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About Melanoma Cancer Drug Keytruda ( Pembrolizumab )
 
02:38
Keytruda ( pembrolizumab ) is a new cancer drug to treat advanced melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer. An anti-body drug, administered intravenously, it uses the patient's immune system to attack cancer cells. Melanoma currently accounts for nearly 5% of all new cancers in the United States.This drug was developed by Merck.to help treat advanced melanoma that has spread or cannot be surgically removed.
Просмотров: 11554 CancerIS
How Does Targeted Cancer Therapy Work?
 
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Oncologist Stephen Lemon MD describes targeted therapy for cancer treatment and how it compares to standard chemotherapy. Visit http://www.canceris.net/targeted-cancer-therapy-work/ to learn more about his discussion on targeted therapy. Transcript of Dr. Stephen Lemon talk on targeted cancer therapy: "Targeted cancer therapy is a new and very promising approach to the treatment of cancer. It is designing new treatments, new drugs, that specifically target the cancer cell, so they avoid regular cells and go directly to the cancer cell and the cause that cancer cell to die. It includes drugs such as Herceptin, Avastin, and Erbitux. These can be given by themselves, or in combination with regular chemotherapy. He said that this drug would go direct to the cancer in the colon, and I said, “well, does it have a GPS or something to know where to go or something, it mustn't dilly-dally!” He explained it as a smart bomb, which was a great way of explaining it, he said it's gonna go in there and it's gonna kill every HER2/neu positive protein that you've got. The Avastin's looking for those cells that hide, you know, they're lurking there, that's what the Avastin does, it's a follow-up. It's a clean-up, so to speak. Targeted therapies are specific to individual cancers, so different targeted therapies are used in different cancer treatments. Dr. Lemon put me on Herceptin because it's a blocker, it'll keep the kind of cancer that I had from coming back is the way it was explained to me. So I would come in once a week for exactly a year and get the injections. It didn't really phase me at all. Common side effects in regular chemotherapy, such as hair loss, nausea, vomiting, are the result of cancer treatment going to normal cells, such as hair follicles and cells of the intestinal tract. But targeted therapy, because it zeroes in on specific cancer cells, avoids those side effects, so someone does not lose their hair or have a lot of nausea or vomiting. Well, I don't know what drugs he had me on, but he had me on it in June, and that was my lowest ebb, was in June. I just wasn't doing well, I had diarrhea, that was the worst thing to have to handle because I was getting to the point where I was almost housebound. So he switched me over to Erbitux, and that has been just night and day. The diarrhea has stopped, but a side effect was breaking out of the face, and I said well that I could handle, with a little liquid makeup I'm fine. But to be able to go and shop and not have my other problem, it's a relief. Now sometimes when the targeted therapy is combined with traditional chemotherapy, a patient will still have those side effects. From the Herceptin itself I didn't have any side effects. I did lose my hair, it wasn't from the Herceptin, it was from the chemo drugs, my chemo cocktail I call it. Evidently this drug is working, I'm feeling much better, I'm feeling better than I've felt in a year. If you're not going through treatment you have no reason to know what HER2/neu positive is, and what Herceptin is, and how new and amazing Herceptin is, you just have no idea."
Просмотров: 11960 CancerIS
New Targeted Therapy Lung Cancer Drug Gilotrif ( Afatinib )
 
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Gilotrif (Afatinib) is a new FDA approved cancer treatment for non-small cell lung cancer. Gilotrif targets advanced lung cancer, such as metastatic non-small cell lung cancer that is EGFR positive. Taken as a pill, this new targeted therapy treats people with cancers that have a genetic mutation in a gene called epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Stephen Lemon MD, MPH medical oncologist discusses this promising new cancer drug. CancerIS produced this video to help provide useful cancer information to cancer patients. CancerIS.net is an online resource to find and share information about cancer. Visit http://www.CancerIS.net to learn more. With 1.6 million new cancer cases every year, lung cancer is the biggest cancer killer in the world. Lung cancer is not a single disease, as research shows there are various types, with some requiring specific treatments. One variation of lung cancer can be defined by the mutations in EGFR, which is a protein found on the surface of some cells to which epidermal growth factor binds, causing the cells to divide. It is found at abnormally high levels on the surface of many types of cancer cells, which continue to grow and divide. In the United Sates, about 15% of patients with non-small cell lung cancer have mutations to the EGFR.
Просмотров: 4008 CancerIS
About Her2 Positive Breast Cancer Drug Perjeta ( Pertuzumab )
 
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Perjeta (pertuzumab) is a breast cancer drug showing promise extending the lives of people with an aggressive type of breast cancer referred to as HER2-positive breast cancer. Visit http://www.canceris.net/perjeta-her2-positive-breast-cancer-treatment/to learn more about this promising new cancer treatment. Given intravenously, as part of a combination with cancer drugs Herceptin and Taxotere, the drug may be used in the neoadjuvant treatment, where chemotherapy is given to the patient before surgery, as well as during the initial treatment of metastatic cancer, where the cancer has spread beyond the breast to other areas.
Просмотров: 2765 CancerIS
how does cancer drug keytruda work?
 
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Learn mote about this cancer treatment
Просмотров: 4127 CancerIS
Stage 2 Breast Cancer Patient Adell Duncan
 
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Going through stage 2 breast cancer treatment, Adell overcame a lumpectomy, a mastectomy and chemotherapy treatment, Visit http://oacancer.com/oncology-associates-patient-stories/ for more stories of cancer patients and survivors.
Просмотров: 1720 CancerIS
How Xgeva (Denosumab) Treats Bone Metastases
 
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Xgeva is an FDA approved targeted therapy used to prevent bone fractures and reduce bone pain for certain types of cancers with bone metastases, such as metastatic breast cancer. In this video, oncologist Dr. Stephen Lemon explains how Xgeva works and what types of side effects it can cause.
Просмотров: 1965 CancerIS
What is Small Cell Lung Cancer?
 
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About 12 out of every 100 lung cancers diagnosed are small cell lung cancer. So what is it? Oncologist Stephen Lemon discusses this cancer, the symptoms and the treatment for it. Visit http://www.lemonmd.com/lemonmd-in-action/lectures/ to see other cancer lectures. Dr. Stephen Lemon is a board certified oncologist, cancer lecturer and writer, who produces cancer information videos as well as cancer education projects like http://CancerIS.net. LemonMD was founded to provide year-round information on cancer related topics, new treatments, research and drugs, as well as on subjects devoted to existing cancer patients and cancer survivors.
Просмотров: 2727 CancerIS
Prostate Cancer Treatment Xofigo Offers Hope
 
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Dr. Stephen Lemon talks about the cancer drug Xofigo ( radium-223 dichloride ) for the treatment of patients with late stage prostate cancer that has spread to the bones but not to other organs, such as the lung, liver or brain, and where patients have already received treatment to lower testosterone. As testosterone may cause prostate cancer to grow, the goal of some surgery and drug treatments is to lower the level of this male hormone in the body. When the cancer spreads or comes back after such treatment, it is sometimes referred to as castration resistant. Xofigo is being studied for the treatment of bone metastasis in other cancers as well. Xofigo is marketed by Bayer Pharmaceuticals.
Просмотров: 2217 CancerIS
Surviving Pancreatic Cancer Against All Odds
 
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Diagnosed with stage four pancreatic cancer, Bob wasn't given good odds to survive. In fact, one physician told him that his cancer would kill him. Now cancer free, Bob shares his remarkable story. Visit http://www.canceris.net/portfolio-item/surviving-pancreatic-cancer-odds/ to learn more about Bob's journey with cancer. ** About CancerIS ** CancerIS a place to find and share cancer information, tips and stories. Visit http://www.canceris.net to learn more. ** Transcription from Bob's story as a stage 4 pancreatic cancer survivor. "A year ago, in June, I was diagnosed with cancer. I was having some back pains in my lower kidney area, and I'd gone in to see a doctor, my family physician, and she reccommended a CAT scan. There was a large tumor on my pancreas that had grown to cover the blood vessel between the pancreas and the kidney, and it was quite serious. It was stage four, which is a very advanced stage of pancreatic cancer. Unfortunately, with pancreatic cancer, by the time you find it, it normally is stage four. One of the doctors had come in and told me that it was serious and that I would die from this cancer. My wife and I were very emotional about this, we'd lost our son a couple of years before this, our only child was killed in a motorcycle accident and he was killed a week before his wedding. So with this happening, it really hit us hard. I was especially concerned about Barb, my wife, who I've known since fifth grade-- we grew up together, went to school together, and everything-- I just couldn't imagine what effect this would have on her, losing both of us. I relied a lot on friends. Our faith kept us going and out friends kept us busy. I tried to be as active as I could. I do photography on the side for a local museum and I kept active doing as much as I could, but when things got to the point where I was taking radiation I really wasn't feeling good. I took about a six month leave of absence because I couldn't do that. I pushed myself, we'd go on hikes, went on vacation, did some long bike rides and hiking and that type of thing. The key is keep your mind busy. You can't dwell on the bad part, you've got to look for the bright light at the end of the tunnel so to speak. After doing the radiation and chemotherapy together we did another CAT scan, and Doctor Lemon and Doctor Deitrich looked at it, and they felt that the tumor had shrunken enough, that it had come off the artery to the kidney, that they could go in and do surgery. So, on the first of July, I went into Methodist Hospital and Doctor Deitrich performed a whipple procedure on me. He removed the entire tumor and part of the pancreas. They felt that they had gotten all the cancer out of my body, out of my system, the tumor and everything. There were no infections in my lymph nodes or anything, so that was extremely good news. Subsequently they did another CAT scan, three months later, and they say there's no sign of any tumor, there's no sign of cancer in my blood, all my cancer levels are way below normal. Now I'm getting stronger all the time. I'm back down at the museum doing photography again, and things are looking good. Someone telling you that you have cancer is the scariest thing in the world, but it does not have to be. You can get through this. It can be a positive life journey. And there is light at the end of the tunnel."
Просмотров: 157 CancerIS
Google Glass Tour of ASCO Exhibit Hall (American Society of Clinical Oncologty)
 
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Using Google Glass, medical oncologist Dr. Stephen Lemon of CancerIS recently toured the American Society of Clinical Oncology ( ASCO ) conference exhibit hall.For more videos, information and photos visit http://www.canceris.net/channels/live-event-asco-2014/ About CancerIS: CancerIS.net offers an online resource for anyone touched by cancer to find and share any information regarding cancer, such as new treatments and drugs, informative videos, personal stories, medical talks or lectures and much more. Please connect with the CancerIS community at http://www.canceris.net
Просмотров: 247 CancerIS
My Journey with Stage4 Colon Cancer
 
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Going through stage 4 colon cancer as a young mother has been a challenge for Keisha Holloway. But it\'s a challenge that Keisha takes on every day with a fighter\'s determination. In this video, Keisha shares her journey through cancer; a journey that she says has helped her become a stronger, more compassionate person.
Просмотров: 253 CancerIS
Lynparza Advanced Ovarian Cancer Treatment
 
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What are the benefits and side effects of Lynparza? This video talks about how this new cancer drug works as well as discusses what types of side effects may occur from the treatment.
Просмотров: 177 CancerIS
Cancer Affects Everyone
 
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Cancer touches many of us. But our experiences with it are often unique. Here are some words used by people to describe their personal journey through cancer.. Visit http://www.canceris.net to learn more about the CancerIS community. In the words of cancer survivors, patients and caregivers, this is how they define cancer: Cancer is a scary word. A wake-up call. A game changer. Cancer is a storm. Cancer's a Sh**ty disease. A mountain worth climbing. A big challenge. It's both a curse and a blessing. Cancer is beatable. Treatable. Cancer is a new way of life. It's an experience of a lifetime. A blessing to me because once you get through it, you can help others get through it. It's a new beginning. Cancer is not the end. Cancer affects everyone. Share your cancer story at CancerIS.net
Просмотров: 543 CancerIS
What Does Cancer Mean to You? - CancerIS Community
 
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Devastating. Life changing. Love. What is cancer to you? Various cancer survivors, patients and caregivers define what cancer means to them. Find and share cancer information and stories at CancerIS.net - http://www.canceris.net.
Просмотров: 223 CancerIS
Mike Ness and Mike McCready
 
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Mike Ness and Mike McCready MusiCares concert for recovery 2018
Просмотров: 198 CancerIS
Cancer Survivors Day Omaha 2013
 
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Oncologist Stephen Lemon MD from Oncology Associates and Serese Cole from WOWT 6 News celebrate life at the annual Cancer Survivors Day in Omaha. Visit http://www.canceris.net to learn more about the CancerIS Community.
Просмотров: 187 CancerIS
Coping with Hair loss
 
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Cancer survivors and patients share their experiences and tips of dealing with hair loss during their chemotherspy treatments.
Просмотров: 36 CancerIS
Caspar Babypants - Here Comes the Sun
 
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Visit Caspar's Website https://www.babypantsmusic.com/ Visit Caspar's Youtube Channel https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCucDn84WRkjXLOlAI_GxplQ
Просмотров: 44 CancerIS
TDM-1 Breast Cancer Drug
 
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Kadcyla (TDM-1) is a recently approved breast cancer drug. This video explains how the treatment works.
Просмотров: 91 CancerIS
ALS #icebucketchallenge Stephen Lemon MD
 
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Dr. Stephen Lemon accepts the #icebucketchallenge and avoids asystole for a good cause ALS awareness and support. Learn more about the ALS at http://www.alsa.org/about-als/what-is-als.html Dr. Stephen Lemon is a board certified oncologist, cancer lecturer and writer, who produces cancer information videos and cancer education websites. Visit http://www.lemonmd.com/about-dr-stephen-lemon/ to learn more about Dr. Lemon.
Просмотров: 78 CancerIS
Mastectomy vs Lumpectomy
 
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For breast cancer patients deciding between the surgery options of a mastectomy or a lumpectomy can be a difficult decision. In this video, oncologist Stephen Lemon talks about the two surgery options.
Просмотров: 47 CancerIS
Nancy Wilson and Mike McCready
 
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Nancy Wilson and Mike McCready perform Even It Up at MusiCares concert for recovery
Просмотров: 32 CancerIS
ASCO Event Opening with Dr. Clifford Hudis ( American Society of Clinical Oncology )
 
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ASCO President Dr. Clifford Hudis presents his lecture "Science and Society: Fifty Years Later" This is the first 5 min of his presentation. Using Google Glass, Dr. Stephen Lemon of CancerIS filmed at this event. For more information from the conference visit http://www.canceris.net/channels/live-event-asco-2014/ About CancerIS: CancerIS.net offers an online resource for anyone touched by cancer to find and share any information regarding cancer, such as new treatments and drugs, informative videos, personal stories, medical talks or lectures and much more. Please connect with the CancerIS community at http://www.canceris.net
Просмотров: 413 CancerIS
Welcome to CancerIS a Cancer Information Resource
 
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Medical oncologist Stephen Lemon MD introduces CancerIS an online resource to find and share cancer information. Visit http://www.CancerIS.net to learn more. CancerIS an online community for anyone who has been touched by cancer. Patients. Survivors. Caregivers. Health providers. Loved ones and friends. it's a place to easily find and share any information regarding cancer, such as personal stories, cancer research, inspirational talks, new cancer drugs or treatments and much more. Share your story or information, or listen to what others have to say at http://www.CancerIS.net.
Просмотров: 282 CancerIS
Men Get Breast Cancer Too - CancerIS Medical Minute
 
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Men can be diagnosed with male breast cancer. While the chances for men are much lower compared to women, men need to be aware of male breast cancer and its symptoms. Breast cancer survivor Rick Gough talks about the symptoms and his treatment. Visit http://www.canceris.net/portfolio-item/breast-cancer-can-affect-males/ to learn more about male breast cancer. Male Breast Cancer Survivor Rick Gough - CancerIS Medical Minute I was showering and I noticed that my left nipple was inverted and I hadn't noticed that before. There was no pain with it, no lumps. I couldn't feel anything associated with it other than it was inverted. One month later By mid-March I'd had an experience with it. There was some drainage that was like a lymph-y type drainage that would come out and would crust around the edge of the nipple. I'd get in the shower and it would wash right off. There was no pain or discomfort with it. One week later And then I noticed about a week after that, around the areola part there was a spot like somebody was taking a sewing needle with the eye end on the inside pushing trying to get out. And so I could feel this and it was real hard pushing when I touched it. No pain again, but tactually it was very strange. The diagnosis And I just happened to have had my dermatological annual check scheduled in mid-March. And so I went to that and the doctor says, how has everything been for the last year. Any changes? And I said yea, this. So he took a look at it and said we're going to do a biopsy of that and see what it is. I'm anticipating it will be skin cancer or something of that nature. When it came back two days later he says good news, bad news. The good news is it's not skin cancer, the bad news is it's invasive ductal carcinoma. Surgery It was the 11th of April he did the surgery and he did a sentinel node biopsy as he did the surgery, found the lymph nodes were involved. And so they did a full mastectomy and they took all the lymph nodes back up under the arm. I needed to do a six session dose of chemotherapy. The first day of chemo It was kind of interesting. The first day in I was scared, anxious about it. Probably didn't sleep well the night before because I didn't know what to expect in the way of side effects. But the office, the staff, was just absolutely great in terms of reassuring me that what you're about to take, we have other medicines so that if you have any bad side effects we can probably totally offset those, if not completely. And they were right, they were able to do that. Chemotherapy side effects I was tired but I was still able to eat and taste food. Then after about the third day food didn't have any taste anymore. As I described to my wife, this is either dirt or sand but I can't tell what it is. That didn't do a lot for our relationship on her cooking because she's always been a marvelous cook. Radiation Radiation was another experience after Dr. Lemon finished with the chemo I started radiation. And we did that for 36 treatments and it was every day, 5 days a week. Radiation side effects It was not a bad experience. I mean yea, I got some skin changes and those kind of things during the radiation, but there's a lot of ointments and creams and things that you can use on your skin which helps minimize the impact of that. Advice from experience You need to check yourself. Check your breasts, check your testicles. Make sure there's nothing strange going on, lumps or bumps or whatever. In the case of a nipple, if it's inverted have somebody check it pretty quickly. Maybe it's nothing but that's one of the common signs of breast cancer is an inversion of the nipple. Don't ignore it just because you're a man. And there's nothing that's going to happen to you that is so terrifying you can't get through it. You'll get through it and it will probably end up being easier than you think it will. If you've got a problem – if you have cancer – you have to get it taken care of, because sooner is better than later. If you think you've got a problem and you ignore it, it's not going to go away. It's only going to get worse. And your odds rapidly diminish if you don't address it quickly. You just want to get it early. Visit CancerIS to find and share cancer information - http://www.canceris.net
Просмотров: 1767 CancerIS
Why I Chose Genetic Testing for Cancer
 
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Steph Shephard, a breast cancer survivor, explains her reasons for genetic testing, or cancer risk assessment, for cancer. A young mother, Steph wanted to verify that her family did not have a higher than normal risk for cancer. She also was able to determine whether she might be at risk for a second type of cancer. Watch and share more videos on cancer topis at http://www.canceris.net Stephanie's Transcript: It was important to me because if it was genetic then everybody in my family would obviously have a higher chance of getting it, but my son would also have a higher chance of getting some type of cancer too, and I would have a higher chance of it coming back in another area in my body, which I'm sure I do now but that made it even higher. So it was very important to me just so that the other people in my family could kind of be at ease with it. So once it came back that it was negative they could be like, ok, we're not at that high a risk to get it. That was more important to me than myself, than worrying about it coming back in me. The genetics counselor called me and I actually just talked to her over the phone about it, but I think if it would have come back positive that I would have actually went in and sat down and talked with her about it. She just called me over the phone and said this came back negative, that it's not genetic, and these are your percentages of getting it, the same as everybody else now. And so everyone in your family is at as much risk as everyone else that doesn't have it.
Просмотров: 48 CancerIS
Ibrance a New Breast Cancer Drug
 
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Learn more about the promising new breast cancer treatment Ibrance. In this video, oncologist Dr. Stephen Lemon talks about how this new cancer drug works for advanced breast cancer, who the treatment benefits and what types of side effects patients may experience.
Просмотров: 38 CancerIS
Living with Metastatic Breast Cancer and Thriving
 
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Diagnosed with stage4 #metastaticbreastcancer DeDra Robb brings a \'just do it\' attitude to her daily life, as she leads a full life going through her #cancer treatmenr.
Просмотров: 25 CancerIS
Real Men Get Breast Cancer - A Survivor Story
 
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Diagnosed with male breast cancer, Rick talks about his journey with a disease he never thought he could get. Going through his treatment, which included a mastectomy, radiation therapy and chemotherapy, Rick learned more about the disease than he ever wanted to. Visit http://www.canceris.net/male-breast-cancer-diagnosis/ to learn more about going through breast cancer as a male. Here's Rick's breast cancer transcript: "For me, as strange as this might sound, I think cancer is love. It was helpful for my wife and I, in terms of understanding the frailty of life. I think the whole process is tougher on the family than it is on the patient, as far as I'm concerned, at least in my experience. I've got medications and things I can take to help me get through it, I don't have anything for my wife or my family. They're all going through the emotional rollercoaster, I'm just in the process of doing some work. My son, just before we started the chemo, he shaved my head for me so that when the grandkids all come in this is done, as opposed to them seeing it come out in lumps and whatever. I think it was probably a little hard for him to do that, but at the same time I think it was okay for him to do that because he was in control of doing it then instead of something else happening. We had a friend who had breast cancer, probably 14, 15, 16 years ago I guess. I called her, I probably hadn't seen her in three or four years, and I said “Sherry, what can I expect,” and she said, “well, what's you diagnosis?” So I told her, and she said “exactly what I had”. So she went through the whole process that I was about to go through and it gave me a lot of comfort. The Omaha Fashion, they have one of the first nights of the Fashion Walk, they dedicate it to the cancer survivors, and the cancer survivors are the models. I participated in that, and that was a really great experience. A lot of the medical people here in town that are involved in cancer treatments, both from radiation oncology as well as medical oncology like Dr. Lemon's office, they all go and they participate in the event in terms of buying tickets and supporting it. I also did a project with Project Pink'd here in Omaha, which is a local group, and what they do is they provide necessary items that a cancer patient might need, whether it's scarves or wigs, sometimes it's transportation to get back and forth to their chemo sessions or their doctor's. Not everybody has the ability to get there easily. So if they can provide those kinds of services to those folks that's what they do, and it's a really worthwhile project. We did a calendar, we were set aside as being kind of the surprise in the calendar, because they've done this for two or three years and it's always been women. Cancer is love by the way it brings people together. From the standpoint that I had the opportunity to meet all these people that I didn't know that seemed to care about me. Then there were fellow patients that I met that I felt the same way about, and you could tell from them they were all equally concerned about how I was doing as I was of them. So to me, as strange as it might seem, I would say love would be the word I would use to describe it."
Просмотров: 82 CancerIS
Biking to Support Colon Cancer Awareness - Rollin to Colon, NE
 
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Starting off at the Rollin' to Colon bike ride, Oncologist Stephen Lemon of Omaha uses Google Glass to give a bike cam perspective of the Rollin to Colon bike ride which promotes colon cancer awareness and education for colon screenings. Each year the Great Plains Colon Cancer Task Force organizes this bike ride which offers different bike routes from 53 miles to 8 miles. These routes convene in Colon, Nebraska.
Просмотров: 62 CancerIS
Melonie's Last Chemo Day
 
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A round of applause for Melonie Madsen who just completed her last chemo day for stage2 breast cancer. Congrats to you, Melonie. We wish you all the best!
Просмотров: 30 CancerIS
Faith is Tougher than Breast and Cervical Cancer | CancerIS
 
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Surviving both cervical cancer and breast cancer, Faith proves tougher than cancer. Faith talks about her cancer diagnosis surprised her, as well as about her decision not to go through chemotherapy and why she chose to have a bi-lateral mastectomy. Watch other stories or share your story at http://www.canceris.net Here's a transcript of Faith's journey with breast cancer: "It was on a Saturday morning. I got up and I got out of the shower, and I was putting my lotion on, I looked in the mirror. I had seen something, there was a spot on my nipple, and I looked and I thought, “what is that?” I looked down at it, it kind of looked like a little blister or something. I thought, huh? I tried to squeeze it-- don't squeeze it, that really is a tender spot, you don't want to squeeze down there. I looked and it had a black center, the center of it was black, and I thought, “I don't think this is a good thing”. So the next day I went to see the specialist, and they did a biopsy on my nipple, and he said “come back next week, we'll go over your results”. I had just bought a restaurant. I had a towing service, All American Towing, and I had just bought a restaurant, so I was busy trying to run two businesses. I told the doctor, “I really don't have time to come in for the results, can't you just call me and tell me over the phone?” And he was like nope, you have to come in. So I go in there and I'm looking, it's like, my waitress leaves at two o'clock, and it's almost 1:30, so hurry up, hurry up! And they said, “I'm sorry Faith, but it's cancer.” And I punched the doctor, I said, “it is not!” I said, “I just had a mammogram, it's not cancer”, and he said “yes it is,” and I said “no it's not!” He said “yes, it is,” and he handed me the paper, and said “here's the results of your biopsy, you have invasive ductal carcinoma.” I left there and I tried not to cry, because I always say I'm a tow truck driver and I'm strong! But I went out to my car and I started to cry, and I called my friend and told him it's cancer. I cried so hard I couldn't even drive, so I told him to come tow me home. And then my gynecologist called and said “you have cervical cancer too”. She said we need to do a hysterectomy as soon as possible. So six weeks after my double mastectomy I had a complete hyterectomy. The way I look at it, you just gotta be strong. You gotta get up and do what you can do, don't let it keep you down, you know. You gotta be tougher than the cancer. I've always been one to try and do everything on my own, without asking for help, but there comes a point when you need help. Pray to God, God gives you the strength to make it through, and thank God for family and friends. They're there for me." I've been cancer-free for two years. Cancer is tough, but I'm tougher!
Просмотров: 57 CancerIS
Video May 10, 10 17 40 PM
 
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Просмотров: 2 CancerIS
Northwest Hope & Healing Fashion Show 2018
 
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Northwest Hope & Healing Fashion 2018 Survivor Story
Просмотров: 8 CancerIS
Rollin Rollin filming
 
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Test test
Просмотров: 6 CancerIS
How Overlake ER Makes A Difference
 
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Against all odds, Overlake ER made a difference. #BandageBa
Просмотров: 6 CancerIS
Cancer Care with Dr. Budd
 
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Meet Dr. Buddharaju (Aka Dr. Budd) of Oncology Associates.
Просмотров: 3 CancerIS
Video May 10, 10 10 51 PM
 
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Просмотров: 3 CancerIS
Offut Air Force Base on the bike trail
 
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Offut Air Force Base on the bike trail
Просмотров: 1 CancerIS
Melonie's Last Chemo Day
 
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A round of applause for Melonie who completes her last chemo for stage2 breast cancer.
Просмотров: 24 CancerIS
James Kim Survivor
 
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Просмотров: 5 CancerIS
Relay for Life
 
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Relay for Life
Просмотров: 3 CancerIS
Ramesh Rengan, M D , Ph D
 
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John Richards of KEXP introduces Dr Ramesh Rengen.
Просмотров: 7 CancerIS
Sledding
 
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Fun on the hill
Просмотров: 1 CancerIS
Beach fun
 
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Beach fun
Просмотров: 24 CancerIS
Riding the Keystone trail
 
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Riding the Keystone trail
Просмотров: 6 CancerIS
Relay for Life
 
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Relay for Life
Просмотров: 4 CancerIS
Last Chemo Day for Kathy
 
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Kudos to Kathy McConnell who finished her last chemo today! Kathy wraps up 1 year of adjuvant Herceptin treatment for stage1 HER2-positive breast cancer. Looking good, Kathy!
Просмотров: 8 CancerIS
95 Years Young
 
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Bob Morley shows off his new Mustang. Bob is 95 years young and is currently receiving treatment for stage4 kidney cancer. Looking good, Bob!
Просмотров: 13 CancerIS