed Ian Burkhart's damaged spinal cord and gave him control over his arm again. DARPA knows how to access the nervous system and restore a sense of touch to people with prosthetic limbs. People can even control other people. Researchers at the University of Washington wired up two participants so one person could move another's arm just by thinking. The scientists say that last one might eventually lead to transferring knowledge from brain to brain, "Matrix"-style. This video includes clips from Coöperatie SURF / CC BY 3.0, University of Florida, PBS, The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, DARPA, University of Washington and Warner Bros. Sources: Researchers are getting better at harnessing brain signals. These days, you can strap on a headset and control a drone with nothing but your thoughts. "We have a computer program that you look at. We tell you, 'Think forward. Think about pushing a chair forward.' So we learn to navigate the drone based on your brain patterns for specific things you're thinking about," said University of Florida's Juan Gilbert. And as mind-reading gets easier, there are more and more things that can be mind-controlled. Hooking into the brain can restore old motor function. Doctors bypassed Ian Burkhart's damaged spinal cord and gave him control over his arm again. DARPA knows how to access the nervous system and restore a sense of touch to people with prosthetic limbs. People can even control other people. Researchers at the University of Washington wired up two participants so one person could move another's arm just by thinking. The scientists say that last one might eventually lead to transferring knowledge from brain to brain, "Matrix"-style. This video includes clips from Coöperatie SURF / CC BY 3.0, University of Florida, PBS, The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, DARPA, University of Washington and Warner Bros. ------------------------------------- Newsy is your source for concise, unbiased video news and analysis covering the top stories from around the world. With persistent curiosity and no agenda, we strive to fuel meaningful conversations by highlighting multiple sides of every story. Newsy delivers the news and perspective you need without the hype and bias common to many news sources. See more at http://www.newsy.com/ Like Newsy on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/newsyvideos/
Views: 3281 Newsy Science
Want To Visit A Distant Star? Hitch A Ride On A Space Laser - Newsy
 
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Transcript: What do you get when you cross lasers, tiny space probes and billions of dollars? Hopefully a ton of information about Alpha Centauri, the closest star system to our own. Yuri Milner and Stephen Hawking have announced a new project called Breakthrough Starshot. They want to send light-propelled spacecraft flying through space at 100 million miles per hour, reaching Alpha Centauri in around 20 years. Astrophysicist Jonathan McDowell says it'd take a whole lot longer with current technology: "The Voyagers that are heading out toward the stars — they're going to take 20,000 years to get there. That's not acceptable. ... We're talking about putting something 1,000 times faster than any human artifact has ever gone." The so-called nanocraft will make their way to space in a rocket. Once there, they'll unfurl their lightsails and rely on high-power lasers on Earth to begin to push them toward Alpha Centauri. Before Milner and Hawking can make this happen, they've got to test it — that's what Breakthrough Startshot's for. It's meant to prove the plan could really work so other organizations will take the next step. If it's proven to work, scientists could eventually send thousands of data-gathering probes, called StarChips, to collect loads of information — including photos — from our neighboring star. Sources: The New York Times http://www.nytimes.com/2016/04/13/science/alpha-centauri-breakthrough-starshot-yuri-milner-stephen-hawking.html?_r=0 WBUR http://hereandnow.wbur.org/2016/04/12/starshot-alpha-centauri NASA https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L4hf8HyP0LI ------------------------------------- Newsy is your source for concise, unbiased video news and analysis covering the top stories from around the world. With persistent curiosity and no agenda, we strive to fuel meaningful conversations by highlighting multiple sides of every story. Newsy delivers the news and perspective you need without the hype and bias common to many news sources. See more at http://www.newsy.com/ Like Newsy on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/newsyvideos/
Views: 4755 Newsy Science
NASA's Racing Against Time To Fix $600 Million Spacecraft
 
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NASA is scrambling to save a $600 million spacecraft that's gone into "emergency mode."  Experiencing what one researcher called a "spacecraft emergency," the Kepler space telescope is now rapidly burning through fuel, and NASA is running out of time to save it. Engineers first discovered the telescope was in emergency mode Thursday and believe it actually entered that stage at least a day before.  One of the biggest obstacles engineers now face is Kepler is 75 million miles from Earth. Even at the speed of light, signals take 13 minutes to go between Kepler and NASA's home base. It's unclear what's exactly wrong with the spacecraft, but it might not be an easy fix. NASA scientists will have to find a way to repair Kepler with whatever the spacecraft already has on it. Engineers fixed a different major problem in 2013 by using pressure from sunlight to keep Kepler steady.  NASA's poured a huge amount of money into the Kepler project. The spacecraft launched in 2009 and was only supposed to take four years. But severe breakdowns and hard-to-read data have plagued the mission. The space telescope's mission is to search for planets that could potentially hold life. By the beginning of 2016, Kepler had found 1,000 of those planets.  This video includes clips and images from NASA and images from NASA Ames/JPL-Caltech/T Pyle. Newsy is your source for concise, unbiased video news and analysis covering the top stories from around the world. With persistent curiosity and no agenda, we strive to fuel meaningful conversations by highlighting multiple sides of every story. Newsy delivers the news and perspective you need without the hype and bias common to many news sources. See more at http://www.newsy.com/ Like Newsy on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/newsyvideos/
Views: 9657 Newsy Science
How To Get Better At Quantum Computing: Make A Game Of It - Newsy
 
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Transcript: Quantum physics is hard. Building a quantum computer — the long-sought next step in computing that uses handfuls of atoms — is its own special brand of hard. Scientists are experimenting with putting single atoms into a tiny lattice, but it requires a laser-precise touch and a quick hand. Shuffle the atoms too quickly or too slowly and it won't work, and the mathematical models scientists use aren't great at solving the problem. So physics researchers in Denmark made a game out of it. In "Bring Home Water," players have to strike the fast/slow balance themselves. A researcher said: "The faster the atom is moved, the easier it is to spill the water. The players thus have to find the fastest way to 'bring home' the atom without losing it." The researchers found players come up with faster, easier ways to complete the experiments than the mathematical models scientists start with. Turning to the crowd can give scientists an extra resource beyond raw computer processing power: human intuition. This is the first time scientists have gamified quantum physics, but other researchers have used human judgment to solve complex protein-folding problems. Even players in the sci-fi game universe of "EVE Online" have chipped in. They classify images of human cells, contribute to the Human Protein Atlas and get in-game rewards for their work. As the quantum computer researchers write, "When we understand deeper how humans turn a hugely complicated problem into something manageable — and then solve it — we can build smarter algorithms to solve these problems." Sources: Nature http://press.nature.com/wp-content/uploads/files/2016/04/Maniscalco-NV-Sherson.pdf ScienceAtHome https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3U-hzGgUsHY Nature https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=axN0xdhznhY Nature http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v466/n7307/full/nature09304.html CCP Games http://www.eveonline.com/discovery/ ScienceAtHome https://www.scienceathome.org/citizen-science/about ScienceAtHome https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YmeT9njp86Y&index=5&list=PL5etAcp2_G2L3DGvXhopNQ_cnHHa7XTqK ------------------------------------- Newsy is your source for concise, unbiased video news and analysis covering the top stories from around the world. With persistent curiosity and no agenda, we strive to fuel meaningful conversations by highlighting multiple sides of every story. Newsy delivers the news and perspective you need without the hype and bias common to many news sources. See more at http://www.newsy.com/ Like Newsy on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/newsyvideos/
Views: 1789 Newsy Science
A Root Cause Of Schizophrenia May Have Finally Been Found - Newsy
 
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For the first time, scientists have pinpointed a single gene that can shape a person's risk of developing schizophrenia. See more at http://www.newsy.com/ Follow Eugene Daniels: http://www.twitter.com/eugenedaniels2 Sources: Wikimedia Commons https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:MIT_Broad_Center.jpg Salk Institute for Biological Studies https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IU7iAf-YSFg National Institutes of Health https://visualsonline.cancer.gov/details.cfm?imageid=2129 Videoblocks https://www.videoblocks.com/video/Students-Walking-Into-School-3ErlwKZ/ Videoblocks https://www.videoblocks.com/video/dna-helix-animation/ Wikimedia Commons https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Multidendritic-sensory-neurons-in-the-adult-Drosophila-abdomen-origins-dendritic-morphology-and-1749-8104-4-37-S1.ogv Videoblocks https://www.videoblocks.com/video/firing-neurons/ EurekAlert! http://www.eurekalert.org/multimedia/pub/107629.php Broad Institute https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s0y4equOTLg Image via: Gerry Shaw / CC BY SA 3.0 https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Neuron_in_tissue_culture.jpg
Views: 3872 Newsy Science
NASA Says A Fireball Crashed Into The Atlantic, But No One Noticed - Newsy
 
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According to a report from NASA, an exceptionally bright meteor likely exploded over the South Atlantic Ocean earlier this month. Transcript: If we had to guess, you probably don't recall anything major happening on Feb. 6 of this year. But, according to a report from NASA, if you lived in the middle of the Atlantic Ocean, you would remember it. The NASA/JPL Near-Earth Object Fireball page recorded a sizable event occurring at 1:55 p.m. At that time, the entry says an exceptionally bright meteor, known as a fireball or a bolide, zoomed into Earth's atmosphere and likely exploded over the South Atlantic Ocean. And the calculated total impact energy released from that explosion was reportedly about what you'd get if you detonated 13,000 tons of TNT. Now, that sounds like a pretty big deal. But as far as meteor impacts go, this one was pretty tiny. To put things into perspective, researchers say the meteor that exploded over Chelyabinsk, Russia, in 2013 was equivalent to the detonation of about 500,000 tons of TNT. As an astronomy blogger for Slate put it, "Events this size aren't too big a concern. Had it happened over a populated area, it would've rattled some windows and probably terrified a lot of people, but I don't think it would've done any real damage." This video includes clips from Euronews. Sources: NASA http://neo.jpl.nasa.gov/fireballs/ Google https://www.google.com/maps/place/30%C2%B024'00.0%22S+25%C2%B030'00.0%22W/@-30.4,-43.4296862,4z/data=!4m2!3m1!1s0x0:0x0 The Guardian https://www.theguardian.com/science/2013/nov/06/chelyabinsk-meteor-russia Euronews https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n1TL_jaVijY Slate http://www.slate.com/blogs/bad_astronomy/2016/02/20/fireball_over_atlantic_ocean_on_february_6_2016.html ------------------------------------- Newsy is your source for concise, unbiased video news and analysis covering the top stories from around the world. With persistent curiosity and no agenda, we strive to fuel meaningful conversations by highlighting multiple sides of every story. Newsy delivers the news and perspective you need without the hype and bias common to many news sources. See more at http://www.newsy.com/ Like Newsy on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/newsyvideos/
Views: 20107 Newsy Science
When Owls Bob Their Heads, They're Not Trying To Be Creepy - Newsy
 
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Part of the reason owls bob their heads so often is because their eyes are stuck in a fixed position, but there's more to it than just that. See more at http://www.newsy.com/ Follow Mikah Sargent: http://www.twitter.com/MikahSargent Sources: Videoblocks https://www.videoblocks.com/video/ecuador-owls/ BirdNote http://birdnote.org/show/why-do-owls-bob-their-heads/ Peace River Wildlife Center https://www.youtube.com/watch/ Videoblocks https://www.videoblocks.com/video/zoom-out-from-stationary-tree-owl/ International Owl Center https://www.youtube.com/watch/ Blandford Nature Center https://www.youtube.com/watch/ Stanford University https://web.stanford.edu/group/stanfordbirds/text/essays/Hawk-Eyed.html/ Videoblocks https://www.videoblocks.com/video/hawk-flying-over-forest-in-autumn/ Image via:
Views: 9820 Newsy Science
Medical Experts Are Declaring War On The 'War On Drugs' - Newsy
 
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A Johns Hopkins University and Lancet commission on drug policy and health says the war on drugs has harmed public health. Transcript: "Just as the alcohol drinker who finds himself needing a drink more and more frequently is the warning sign of his dependency, so it is with the pothead. The more he needs the escape from reality or the pleasure of marijuana, the more he is becoming emotionally dependent exactly as the square and un-hip alcoholic adult does," said Sonny Bono in a government-sponsored video about marijuana. Times have changed and so have our social and scientific understanding of drugs and drug policy. After reviewing global data, studying mathematical models and completing several other means of analysis, a Johns Hopkins University-Lancet Commission on Drug Policy and Health — a group of 22 leading experts in diverse professions — concluded current international drug policy is detrimental to public health. The commission says, "[Current drug policies] have contributed directly and indirectly to lethal violence, communicable-disease transmission, discrimination, forced displacement, unnecessary physical pain, and the undermining of people's right to health." Laid out in a 54-page document, the commission found drug policing contributes to an increase in HIV and hepatitis C infections. It also found that women are more likely to be incarcerated for drug infractions, and drug prohibition can actually contribute to overdose risk and deaths. The group argues much of the problem centers around the lack of a scientific approach to drug policymaking. To improve public health and strike a balance between scientific- and human-rights-based drug policy, the commission listed a number of recommendations for policy changes. It suggested, in part, decriminalizing minor, nonviolent drug offenses; phasing out military involvement in drug policing; reducing the negative effects of drug policy on women and moving toward a regulated drug market. The commission has published its findings and recommendations ahead of an April 19 session of the United Nations where the general assembly will meet to discuss "the world drug problem." This video includes clips from the National Archives and Records Administration, FloatBy / CC BY 3.0, Denver Police / CC BY 3.0, National Geographic, Grow420Guide / CC BY 3.0 and the United Nations. Sources: The U.S. National Archives and Records Administration https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QNKUuF4iAlI Getty Images http://www.gettyimages.com/license/52983206 The Lancet http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S014067361600619X United Nations http://www.unodc.org/ungass2016/ National Geographic https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RfGZtt9PbDA United Nations https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4Ljp-0fMN5Y ------------------------------------- Newsy is your source for concise, unbiased video news and analysis covering the top stories from around the world. With persistent curiosity and no agenda, we strive to fuel meaningful conversations by highlighting multiple sides of every story. Newsy delivers the news and perspective you need without the hype and bias common to many news sources. See more at http://www.newsy.com/ Like Newsy on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/newsyvideos/
Views: 1649 Newsy Science
A Boy's Love Of Disney Was The Key To New Autism Therapy - Newsy
 
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Transcript: In the documentary "Life, Animated," Ron Suskind remembers every detail of the first conversation he ever had with his son. "I see Owen on the bed, flipping through a Disney book," he says. "I see Iago, the puppet. ... I grab the puppet; I pull it up to my elbow. ... And Owen turns to the puppet. ... and I say to him, 'Owen, Owen, how does it feel to be you?'" "Not good because I don't have any friends," Owen Suskind replied at the time. Ron and his son talked for another minute, and Owen even quoted one of Jafar's lines from "Aladdin.""That was the breakthrough," Ron says. His son was 6 years old at the time. Like 1 in 68 kids today, Owen grew up with autism spectrum disorder. Ron saw Disney as a bridge into his son's world. "We were taught by therapists that these are obsessions. This is the way people in autism thought about it for a long time: 'Wean the kid off of it; it's not productive,'" he said in an interview. The Suskinds didn't follow this advice. They mixed "Disney therapy" with traditional behavioral and cognitive therapies. Speech language pathologist Michelle Garcia Winner, who worked with Owen to help prepare him for independence, also used Disney in her therapy. "A way to get Owen to learn is really by focusing a lot of learning around the thing he's going to pay attention to and actually seeking to learn on his own, which is Disney," she says. Owen now works at a local movie theater and has his own apartment. He hopes to join the Disney animation team someday. "Life, Animated" director Roger Ross Williams says: "I think Owen will always make sense of the world using Disney films. That's how he taught himself to read; that's how he taught himself to understand emotion because the expressions in Disney characters are big, and they have big eyes, and they're bigger than life." MIT and Yale are now researching affinity therapy, a term the Suskinds coined."Life, Animated" will be released in July. Sources: The Orchard http://www.lifeanimateddoc.com/film/ The Orchard http://www.lifeanimateddoc.com/film/ CBS https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vfnqz2zag68 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention http://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/autism/data.html NBCUniversal https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GApmY-JTZr0 Walt Disney Animation Studios https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zh8ARfIbuwo Walt Disney Animation Studios https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QapaqcDucmg CBS https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vfnqz2zag68 Comedy Central https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yjrIeFa4-ts Owen's Disney Club https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5jeK44pBnbs Massachusetts Institute of Technology https://iacc.hhs.gov/non-iacc-events/2014/nimh_lecture_ron_suskind_042414.pdf Deseret News http://www.deseretnews.com/article/865646108/Affinity-and-beyond-Sundance-film-explores-new-possibilities-for-autism-therapy.html?pg=all The Orchard http://www.lifeanimateddoc.com/ ------------------------------------- Newsy is your source for concise, unbiased video news and analysis covering the top stories from around the world. With persistent curiosity and no agenda, we strive to fuel meaningful conversations by highlighting multiple sides of every story. Newsy delivers the news and perspective you need without the hype and bias common to many news sources. See more at http://www.newsy.com/ Like Newsy on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/newsyvideos/
Views: 1935 Newsy Science
A Group Of Gamers Just Published A Molecular Biology Breakthrough - Newsy
 
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A research paper published in the Journal of Molecular Biology was authored not by scientists but by hardcore fans of a science video game. See more at http://www.newsy.com/ Follow Katie Link: http://www.twitter.com/Katie_Link Sources: Videoblocks https://www.videoblocks.com/video/close-up-of-lab-technician-using-touch-screen-on-tablet-computer-gHYLmmO/ Microsoft https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wJAix3h-1DM Nature https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cK-OGB1_ELE YouTube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b96fAWgjR6c SETI Institute https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_i1Yi3iI_i4 Stanford University https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7sJx9z1uB9k YouTube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SPMMKFX78x0 YouTube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gk8JwvtVs38 Microsoft https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZVZm85lI5QI YouTube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i-ArwCbkgDk Image via: Getty Images / Andreas Rentz http://www.gettyimages.com/license/89784145
Views: 1644 Newsy Science
Want To Live Forever? We Should Cure Aging - Newsy
 
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This debate short is part of a series co-produced by Intelligence Squared U.S. and Newsy. See more at http://www.newsy.com/ Follow Elizabeth Hagedorn: http://www.twitter.com/elizhagedorn Sources: Intelligence Squared U.S. http://intelligencesquaredus.org/ Image via: Getty Images / Christopher Furlong http://www.gettyimages.com/license/454966920
Views: 1075 Newsy Science
The Benefits Of Plants Go Well Beyond Photosynthesis - Newsy
 
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Transcript: Plants are nice. They replenish the planet's oxygen, which is useful. But a growing body of research suggests having plants nearby could be good for public health, home prices and even your self-esteem at work. For starters, plants scrub the air clean. According to one study, air filtration from forests prevented nearly $7 billion in U.S. health care costs in 2010. A study of more than 100,000 women in the U.S. found those who lived in the greenest surroundings had mortality rates as much as 12 percent lower than those in less-green areas. Another found green spaces were associated with decreased likelihood of preterm births. They can make neighborhoods more desirable. In one study in Philadelphia, planting trees correlated with a 2 percent increase in sale prices of nearby homes. Greening up vacant lots was associated with a reduction in gun violence. Just 10 more trees per block in Toronto correlated with a significant improvement in quality of life over less-green areas. As one of the researchers on that study told The New Yorker: "To get an equivalent increase with money, you'd have to give each household in that neighborhood ten thousand dollars—or make people seven years younger." It sounds almost too good to be true, and most of the studies can't pin down if plants alone make the difference. But you can try to get some of the benefits without giving your whole neighborhood a makeover. Research suggests even a lowly potted plant on your desk can help lower blood pressure and boost productivity and job satisfaction compared to a greenery-free environment. Sources: Videoblocks https://www.videoblocks.com/video/aerial-shot-of-forest-and-mountains-and-fields/ Environmental Pollution http://www.fs.fed.us/nrs/pubs/jrnl/2014/nrs_2014_nowak_001.pdf U.S. Forest Service https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w2DIzeIqX-A Videoblocks https://www.videoblocks.com/video/family-hiking-in-arches-national-park-utah-ut_anp_sa_hikers_01/ Environmental Health Perspectives http://ehp.niehs.nih.gov/1308049/ U.S. Forest Service https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qlbidNu9tgo Social Science Research Network http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=1127944 American Journal of Epidemiology http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3224254/ Flickr https://www.flickr.com/photos/luciuskwok/4125559043 Flickr https://www.flickr.com/photos/michaelwm25/2411335332 Scientific Reports http://www.nature.com/articles/srep11610 YouTube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FGIe749Et7M The New Yorker http://www.newyorker.com/tech/elements/what-is-a-tree-worth Videoblocks https://www.videoblocks.com/video/areial-view-of-central-park-nestled-in-new-york-city/ HortScience http://hortsci.ashspublications.org/content/42/3/581.full ------------------------------------- Newsy is your source for concise, unbiased video news and analysis covering the top stories from around the world. With persistent curiosity and no agenda, we strive to fuel meaningful conversations by highlighting multiple sides of every story. Newsy delivers the news and perspective you need without the hype and bias common to many news sources. See more at http://www.newsy.com/ Like Newsy on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/newsyvideos/
Views: 1201 Newsy Science
Scientists Shatter The Magic Of Cinderella's Glass Slippers - Newsy
 
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Researchers calculated the force it would take to break the glass shoe, as well as the maximum heel height. See more at http://www.newsy.com/ Follow Jamal Andress: http://www.twitter.com/jamalandress Sources: Disney https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1i8XVQ2pswg Walt Disney Studios Motion Pictures https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=20DF6U1HcGQ Getty Images http://www.gettyimages.com/detail/news-photo/s-today-co-hosts-savannah-guthrie-and-tamron-hall-at-the-news-photo/450772308 Image via: Newsy http://newsy.com
Views: 1519 Newsy Science
Saving Trees Could Also Save the World's Last Tigers - Newsy
 
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A new study shows there's still time to double the world's tiger population by 2022 if we repair and protect their habitat. Transcript: Tigers are already some of the rarest cats on the planet. Conservationists estimate some 3,500 remain in the wild. Nations and conservation groups have committed to doubling tiger populations by 2022, with an initiative called Tx2. And a new study checking on Tx2's progress confirms tigers can bounce back — as long as we minimize the damage to their habitat between now and then. Researchers analyzed changes in tree cover and found between 2001 and 2014, tiger habitat shrank by 7.7 percent. That rate is only expected to increase as the economies of these tiger-hosting regions accelerate. The researchers say several things need to happen if the cats are going to recover. Essential territory that's already deforested would have to be restored, and priority habitat would need to be preserved. And tiger-hosting nations would have to turn to green infrastructure and operate "essential translocation and reintroduction programs." The tree cover tracking in this study could eventually supplement efforts to monitor tigers. It can't fight poaching or count the prey animals tigers depend on for food, but the forests are easy to watch over time and can give us important feedback for the cats that live there. This video includes clips from the World Wildlife Fund, Yorkshire Wildlife Park, the International Fund for Animal Welfare, Indonesia Nature Film Society / CC BY 3.0 and the Environmental Justice Foundation / CC BY 3.0 and images from Sumeet Moghe / CC BY SA 3.0. Music is from "Burner" by Birocratic (http://birocratic.bandcamp.com). Sources: Wikimedia Commons https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/9/9e/Panthera_tigris_altaica_13_-_Buffalo_Zoo.jpg International Union for Conservation of Nature http://www.iucnredlist.org/details/15955/0 World Wildlife Fund http://tigers.panda.org/tx2/ World Wildlife Fund https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cSwC_o9vnSs Science http://advances.sciencemag.org/content/2/4/e1501675 Global Forest Watch http://www.globalforestwatch.org/map/4/14.88/90.35/ALL/positron/loss?tab=basemaps-tab&begin=2001-01-01&end=2015-01-01&threshold=30 YouTube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X9TYxff0ITU World Wildlife Fund https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fu-6taW9JNk International Fund for Animal Welfare https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wDkZEUGRzMQ YouTube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nf0QngPEdPk YouTube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j6GXLb5GegQ Wikimedia Commons https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Flehmen_Response_in_a_Sub_Adult_Tiger.jpg ------------------------------------- Newsy is your source for concise, unbiased video news and analysis covering the top stories from around the world. With persistent curiosity and no agenda, we strive to fuel meaningful conversations by highlighting multiple sides of every story. Newsy delivers the news and perspective you need without the hype and bias common to many news sources. See more at http://www.newsy.com/ Like Newsy on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/newsyvideos/
Views: 1234 Newsy Science
Researchers Say Horses Can Recognize Our Facial Expressions - Newsy
 
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A new study indicates horses may be able to recognize human emotions. See more at http://www.newsy.com/ Follow Katie Link: http://www.twitter.com/katie_link Sources: Biology Letters http://rsbl.royalsocietypublishing.org/ Getty Images http://www.gettyimages.com/license/52193266 Getty Images http://www.gettyimages.com/license/52259112 Getty Images http://www.gettyimages.com/license/457937652 University of Sussex http://www.sussex.ac.uk/broadcast/read/34197 Videoblocks https://www.videoblocks.com/video/horses-in-countryside/ Videoblocks https://www.videoblocks.com/video/Dog-Chews-On-Stick-grVKAdF/ Getty Images http://www.gettyimages.com/license/97016732 Videoblocks https://www.videoblocks.com/video/Close-Up-On-Horse-In-Corral-49SGybk/ Videoblocks https://www.videoblocks.com/video/Cowboy-Pets-Horse-3cmffKW/ Image via: Getty Images / Julian Herbert http://www.gettyimages.com/license/52259112
Views: 2516 Newsy Science
Blue Origin Says Spaceflight Isn't A Race, But It Sure Seems Like One - Newsy
 
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Blue Origin founder Jeff Bezos expects to take tourists to space by 2018 but says safety is the priority and being first is icing on the cake. Transcript: Blue Origin thinks it will take tourists to space by 2018. Founder Jeff Bezos said if testing for its New Shepard rocket goes well, recreational spaceflight could be here in a few short years. Bezos told reporters: "I want us to be safe. If we end up being first, that would be fine. But that's not the goal." So basically, Bezos is saying safety is key and spaceflight isn't a race, but sometimes, it sure feels like one. For instance, Bezos' remarks come less than a month after Virgin Galactic unveiled the second model of its commercial spacecraft, the VSS Unity. Virgin Galactic is also hoping to take tourists on brief flights to space one day for $250,000 a ticket. Blue Origin's development of a re-usable rocket is also happening alongside SpaceX's attempts to do the same. Blue Origin has actually managed to land a rocket successfully, then re-launch that same rocket and return it to Earth again. SpaceX has re-landed a rocket of its own but only one time. Although, its Falcon 9 is larger and goes farther than Blue Origin's test rocket, and the landing conditions are quite a bit different. So maybe Blue Origin isn't seeing this as a race, but with all these companies sharing similar goals, it looks an awful lot like they're competing to be first. Plus being the first on the market seems a bit more important when tourists are buying tickets to space that cost as much as a house. This video includes clips from Blue Origin. Sources: Blue Origin https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rEdk-XNoZpA The Washington Post https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/the-switch/wp/2016/03/08/why-jeff-bezos-is-finally-ready-to-talk-about-taking-people-to-space/?hpid=hp_hp-more-top-stories_blue-origin-730pm%3Ahomepage%2Fstory Blue Origin https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2DlIaQfOyYU Virgin Galactic https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Eahj_H5gVw Virgin Galactic https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M7YSXO3nIaE Blue Origin https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=74tyedGkoUc SpaceX https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ANv5UfZsvZQ ------------------------------------- Newsy is your source for concise, unbiased video news and analysis covering the top stories from around the world. With persistent curiosity and no agenda, we strive to fuel meaningful conversations by highlighting multiple sides of every story. Newsy delivers the news and perspective you need without the hype and bias common to many news sources. See more at http://www.newsy.com/ Like Newsy on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/newsyvideos/
Views: 3121 Newsy Science
Doctors Can Now Diagnose Concussions With Just A Blood Test - Newsy
 
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Concussions are one of the thorniest issues facing sports today. But an Orlando, Florida, doctor may have just changed the game of how head injuries are diagnosed. A new study in the Journal of the American Medical Association Neurology shows there’s a protein released into your bloodstream after a head injury, and doctors can detect it up to a week later. This is huge news because, unlike most other injuries, doctors mostly rely on the person experiencing the concussion to relay their symptoms. Doctors can order a CT scan to check for brain injury, but they generally try to avoid it. "You really want to minimize the amount of CTs that you do on your patients, particularly children, because they are a lot more sensitive to radiation and the bad side effects," Dr. Linda Papa said. The blood test has no such side effects. Not to mention it’s about as accurate as a CT scan and could provide a much cheaper alternative. Making concussions easier to diagnose can help doctors treat them and stave off lingering effects, like dizziness, memory loss and depression, especially since symptoms don't always appear right away. Researchers hope the test will help doctors treat kids who have a hard time explaining their symptoms. But it could also help diagnose athletes who are intentionally keeping their symptoms a secret. Currently, the NFL has players take a memory test before the season. They take a similar test after a suspected head injury. If their second score is worse than their first, the player is diagnosed with a concussion and is forced to sit out until they’re better. But that may not be the most effective method. Several former players, including Peyton Manning, have admitted to intentionally scoring low on the first test so they won’t have to risk sitting out. It would be considerably harder to fake a blood test. Doctors hope the test will someday be as simple to use as a diabetes blood sugar test. This video includes clips from Orlando Health and images from Getty Images. Sources: Neurology http://archneur.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?articleid=2506517 EurekAlert! http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2016-03/m-ssb032516.php Videoblocks https://www.videoblocks.com/video/man-rubbing-his-temples-with-a-headache-lbtiuma/ NFL http://www.nfl.com/news/story/09000d5d81f83fbc/article/manning-admits-underperforming-on-baseline-concussion-tests Twitter https://twitter.com/MattBowen41/status/61414449977892864 Pro Football Talk http://profootballtalk.nbcsports.com/2013/07/18/jeff-hartings-says-he-faked-his-way-through-concussion-tests/ Getty Images http://www.gettyimages.com/license/187611952 ------------------------------------- Newsy is your source for concise, unbiased video news and analysis covering the top stories from around the world. With persistent curiosity and no agenda, we strive to fuel meaningful conversations by highlighting multiple sides of every story. Newsy delivers the news and perspective you need without the hype and bias common to many news sources. See more at http://www.newsy.com/ Like Newsy on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/newsyvideos/
Views: 4324 Newsy Science
This Newly Discovered Strain Of Bacteria Can Eat Plastic - Newsy
 
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Transcript: There may be a new way to accelerate plastic decomposition, and it involves bacteria. A new study from Japanese scientists says a new strain of bacteria found outside a recycling facility eats plastic. It can take hundreds of years for plastic to naturally break down. And considering researchers believe there will be more plastic in the ocean than fish by the year 2050, that's a problem. The newly discovered bacteria eats a type of plastic found in many everyday products, such as water bottles. And for low-quality plastic, the strain could consume it in about six weeks. There are still some issues that require further research on the topic, like how to adhere the bacteria to large amounts of plastic. Some also worry that possible toxins could be released from decomposition. While the study focused on a new strain of bacteria, it isn't the first time scientists have discovered new ways to degrade plastics. In September, one study found certain types of plastic, like Styrofoam, could be the next meal for some larvae. And researchers have been working for years to develop plastic that's degradable by water. Sources: Getty Images http://www.gettyimages.com/license/94179135 Science http://science.sciencemag.org/content/351/6278/1196.full Arirang https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ovpXKAc51Qw Videoblocks https://www.videoblocks.com/video/young-man-drinking-water-while-sitting-by-the-tree-in-park-hzaxtoq/ Videoblocks https://www.videoblocks.com/video/pouring-garbage/ Getty Images http://www.gettyimages.com/license/457939105 Videoblocks https://www.videoblocks.com/video/crashing-pacific-ocean-wave/ ------------------------------------- Newsy is your source for concise, unbiased video news and analysis covering the top stories from around the world. With persistent curiosity and no agenda, we strive to fuel meaningful conversations by highlighting multiple sides of every story. Newsy delivers the news and perspective you need without the hype and bias common to many news sources. See more at http://www.newsy.com/ Like Newsy on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/newsyvideos/
Views: 4209 Newsy Science
Here's More Evidence That Common Drugs May Cause Cognition Issues - Newsy
 
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Transcript: Taking pills to tame your allergy symptoms or to get some sleep may not be as harmless as you once thought. Building on past research, a new study suggests anticholinergic drugs are linked to cognitive impairment and an increased risk of dementia. Anticholinergic drugs include both over-the-counter and prescription medications. We're talking about drugs like Benadryl, Dimetapp and Unisom — chances are you have at least one of these types of drugs in your medicine cabinet. A link between these types of drugs and cognitive impairment isn't a totally new discovery, but for the first time, researchers used brain imaging techniques to determine the physical changes associated with these drugs. More than 400 participants, with an average age of 73, were given memory and cognitive tests, PET scans and MRI scans. Participants who were taking anticholinergic drugs didn't do as well on memory tests and had lower levels of brain activity than those who weren't. A researcher told CNN, "Given all the research evidence, physicians might want to consider alternatives to anticholinergic medications, if available, when working with older patients." Sources: Videoblocks https://www.videoblocks.com/video/man-pouring-pills-into-hand-vanp0of/ JAMA http://i2.cdn.turner.com/cnn/2016/images/04/18/risacheretal_jamaneurology_final_inpress_041116.pdf Videoblocks https://www.videoblocks.com/video/doctor-talking-to-patient-using-a-tablet-to-explain-her-condition-the-grandson-is-there-for-support-and-to-listen-to-what-the-doctor-is-saying-al30ers/ Videoblocks https://www.videoblocks.com/video/man-choosing-pills-from-medicine-cabinet-hnyz3mj/ Getty Images http://www.gettyimages.com/license/181192899 Alzheimer's Association http://www.alzheimersanddementia.com/article/S1552-5260(12)00081-7/pdf Videoblocks https://www.videoblocks.com/video/doctors-in-hospital-examining-mri-scan-t3sgxl7/ Videoblocks https://www.videoblocks.com/video/female-doctor-listening-to-patient-aegewwa/ CNN http://www.cnn.com/2016/04/18/health/otc-anticholinergic-drugs-dementia/ ------------------------------------- Newsy is your source for concise, unbiased video news and analysis covering the top stories from around the world. With persistent curiosity and no agenda, we strive to fuel meaningful conversations by highlighting multiple sides of every story. Newsy delivers the news and perspective you need without the hype and bias common to many news sources. See more at http://www.newsy.com/ Like Newsy on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/newsyvideos/
Views: 3647 Newsy Science
After 45 Years, OSHA Lowers Limit Of Cancer-Causing Dust - Newsy
 
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Crystalline silica is found in everyday materials, but it can cause health problems for workers exposed to it on a regular basis. Transcript: We're talking specifically about crystalline silica. It's a mineral found in everyday materials such as roads and buildings, but it's a known cancer-causing substance. The new limit from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration is 50 micrograms per cubic meter of air, on average, over an eight-hour shift. The previous limit, in place since 1971, was 250 micrograms for construction and 100 micrograms for other industries. The new requirement takes effect on June 23, but the three industry groups affected by the ruling — construction, general industry and maritime and hydraulic fracturing — have between one and five years to be fully compliant. For construction employers, compliance means controlling silica dust with water or ventilation, providing masks when needed, limiting high exposure and providing medical exams. NBC reports that industry groups fought against the lower limit, saying the new rule would be impossible to comply with and could cost businesses billions. OSHA estimates the lower silica limit will save 600 lives and prevent 900 illnesses every year. Sources: We're talking specifically about crystalline silica. It's a mineral found in everyday materials such as roads and buildings, but it's a known cancer-causing substance. The new limit from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration is 50 micrograms per cubic meter of air, on average, over an eight-hour shift. The previous limit, in place since 1971, was 250 micrograms for construction and 100 micrograms for other industries. The new requirement takes effect on June 23, but the three industry groups affected by the ruling — construction, general industry and maritime and hydraulic fracturing — have between one and five years to be fully compliant. For construction employers, compliance means controlling silica dust with water or ventilation, providing masks when needed, limiting high exposure and providing medical exams. NBC reports that industry groups fought against the lower limit, saying the new rule would be impossible to comply with and could cost businesses billions. OSHA estimates the lower silica limit will save 600 lives and prevent 900 illnesses every year. ------------------------------------- Newsy is your source for concise, unbiased video news and analysis covering the top stories from around the world. With persistent curiosity and no agenda, we strive to fuel meaningful conversations by highlighting multiple sides of every story. Newsy delivers the news and perspective you need without the hype and bias common to many news sources. See more at http://www.newsy.com/ Like Newsy on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/newsyvideos/
Views: 1275 Newsy Science
This Supernova Is 570 Billion Times Brighter Than The Sun - Newsy
 
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A supernova discovered last year turned out to be the brightest ever recorded — twice as bright as the previous record-holder. See more at http://www.newsy.com/ Follow Newsy: http://www.twitter.com/NewysVideos Sources: NASA https://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/cgi-bin/details.cgi?aid=11447 NASA https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6tmbeLTHC_0 NASA http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/GLAST/science/milky_way_galaxy.html Videoblocks https://www.videoblocks.com/video/star-filled-sky-timelapse/ NASA http://www.nasa.gov/vision/universe/watchtheskies/double_burst.html NASA http://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/5-8/features/nasa-knows/what-is-a-supernova.html Image via: Wayne Rosing
Views: 30066 Newsy Science
Laundry Pods Are Convenient, But They're Still Dangerous For Kids
 
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"As soon as they pop that container, it squirts into the back of their throat, and the game is over," Dr. Gary Smith said. While it's true laundry pods are far more convenient than traditional detergent — you just drop one into your washing machine and go on about your day — that convenience is a trade-off. "We live in a world that has been designed by adults for the convenience of adults," Smith said. "It's not until we start to see the serious consequences or unfortunately even deaths of children before we react." See, laundry packets and pods have a problem: In the eyes of a child, they kind of look like they might be tasty. It's also more heavily concentrated than traditional detergent. "Every 45 minutes in this country, a child is exposed and a call is made to a poison control center because of an exposure to a laundry detergent packet," Smith said. "We've even had two deaths in the last two years. ... That never occurred in the two decades that I've seen children prior to that due to traditional laundry detergent." Makers of laundry pods have tried to make them safer; in September 2015, the companies voluntarily agreed on a set of safety standards. • The pods now have a stronger film with an additive that makes them taste repulsive. • The containers they come in are no longer see-through and require more skill to open. • The product features warning labels and safety information about the dangers of ingesting the pods. The researchers say they're keeping a close eye on how the new regulations affect the number of exposures. "If those numbers don't go down, that voluntary standard either needs to be strengthened or these products simply need to be taken off the market," Smith said. Smith recommends parents opt for traditional laundry detergent — the study found it to be far safer than laundry pods. If you do choose to use laundry pods, he recommends keeping them out of children's sight. Newsy is your source for concise, unbiased video news and analysis covering the top stories from around the world. With persistent curiosity and no agenda, we strive to fuel meaningful conversations by highlighting multiple sides of every story. Newsy delivers the news and perspective you need without the hype and bias common to many news sources. See more at http://www.newsy.com/ Like Newsy on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/newsyvideos/
Views: 6141 Newsy Science
A Massive Coral Reef Discovered Near The Amazon Is Already In Danger
 
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A gigantic stretch of coral reef has just been discovered at the mouth of the Amazon River by an international team of scientists. The 600-mile-long area of reef went unnoticed until now since coral usually survives best in clear waters. The Amazon's water, on the other hand, is some of the dirtiest in the world.  The location is even more surprising, since areas where fresh and salt water meet are usually where there are gaps in coral reefs.  This newly discovered stretch could change what scientists know about how reefs form.  But already the researchers say the reef and its wildlife are in danger. One said in a press release ocean acidification and warming are major threats.  And the Brazilian government already sold a significant part of the area for oil exploration and drilling.  As of now, this reef is pretty abundant with life –– with 60 different species of sponges and over 70 species of fish and crustaceans.  Time will tell if oil exploration is scaled back because of the find. Cases of the practice contaminating the Amazon River have been found in the past. Brazil's state-run oil company has been plagued with scandal, but the country's economy also largely depends on the oil industry.  This video includes clips from CCTV, Moura Et Al. / Science Advances, The Economist, Discovery and National Geographic, and images from Getty Images, NASA, the University of Georgia and Lance Willis.  Newsy is your source for concise, unbiased video news and analysis covering the top stories from around the world. With persistent curiosity and no agenda, we strive to fuel meaningful conversations by highlighting multiple sides of every story. Newsy delivers the news and perspective you need without the hype and bias common to many news sources. See more at http://www.newsy.com/ Like Newsy on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/newsyvideos/
Views: 2872 Newsy Science
You've Got At Least 30 Species Of Bug At Home - Newsy
 
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A team of researchers has been scouring American homes to learn more about the bugs we live with. Turns out, we're never home alone. See more at http://www.newsy.com/ Follow Zach Toombs: http://www.twitter.com/ZachToombs Sources: Videoblocks https://www.videoblocks.com/video/large-grasshopper-crawling-along/ Videoblocks https://www.videoblocks.com/video/Macro-shot-of-insect-on-broom-Uy6q-pF/ Videoblocks https://www.videoblocks.com/video/sweeping-suburban-homes-aerial-2/ Videoblocks https://www.videoblocks.com/video/lovely-suburban-homes/ TED Conferences https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jkc4Zbux4Go Rob Dunn Lab | North Carolina State University http://robdunnlab.com/projects/arthropods-of-our-homes/ Untamed Science https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_WWcbIsu3V4 U.S. Department of Agriculture https://www.flickr.com/photos/usdagov/8674435033/ Flickr https://www.flickr.com/photos/sanmartin/5247992288/ Flickr https://www.flickr.com/photos/andybadger/7019143979/ Flickr https://www.flickr.com/photos/andybadger/7905171438/in/photolist-d3y54h Pixabay https://pixabay.com/en/moth-large-insect-brown-pattern-645820/ Pixabay https://pixabay.com/en/mosquito-macro-insect-bug-animal-719613/ Pixabay https://pixabay.com/en/ladybug-flight-beetle-insect-macro-743562/ Pixabay https://pixabay.com/en/wasp-insect-close-macro-summer-550631/ Pixabay https://pixabay.com/en/bug-bee-macro-nature-close-up-191085/ Wikimedia Commons https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Hadenoecus_subterraneus_(cave_cricket)_in_Great_Onyx_Cave_(Flint_Ridge,_Mammoth_Cave_National_Park,_Kentucky,_USA)_(8314210164).jpg Flickr https://www.flickr.com/photos/jsjgeology/16391144462/ Pixabay https://pixabay.com/en/earwig-insects-forticula-auriculata-560780/ Wikimedia Commons https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:K8085-6.jpg Pixabay https://pixabay.com/en/silverfish-vermin-animal-61638/ Wikimedia Commons https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Tick_(6885763639).jpg Pixabay https://pixabay.com/en/arthropods-cyanide-hydrogen-87721/ Pixabay https://pixabay.com/en/assel-terrestrial-isopod-oniscidea-167262/ Videoblocks https://www.videoblocks.com/video/homes-on-suburban-neighborhood-street/ WRAL http://www.wral.com/news/local/video/11252487/ Image via: Matt Bertone https://entomology.ces.ncsu.edu/profile/matt-bertone/
Views: 834 Newsy Science
Why The UK Wants You To Cut Back On The Booze (All Of It) - Newsy
 
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The U.K. changed its recommendation on how much alcohol you should consume after findings from a new cancer study were published. See more at http://www.newsy.com/ Follow Jay Strubberg: http://www.twitter.com/jaystrubberg Sources: BBC http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-35255384 Videoblocks http://www.videoblocks.com/video/grabbing-alcohol-bottle-off-shelf/ Getty Images http://www.gettyimages.com/detail/news-photo/russian-river-brewing-company-customer-takes-a-sip-of-the-news-photo/467650191 U.K. Department of Health https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/489795/summary.pdf Cancer Research UK http://www.cancerresearchuk.org/about-cancer/causes-of-cancer/alcohol-and-cancer/how-alcohol-causes-cancer Getty Images http://www.gettyimages.com/detail/news-photo/russian-river-brewing-company-customers-clink-their-glasses-news-photo/467650193 American Cancer Society http://www.cancer.org/cancer/cancercauses/dietandphysicalactivity/alcohol-use-and-cancer Videoblocks http://www.videoblocks.com/video/beer-pour-from-bar-tap-with-sound/ Getty Images http://www.gettyimages.com/detail/video/liquid-being-pored-into-shot-glasses-stock-video-footage/486388331 Getty Images http://www.gettyimages.com/detail/news-photo/bartender-at-hops-barley-brewpub-pours-a-pint-of-beer-on-news-photo/187774436 Getty Images http://www.gettyimages.com/detail/news-photo/people-taste-wine-at-the-vianasa-winery-may-16-2005-in-napa-news-photo/52836978 Image via: Getty Images / Jeff J Mitchell http://www.gettyimages.com/detail/news-photo/bottles-of-whisky-on-display-in-the-diageo-claive-vidiz-news-photo/486298872
Views: 918 Newsy Science
This Commonly Prescribed Drug Could Help Treat Autism
 
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Researchers at the University of Missouri are studying how a commonly prescribed beta blocker could be used to treat individuals with autism. "There was a study done in the 1980s that suggested a social and language benefit with this blood pressure drug, propranolol," Dr. David Beversdorf said. Propranolol has been used to treat high blood pressure and other cardiovascular diseases since the 1960s. Dr. David Beversdorf and his colleagues wanted to explore other possible uses for the drug. In their study, individuals with autism who took the drug instead of a placebo showed higher scores in social skills, such as eye contact, nonverbal communication and staying on topic. "We were initially looking at it because of its use for test anxiety. That's exactly the drug people take for public speaking anxiety, performance anxiety. ...  And then we started to look at it in autism because they have flexibility issues with social interaction," Beversdorf said. Propranolol is currently FDA-approved to treat a lot of things. Autism is not one of them. An Autism Treatment Network spokesperson said the organization welcomes the research but also warned it's still too early to start prescribing the drug to people with autism. This fall, researchers plan to conduct clinical trials that combine propranolol with early-intervention therapies. Beversdorf says the trial could take up to four years. This video includes images from Getty Images. Newsy is your source for concise, unbiased video news and analysis covering the top stories from around the world. With persistent curiosity and no agenda, we strive to fuel meaningful conversations by highlighting multiple sides of every story. Newsy delivers the news and perspective you need without the hype and bias common to many news sources. See more at http://www.newsy.com/ Like Newsy on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/newsyvideos/
Views: 1833 Newsy Science
Earth Hour Doesn't Help The Earth Very Much - Newsy
 
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On Saturday night, cities and people around the world turned off their lights for one hour in honor of Earth Hour, a nonprofit movement that asks people to think about how they use electricity. But what kind of impact does an hour without electricity actually have on the grid? Well, reports from around the world suggest that during that one hour, energy usage can drop significantly. For instance, London saw a drop in energy usage in 2013 equal to about 2,800 homes being taken off the grid. Similarly, Bangkok saw a reduction in carbon emissions of nearly 1,165 tons during this year's event. But those numbers can be a bit misleading, because while consumption might have dropped, that doesn't mean less energy was being pumped into the grid. Power plants have to anticipate future needs, and they know that after the hour passes, they're likely to see an increase in electricity usage. So they keep burning fuel during the event. Another problem occurs when everything is turned back on after the hour ends. When appliances are turned on, they require more energy to get started, reducing the net benefit of turning everything off for Earth Hour. At the end of the day, though, Earth Hour and the World Wildlife Fund both say that the event isn't about saving energy for that one hour but is instead about raising awareness. This video includes clips from Earth Hour and images from Getty Images. Sources: Earth Hour https://youtu.be/J4MnaKZ9Q64?list=PLmvfmQwUzzRGLd6UVAbK7sDBFUPXvPqWL Videoblocks https://www.videoblocks.com/video/closeup-of-isolated-power-plant-at-sunset/ The Energy Collective http://theenergycollective.com/sbattaglia/203061/earth-hour-2013-results-are Earth Hour https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t4eNRdo9zh8 The Nation http://www.nationmultimedia.com/breakingnews/Earth-Hour-in-Bangkok-saves-over-2000MW-30282032.html Earth Hour https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RH61RsbDOp4 Getty Images http://www.gettyimages.com/license/76412182 Forbes http://www.forbes.com/sites/forbesasia/2013/03/22/moving-beyond-the-symbolism-of-earth-hour/#52cbb5766bf6 Videoblocks https://www.videoblocks.com/video/closeup-of-isolated-power-plant-at-night-1/ The Telegraph http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/earth/environment/climatechange/7527469/Earth-Hour-will-not-cut-carbon-emissions.html Earth Hour https://youtu.be/h-qdjJWcx84?list=PLmvfmQwUzzRE3E4CIl9cgPYbgMqduzm33 Getty Images http://www.gettyimages.com/license/1104098 Getty Images http://www.gettyimages.com/license/142192412 ------------------------------------- Newsy is your source for concise, unbiased video news and analysis covering the top stories from around the world. With persistent curiosity and no agenda, we strive to fuel meaningful conversations by highlighting multiple sides of every story. Newsy delivers the news and perspective you need without the hype and bias common to many news sources. See more at http://www.newsy.com/ Like Newsy on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/newsyvideos/
Views: 696 Newsy Science
This Solar-Powered 'Sterile Box' Could Give The World Safer Surgeries - Newsy
 
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Rice University's Sterile Box can reportedly sanitize surgical equipment in areas without access to clean water. Transcript: "This is called the Rice Sterile Box, and we're an off-grid sterile processing unit," Doug Schuler of Rice University said. Even with the right doctors in place, many areas don't have clean enough water for safe surgeries. But what started out as a shipping container for researchers at Rice University could be a solution to that problem. The container can now filter water from sand and gravel and sanitize surgical instruments in an autoclave, an instrument that uses high-pressure chemical reactions. "We originally designed this not to use any power at all, or very minimal power. We morphed on to a solar PV solution. And probably the big benefit of solar PV solution is we have some electricity for non-sterilization factors, like charging cell phones and laptops," Schuler said. The researchers note roughly one-third of patients in low-resource settings develop infections at surgical sites. In developed countries, the figure is close to 4 percent. And more than three-quarters of a billion people across the world don't have access to water sources protected from outside contaminates. The original purpose of the project was reportedly just to make a sustainable autoclave to sterilize the equipment. But one of the study's authors said the solar-powered box now tackles the whole problem. "The proof is going to be when we take it into the field and evaluate it, and make sure that it works," one of the study's authors said. This video includes clips from UN Women, United Nations and UNICEF. Sources: Rice University https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rxZwu_W6ajU&feature=youtu.be UN Women https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JcF_puGBdmM Rice University http://news.rice.edu/2016/03/23/sterile-box-offers-safer-surgeries/ United Nations https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2jsQ4dwlZ0E Videoblocks https://www.videoblocks.com/video/anaesthesiologist-in-or-with-monitor-rjwlb2f/ Centers for Disease Control and Prevention http://www.cdc.gov/healthywater/global/assessing.html UNICEF https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s4NYfA2-KZM ------------------------------------- Newsy is your source for concise, unbiased video news and analysis covering the top stories from around the world. With persistent curiosity and no agenda, we strive to fuel meaningful conversations by highlighting multiple sides of every story. Newsy delivers the news and perspective you need without the hype and bias common to many news sources. See more at http://www.newsy.com/ Like Newsy on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/newsyvideos/
Views: 1421 Newsy Science
Scientists Discover Pluto's 'Little Sister' Makemake Has Its Own Moon - Newsy
 
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NASA announced Tuesday it discovered dwarf planet Makemake has its own moon. Researchers hope the finding will help shed light on Makemake's origins. Transcript: Pluto might not be a planet anymore, but at least it has some company at the edge of our solar system. In 2005, astronomers found a slightly smaller dwarf planet called Makemake in the Kuiper Belt in the outer reaches of the sun’s light. On Tuesday, NASA announced Makemake has a moon of its own. The moon is nicknamed MK 2, and astronomers first discovered it a year ago using the Hubble Telescope. It's about 100 miles in diameter and resides more than 4.2 billion miles away from the sun. Scientists believe it orbits about 13,000 miles away from Makemake, much closer than the average distance of 238,000 miles between our moon and the Earth. Finding the satellites and determining their mass can provide scientists with clues about how the celestial bodies were first formed. Scientists hugely overestimated Pluto’s size for decades until the discovery of its moon Charon shed new light on the dwarf planet in 1978. "The discovery of this moon has given us an opportunity to study Makemake in far greater detail than we ever would have been able to without the companion," researcher Alex Parker said. Scientists say they’ll need to do more research to learn more about MK 2’s orbit and composition. This video includes clips and images from NASA. Sources: NASA http://www.nasa.gov/feature/goddard/2016/hubble-discovers-moon-orbiting-the-dwarf-planet-makemake Space.com http://www.space.com/32702-dwarf-planet-makemake-moon-hubble-discovery.html NASA https://www.flickr.com/photos/nasahqphoto/19700445551 ------------------------------------- Newsy is your source for concise, unbiased video news and analysis covering the top stories from around the world. With persistent curiosity and no agenda, we strive to fuel meaningful conversations by highlighting multiple sides of every story. Newsy delivers the news and perspective you need without the hype and bias common to many news sources. See more at http://www.newsy.com/ Like Newsy on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/newsyvideos/
Views: 9277 Newsy Science
Do-It-Yourself Health Care Apps Are About As Safe As They Sound - Newsy
 
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Transcript: Health knowledge is a good thing, and smartphone apps make spreading information easier than ever. But some health apps promise to do things that are better left to professionals and tried-and-true hardware. Consider Instant Blood Pressure, an app that cruised to prominence on claims it could measure your blood pressure using your phone's camera and microphone. Researchers at Johns Hopkins University showed it was only 20 percent accurate. Or SkinVision, a melanoma-screening app that other researchers said could only spot dangerous skin melanomas one time out of 10. Or any of the others that make unproven mental health claims, like treating depression with a hypnosis app — for free, no less. As the Johns Hopkins researchers said of their analysis of Instant Blood Pressure, there's a "need for scientific validation and regulation of these apps before they reach consumers." But the medical community still doesn't know what form that regulation should take. In the same vein, all that wellness info your Fitbit gathers doesn't always mean much to your doctor. "My mom said: 'Well, I can't wait to get an Apple watch. I'm going to send all of my data, all of my step data and all of my blood data to my doctor. It's going to be fantastic,'" said WebMD's Ben Greenberg. Like most apps, most mainstream wearables aren't regulated like medical devices, and doctors say it's hard to put the data to medical use anyway. Self-tracking isn't as dangerous as potentially bad medical advice, but the point remains: Ask your doctor which gadgets and smartphone tools will actually be helpful — and what medical guidance you should leave to the pros. Sources: Instant Blood Pressure http://www.instantbloodpressure.com/ EurekAlert! http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2016-03/jhm-pbp022916.php American Academy of Dermatology http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0190962212011814 National Institutes of Health http://www.cancer.gov/types/skin/hp/melanoma-treatment-pdq Vimeo https://vimeo.com/127475391 iTunes https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/end-anxiety-hypnosis-free/id720652195?mt=8 Online Journal of Public Health Informatics http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3959919/#r94 New England Journal of Medicine http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMhle1403384 Videoblocks https://www.videoblocks.com/video/senior-man-getting-blood-pressure-checked-by-nurse-t52uhfh/ Fitbit https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J3S3cNv0ntE&index=3&list=PL_xLGCqFuhiE6ailQbZJ5ZOL2uveIuzRm Cleveland Clinic https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d6XkxujMIYo Food and Drug Administration http://www.fda.gov/downloads/medicaldevices/deviceregulationandguidance/guidancedocuments/ucm429674.pdf MIT Technology Review https://www.technologyreview.com/s/543716/your-doctor-doesnt-want-to-hear-about-your-fitness-tracker-data/ Apple https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rjH9EwiPSyk&list=PLHFlHpPjgk73J6C3PHUrDntzy6TQxBh44&index=6&nohtml5=False Jawbone https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pAKPASRRCLM&nohtml5=False ------------------------------------- Newsy is your source for concise, unbiased video news and analysis covering the top stories from around the world. With persistent curiosity and no agenda, we strive to fuel meaningful conversations by highlighting multiple sides of every story. Newsy delivers the news and perspective you need without the hype and bias common to many news sources. See more at http://www.newsy.com/ Like Newsy on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/newsyvideos/
Views: 695 Newsy Science
Report Says African Elephants Are Being Poached At An Alarming Rate - Newsy
 
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A new report says African elephant populations are still dwindling, specifically in Central and West Africa. Transcript: African elephant populations are continuing to dwindle, and a new report says poaching is to blame. The Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora has been tracking this. CITES says while poaching is down overall, the number of elephants dying at the hands of poachers is still larger than the number being born. High levels of poaching are still taking place in Central and West Africa, and the illegal ivory trade is a big incentive. CITES' data shows about 60 percent of elephant deaths are due to poaching, and the World Wildlife Fund estimates as many as 30,000 elephants are poached every year. South Africa was thrust into the spotlight in 2014 when an elephant was poached at Kruger National Park for the first time in a decade. And the numbers continued to increase from there. One side of the park borders Zimbabwe, a country where poaching is on the rise. The park itself is home to tens of thousands of elephants. A lot of the areas in which the study saw increases in poaching may be sustainable for the elephant population, but not long term. CITES' secretary general said the trend could be stopped, however. He said in a press release, "There are some encouraging signs, including in certain parts of Eastern Africa, such as Tsavo in Kenya, where the overall poaching trends have declined, showing us all what is possible through a sustained and collective effort with strong political support." This video includes clips from CITES, World Wildlife Fund and Kruger National Park. Sources: Videoblocks https://www.videoblocks.com/video/elephants-drinking-water/ CITES https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dKGNJ_rS3_Y World Wildlife Fund https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=87v6_ytd3Ls Kruger National Park https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6YL3pRgioJk Videoblocks https://www.videoblocks.com/video/elephant-eating-leaves-94004-10/ Videoblocks https://www.videoblocks.com/video/elephant-in-the-water/ CITES https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9FeGjSrSdz8 ------------------------------------- Newsy is your source for concise, unbiased video news and analysis covering the top stories from around the world. With persistent curiosity and no agenda, we strive to fuel meaningful conversations by highlighting multiple sides of every story. Newsy delivers the news and perspective you need without the hype and bias common to many news sources. See more at http://www.newsy.com/ Like Newsy on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/newsyvideos/
Views: 1072 Newsy Science
Vitamin D Has 'Stunning' Effects On Heart Failure Patients - Newsy
 
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Transcript: You may have heard that vitamin D is good for bones and teeth, but new research suggests it can also help heal damaged hearts. Early findings from a study out of England's University of Leeds show that vitamin D-3 pills significantly improved heart function in patients with congestive heart failure, increasing the amount of blood the heart pumps with each beat by 8 percentage points. The researchers behind the study called the results "stunning" and unlike any treatment breakthrough of the past 15 years. For some patients, the vitamin could even replace implantable cardioverter defibrillators as a primary treatment of heart failure. Unlike ICDs, vitamin D is cheap, causes no side effects and doesn't require surgery. The study is still ongoing, but the early results are promising for the roughly 23 million people around the world affected by heart failure. For a natural boost, the human skin produces vitamin D during sun exposure. The "sunshine vitamin" can also be found in oily fish and eggs. Sources: BBC http://www.bbc.com/news/health-35959556 Videoblocks https://www.videoblocks.com/video/young-happy-farming-couple-watering-lettuce-produce-on-their-farm-with-sun-rays-8kctjt0/ Clinical Trials https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/study/NCT01619891?term=NCT01619891&rank=1 Videoblocks https://www.videoblocks.com/video/professional-doctor-showing-medication-pills-l9b67cp/ BBC http://www.bbc.com/news/health-35959556 Videoblocks https://www.videoblocks.com/video/close-up-of-lab-technician-using-touch-screen-on-tablet-computer-v0-0rf8/ Tech Times http://www.techtimes.com/articles/147251/20160405/vitamin-d-supplements-linked-to-improvements-in-heart-failure-patients.htm Science Daily https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/04/160404152900.htm American Heart Association http://circres.ahajournals.org/content/113/6/646.full Videoblocks https://www.videoblocks.com/video/germany-pfalz-old-couple-on-bench/ Tech Times http://www.techtimes.com/articles/147251/20160405/vitamin-d-supplements-linked-to-improvements-in-heart-failure-patients.htm Videoblocks https://www.videoblocks.com/video/jib-shot-of-couple-at-bryce-canyon-national-park-ut_bcnp_rim_jib_couple_02/ ------------------------------------- Newsy is your source for concise, unbiased video news and analysis covering the top stories from around the world. With persistent curiosity and no agenda, we strive to fuel meaningful conversations by highlighting multiple sides of every story. Newsy delivers the news and perspective you need without the hype and bias common to many news sources. See more at http://www.newsy.com/ Like Newsy on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/newsyvideos/
Views: 2189 Newsy Science
Your Deodorant May Be Messing With Your Body's Microbes - Newsy
 
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Deodorant keeps us smelling fresh, but it could also be messing with the natural microbes on our skin. See more at http://www.newsy.com/ Follow Katie Link: http://www.twitter.com/katie_link Sources: Getty Images http://www.gettyimages.com/license/75436592/ Getty Images http://www.gettyimages.com/license/75436592/ Secret https://www.youtube.com/watch/ PeerJ https://peerj.com/articles/1605/ Videoblocks https://www.videoblocks.com/video/bacteria-through-microscope/ Quartz http://qz.com/607374/antiperspirants-and-deodorants-are-changing-your-bodys-microbes/ Getty Images http://www.gettyimages.com/license/53268668/ Getty Images http://www.gettyimages.com/license/75436598/ Flickr https://www.flickr.com/photos/memestate/2211410314/ Image via: Getty Images / Justin Sullivan http://www.gettyimages.com/license/52077325
Views: 1057 Newsy Science
Looking To The Ocean Floor For New Antibiotics - Newsy
 
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We asked oceanographer and drug discovery researcher William Fenical why the ocean may be the best chance for new lifesaving drugs. See more at http://www.newsy.com/ Follow Newsy: http://www.twitter.com/newsyvideos Sources: Videoblocks https://www.videoblocks.com/video/fast-moving-ocean-current/ Scripps Institution of Oceanography https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0GUYSdsrMy8 University of California, San Diego https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f6NJy_15S7U Getty Images http://www.gettyimages.com/license/76008490 Videoblocks https://www.videoblocks.com/video/hermit-crabs-on-ocean-floor/ Image via: Getty Images / Joe Raedle http://www.gettyimages.com/license/76008490
Views: 588 Newsy Science
The Science Behind Why Some Fruits Help Your Waistline - Newsy
 
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A new study looks at why eating certain fruits and vegetables may make it easier to get back on the scale. See more at http://www.newsy.com/ Follow Katie Link: http://www.twitter.com/katie_link Sources: Flickr https://www.flickr.com/photos/alancleaver/4222532649/in/photolist-7r8zR4-7yoDnQ-2EAG9-4qH8LL-eDXeSW-oYKRgz-eDX8W1-eDR7Lk-AUJD2v-6PsYN4-iEEhqG-dVamH1-6Riapx-7wujCT-7NXyXm-7TBNNF-4H79q5-7nT7V1-9Wvryb-8gsuZ3-7gpiCW-7r8A2B-8tGpkT-7XbBhT-pZufvo-igKQbv-7TLwD8-5sMeaQ-7wuoyp-9quZrm-7NTynV-ove6se-8So1zf-2LJ54Z-a1e8YK-dYX3th-gLfVj6-67XVps-33JsqT-voM6wT-8WCVfY-9Bv2pX-xjRj7-8FbpzS-9BxWpw-g3BwA-ujSAKy-vgmYvf-ujSFk5-5dGW5x Videoblocks https://www.videoblocks.com/video/Pretty-girl-with-basket-buying-red-tomato-on-the-street-market-5vYCcTW/ The BMJ http://www.bmj.com/company/ Videoblocks https://www.videoblocks.com/video/closeup-of-assorted-fruit-rotating-on-white-background/ Getty Images http://www.gettyimages.com/license/487601713 Getty Images http://www.gettyimages.com/license/1328329 Women's Health http://www.womenshealthmag.com/food/sip-up-slim-down-the-right-way-to-drink-green-tea-for-weight-loss Videoblocks https://www.videoblocks.com/video/Female-hands-with-knife-chopping-yellow-paprika-WwLWjZ6/ Videoblocks https://www.videoblocks.com/video/NYC-People-Walk-Wall-Street-XeRhnKS/ Flickr https://www.flickr.com/photos/slushpup/2267015536/in/photolist-4sk3JL-7rtgnB-4HxDnU-ivrTj-4CRREz-8vvfrV-cC3KBo-5Ro6Q7-9eLBB2-2EtAcn-87N5Ri-dqVn8U-e3u3pn-aR1C4D-5FyNRD-5LAGKx-6LTuCD-eLjBR5-dS4eB8-eD32-87oVZG-dqRFna-dqSaL9-dqRPz6-dqRUMy-dqRXme-dqRJrV-dqRHft-dqRKBL-dqRQdJ-dqRGc1-dqRw3f-dqRySt-dqWnQg-dqWghM-dqUw2T-dMdML6-dqU13s-dqTt37-dqVJcr-dqSpyL-dqVa31-dqVD9Q-dqVzUd-dqTX1y-dqSoyB-dqWfey-dqU9EY-dqTAr1-dqWv2W Image via: Getty Images / Andrew Wong http://www.gettyimages.com/license/73129226
Views: 1163 Newsy Science
Why Are There So Few New Antibiotics? - Newsy
 
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More and more bacteria are becoming drug resistant, but few new antibiotics are being developed. What can be done to encourage new research? See more at http://www.newsy.com/ Follow Christian Bryant: http://www.twitter.com/bryantcp Sources: Internet Archive https://archive.org/details/HospitalSepsis Scripps Institution of Oceanography https://scripps.ucsd.edu/profiles/wfenical Videoblocks https://www.videoblocks.com/video/bright-blue-pacific-ocean-/ National Institutes of Health https://images.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=3265 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RpKZvnJwicA World Health Organization https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DijWErm_wwU Videoblocks https://www.videoblocks.com/video/Hand-holding-white-pills-thend-dropping-them---extreme-close-up-6-OGX0J/ Videoblocks https://www.videoblocks.com/video/Man-pouring-pills-into-hand-vANp0OF/ National Institutes of Health https://images.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=3302 GlaxoSmithKline https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zk0_s-RfY7E National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases https://www.flickr.com/photos/niaid/7739552618/ National Institutes of Health https://images.nigms.nih.gov/index.cfm?event=viewDetail&imageID=3254 U.S. Department of Agriculture https://www.flickr.com/photos/nrcs_south_dakota/7166253549/ Flickr https://www.flickr.com/photos/53421063@N02/21976568703/ Videoblocks https://www.videoblocks.com/video/capitol-reef-sky-time-lapse/ Videoblocks https://www.videoblocks.com/video/scientist-uses-equipment-in-laboratory/ Videoblocks https://www.videoblocks.com/video/chemical-laboratory-with-technician-in-india/ C-SPAN http://www.c-span.org/video/?325063-2/president-obama-remarks-antibioticresistant-bacteria Wikimedia Commons https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Antibiotic_resistant_bacteria.jpg Al Jazeera https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0ajM9SYDrJo Vice https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wLrGS4zKYpg Videoblocks https://www.videoblocks.com/video/rocks-and-animals-on-ocean-floor/ Videoblocks https://www.videoblocks.com/video/ocean-waves/ Image via: Newsy / Andrew Lawler
Views: 1241 Newsy Science
Mars Was Nicer When It Rained Asteroids - Newsy
 
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Transcript: Mars was nicer back when giant rocks were slamming into it on a regular basis. Ancient asteroid and comet impacts once gave the planet a more habitable environment, according to a new study from University of Colorado. Computer models show impacts could have produced enough heat and raised the atmospheric pressure enough to jump-start Mars' water cycle — and where there's heat and water, there are sometimes microbes. This study isn't suggesting there are microbes on Mars; it's just pointing out life would have been more easily supported. These impacts took place almost 4 billion years ago, back when there was a lot more junk flying around the inner solar system. Both Mars and Earth took a lot of hits from big space-rocks. But the computer models show in Mars' case, the heat from the impacts only lasted a few million years. Without oceans or a thick atmosphere like Earth's, the red planet literally ran out of steam. But Elon Musk's ominous-sounding plan to terraform Mars makes more sense now. Elon Musk: "There's the fast way, and the slow way." Stephen Colbert: "OK, give me the fast way." Musk: "The fast way is drop thermonuclear weapons over the poles." Colbert: "You're a supervillain." The bombs could melt frozen greenhouse gases and give Mars a thicker atmosphere, which means more heat and a better chance at eventually supporting life. NASA's not too keen on thermonuclear intervention, though. But it could be more interested in investigating hits from old comets. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory is scheduled to meet with the University of Colorado researchers to discuss potential landing sites and science tasks for the Mars 2020 research rover. Sources: NASA http://mars.nasa.gov/multimedia/images/?ImageID=6453 NASA https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Oq8lEKAY_fI Earth and Planetary Science Letters http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0012821X16300528 EurekAlert! http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2016-04/uoca-csa040416.php NASA https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0_iz5Nt0Qc8 NASA https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dNakyt-D47U NASA http://sservi.nasa.gov/articles/nlsi-scientists-find-history-of-asteroid-impacts-in-earth-rocks/ The Late Show with Stephen Colbert https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gV6hP9wpMW8 Los Angeles Times http://www.latimes.com/business/la-fi-elon-musk-mars-20150910-htmlstory.html NASA http://www.nasa.gov/feature/goddard/real-martians-how-to-protect-astronauts-from-space-radiation-on-mars NASA http://www.nasa.gov/press/2014/july/nasa-announces-mars-2020-rover-payload-to-explore-the-red-planet-as-never-before ------------------------------------- Newsy is your source for concise, unbiased video news and analysis covering the top stories from around the world. With persistent curiosity and no agenda, we strive to fuel meaningful conversations by highlighting multiple sides of every story. Newsy delivers the news and perspective you need without the hype and bias common to many news sources. See more at http://www.newsy.com/ Like Newsy on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/newsyvideos/
Views: 8727 Newsy Science
Insulin Is Getting Really Expensive - Newsy
 
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A new study suggests we need to rethink diabetes treatment because of the rising cost of insulin. The increasing costs have been noted in recent years, with some blaming a lack of "healthy" competition. "The interesting thing about the insulin market is there's really only three companies in the insulin market. So it's a very small number of companies. There's no generics, and the prices just seem to go up for these drugs in tandem," a Bloomberg reporter said. The study, published in JAMA, looked at insulin prices from 2002 to 2013. Since 2002, the cost of insulin increased by almost 200 percent — an increase made even more significant by findings that showed the amount of insulin being used per patient also increased. Medical Xpress suggests the increase in doses could be due to increases in obesity in that time period, and new national recommendations stressing lower sugar intake. Researchers predicted "the mean price of insulin is unlikely to decline as a result of generic competition because of the stringent regulations and substantial costs of bringing biosimilar insulins to market." This video includes images from Jill Brown / CC BY 2.0, Victor / CC BY 2.0 and Sprogz / CC BY 2.0 and clips from Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the American Diabetes Association. Sources: JAMA http://jama.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?articleid=2510902#ArticleInformation Flickr https://www.flickr.com/photos/jill_a_brown/2629206224/ dailyRx News Network, Inc. http://www.dailyrxnews.com/diabetes-patients-have-been-spending-increasingly-more-over-time-synthetic-insulins Bloomberg http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2015-05-06/diabetes-drugs-compete-with-prices-that-rise-in-lockstep Centers for Disease Control and Prevention https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wmOW091P2ew Flickr https://www.flickr.com/photos/v1ctor/7615946548/ Medical Xpress http://medicalxpress.com/news/2016-04-sugar-insulin-tripled-years.html Flickr https://www.flickr.com/photos/sprogz/5824606883/ American Diabetes Association https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D9Qa5J35ZPo ------------------------------------- Newsy is your source for concise, unbiased video news and analysis covering the top stories from around the world. With persistent curiosity and no agenda, we strive to fuel meaningful conversations by highlighting multiple sides of every story. Newsy delivers the news and perspective you need without the hype and bias common to many news sources. See more at http://www.newsy.com/ Like Newsy on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/newsyvideos/
Views: 1931 Newsy Science
Honeybee Head-Butts Say More Than We Thought - Newsy
 
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Transcript: Honeybees dance to guide their nestmates to food. This "waggle dance" conveys direction and distance to nectar — but sometimes it gets interrupted. If foraging bees encounter predators at a food source, they return to the nest and head-butt their dancing nestmates with a vibrated warning so fewer foragers will wander into the same trouble. Researchers have known about the behavior since 2006. But according to new research published in PLOS Biology, these vibrating warning signals vary in pitch, frequency and duration depending on the threat. The more dangerous a predator, the higher the pitch the warning signal is. And the closer the trouble is to the nest, the longer the vibration. Up until now, this kind of evolved threat awareness had only ever been observed in vertebrates. The researchers say, "This is the first demonstration of such sophisticated inhibitory signaling or alarm signaling in an insect." Sources: Nature http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v435/n7039/full/nature03526.html Georgia Tech https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bFDGPgXtK-U Getty Images http://www.gettyimages.com/license/85616053 Flickr https://www.flickr.com/photos/awajikiwi/15426393071/in/photolist-24RMFS-czoDK5-7eH6wP-pvbidk-hCAxnH-Ag4vb8-99VRyo-oQchTc-p7Gzuh-p7t3fi-p7s196-fVYwJM-agbvWe-66XjN-8ipLKx-or1FAL-i4mm8-epu5gD-fDsnuG-i4mma-pqVfrt-3HJXes-i4mm9 University of California, San Diego https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E0AbezQE5zk University of California, San Diego http://biology.ucsd.edu/news/article_021110.html YouTube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OEMg_F1yUJk PLOS Biology http://journals.plos.org/plosbiology/article?id=info:doi/10.1371/journal.pbio.1002423 National Parks Service https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WZS5ayKm8yI Getty Images http://www.gettyimages.com/license/81154434 EurekAlert! http://www.eurekalert.org/emb_releases/2016-03/uoc--bds032116.php ------------------------------------- Newsy is your source for concise, unbiased video news and analysis covering the top stories from around the world. With persistent curiosity and no agenda, we strive to fuel meaningful conversations by highlighting multiple sides of every story. Newsy delivers the news and perspective you need without the hype and bias common to many news sources. See more at http://www.newsy.com/ Like Newsy on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/newsyvideos/
Views: 918 Newsy Science
Sick Kids Can Now See The World Without Leaving St. Jude Hospital - Newsy
 
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Transcript: St. Jude Children's Research Hospital and Expedia have teamed up in a seriously cool way to help sick children. The "St. Jude Dream Adventures" campaign, the 360-degree virtual experience room at the Memphis, Tennessee, location lets children too sick to leave the hospital experience what it's like to travel the world. Here's how it works: An Expedia employee will travel to the child's dream location, which can be anywhere from an underwater tour to watching wild horses in Argentina. Once there, children will have the experience in real-time with the employee, which gives kids the opportunity to ask questions and learn from tour guides. Take Hannah, for example. She has since passed away, but was able to see something she never thought she would because of her illness. The project is the brainchild of the 180LA creative agency. And while this initial exhibition only featured four children, the agency says it's talking with the hospital about making it a permanent installation. And the agency, hospital and Expedia have teamed up before. A few years ago, the trio released an ad where Santa flew coach around the world so he could donate his Expedia+ points to the hospital. Sorry about not warning you to grab some tissues before checking out this story. Sources: Expedia https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2wQQh5tbSPw&list=PLdgCSoJzrmKHooMkCbpL00HE0EB-OPCP_&index=1 Ad Age http://adage.com/article/behind-the-work/expedia-takes-sick-children-thrilling-real-time-adventures-leaving-hospital/303218/ Expedia https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Dcmo__7mthw&list=PLdgCSoJzrmKHooMkCbpL00HE0EB-OPCP_&index=6 Expedia https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fOLXpD7p3As&index=7&list=PLdgCSoJzrmKHooMkCbpL00HE0EB-OPCP_ Expedia https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SM1amjURBZ8&index=4&list=PLdgCSoJzrmKHooMkCbpL00HE0EB-OPCP_ ------------------------------------- Newsy is your source for concise, unbiased video news and analysis covering the top stories from around the world. With persistent curiosity and no agenda, we strive to fuel meaningful conversations by highlighting multiple sides of every story. Newsy delivers the news and perspective you need without the hype and bias common to many news sources. See more at http://www.newsy.com/ Like Newsy on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/newsyvideos/
Views: 1605 Newsy Science
Sugary Drinks Might Hurt Our Brains As Much As Stress Or Abuse - Newsy
 
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Australian researchers found that stress and sugar consumption had similar effects on rats' brains, suggesting the same could be true for humans. So, we know that when we consume a sugary drink, like a soda, it activates the reward area in our brains — which can be satisfying. But according to Australian researchers, sugary drinks might also assault the brain and could be as harmful as stress or abuse. Researchers from the University of New South Wales Australia made these findings while studying rats. Some rats were exposed to adverse conditions after birth, causing stress, while others were given a sugary solution to drink. The researchers found that rats put under stress without the sugar intake and the stress-free rats who consumed sugar had similar changes in the hippocampus — the memory center of the brain. These aren't definitive findings on how sugary drinks can harm the human brain, but the researchers said, "The changes in the brain induced by sugar are of great concern given the high consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages, with particularly high consumption in children." To that point, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports American teens and young adults consume the most sugary drinks of any age group. The Australian researchers say the findings suggest more work is needed on the long-term effects of sugary drink consumption in humans. This video includes clips from University of New South Wales Australia and images from Getty Images. See more at http://www.newsy.com/ Follow Christian Bryant: http://www.twitter.com/BryantCP Sources: Videoblocks https://www.videoblocks.com/video/slow-motion-orange-soda-glass-pour/ Getty Images http://www.gettyimages.com/license/109912549 Getty Images http://www.gettyimages.com/license/53323638 University of New South Wales Australia http://newsroom.unsw.edu.au/news/health/sugar-may-be-damaging-brain-extreme-stress-or-abuse Getty Images http://www.gettyimages.com/license/79809871 Getty Images http://www.gettyimages.com/license/79809859 Getty Images http://www.gettyimages.com/license/151960676 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/databriefs/db71.htm Videoblocks https://www.videoblocks.com/video/Students-Walking-Into-School-3ErlwKZ/ Videoblocks https://www.videoblocks.com/video/slow-motion-beer-can-snapping-open/ Image via: Getty Images / Mario Tama http://www.gettyimages.com/license/151960676
Views: 633 Newsy Science